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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got a new used tank and need advice on how to disinfect it. It includes a hood with detachable leds, a heater, and the tank. I have ammonia that I bought at the dollar store to eventually do a fishless cycle.


Can I use this to disinfect my tank too, or should I use something else?

Thanks!


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This is how I disinfect my tanks and bowls.

For the tank and any submersible equipment use a bleach/water solution and let it sit about 10-15 mins. I usually use a couple splashes of bleach into the tank. Then rinse that out and use regular water with dechlorinator (read the label and use the amount for chloramine) and let it sit for another 10-15 mins.

I have not had to disinfect a hood or lights. I think if you carefully used a sponge or cloth and bleach/water solution it would work okay. Just make sure it's not plugged in and it is thoroughly dried after.
 

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I wipe it down with a bleach/water solution. Rinse. Let air dry. No need for dechlor. The bleach is gone in 24 hours.
 
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Bleach is good but vinegar is better if you want to remove calcium deposits.

Also, remember, glutaraldehyde is a disinfectant. Many of us have this product on hand. I buy it by the gallon rather than use Flourish Excel.

Mike
 

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Any of the following can be used, each for a different purpose, or with a different mode of action:

Vinegar, Coca Cola, lemon juice, citric acid, other acidic materials (some are very strong). Removes mineral build up, which is often calcium carbonate.

Bleach. Breaks apart organic matter such as the bio film formed by microorganisms. Kills many microorganisms, but not all.

Rubbing Alcohol. Kills many microorganisms, but does not get into the bio film. If you suspect the tank or equipment has been exposed to Mycobacterium (any of several species or strains), use the bleach first followed by rubbing alcohol.

Salt. I sprinkle it onto a wet cloth, and rub the tank while the grains are still intact. Abrassive, safe for glass, removes stuck-on algae. Mild disinfectant: Many fresh water organisms cannot tolerate salt.

Drying. After any of the above, or after a thorough washing, allowing the tank and all the equipment to thoroughly dry can also kill some organisms.

Other disinfectants: Read and follow label directions, especially about what to use to neutralize and remove it.

NEVER combine ANY forms of cleaners, disinfectants or other such materials. Always thoroughly rinse the tank and equipment between various treatments.

Time (such as when you are doing the fishless cycle): Many diseases and parasites cannot live without a host. During the 3 weeks or so that the fishless cycle lasts certain organisms will be dying.

Side note:
I have used that dollar tree ammonia. It is very diluted. Add some, test... add some more... test... Make sure you give it some time to circulate. I ended up using the whole bottle to cycle a 20 gallon tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks! It's a 20 gallon tank. Since I bought it used I don't know what it's been exposed to. I've dealt with a swim bladder issue, ich and fin rot with my petstore Betta before he finally stabilized. I want to rule out any tank issues before I put any new fish in. My plan is to make a 3D background so that'll take me a while and the tank will need to be drained and refilled several times before the ph levels out after putting the background in. So I think I'm going to go with bleach and time to ensure that its safe.


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