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Hello everyone,

I was wondering if i can hook up the outlet hose from my CO2 tank directly into my powerhead. Will that work in leiu of a diffuser or reactor?
 

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Works great for me. I have an AC20 powerhead in my 29g with the CO2 line hooked directly into it. Makes a nice mist, though it is the loudest thing in the tank. Still not loud enough to cause me problems but if you have a dead silent room you will hear it.
 

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Works great for me. I have an AC20 powerhead in my 29g with the CO2 line hooked directly into it. Makes a nice mist, though it is the loudest thing in the tank. Still not loud enough to cause me problems but if you have a dead silent room you will hear it.
That noise is the integrated bubble counter (bubbles hitting impeller). :icon_cool

I use a water pump/powerhead with the co2 line stuck into the intake vent via one of those plastic Lees elbows. It's at least as efficient as my inline reactor without restricting water flow from the canister filter. With the addition of the water pump, the water flow is of course, increased.

But, you don't want to diffuse this way if its in a bedroom because it is noisy. Fortunately, my tank is in the basement where the sleeper couch is only used occasionally.
 

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From my experience it uses up more CO2 than say using a Rex reactor, but the plants like this method of diffusion better. The fish will also thank you for not killing them. Misting from a powerhead causes less stress on the fish because not all the CO2 gets dissolved directly into the water.
 

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From my experience it uses up more CO2 than say using a Rex reactor, but the plants like this method of diffusion better. The fish will also thank you for not killing them. Misting from a powerhead causes less stress on the fish because not all the CO2 gets dissolved directly into the water.

When you say "more" co2, are you meaning several more bps? I have used 3 bps in a 46 gallon bowfront when using an external PVC reactor and when using the water pump. The water pump output is about 2 inches from the substrate. It sits in the left rear corner and aimed toward the front glass so it causes a current going in a counter clockwise direction toward the canister intake in the right rear corner. The canister output is mid way up in the left rear corner aimed at the front glass creating just enough turbulance at the surface to minimize surface scum.

The reason I went through this boring explanation is that there are numerous reasons on needing more co2 bps for a given co2 concentration. An example would be, you had minimal surface turbulence when using the reactor because of restricted flow. Then you added the powerhead creating more surface turbulence, causing more co2 loss.

Just seeing if there might be something I'm missing in my observations.
 

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ShrimpRetirement
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When you say "more" co2, are you meaning several more bps? I have used 3 bps in a 46 gallon bowfront when using an external PVC reactor and when using the water pump. The water pump output is about 2 inches from the substrate. It sits in the left rear corner and aimed toward the front glass so it causes a current going in a counter clockwise direction toward the canister intake in the right rear corner. The canister output is mid way up in the left rear corner aimed at the front glass creating just enough turbulance at the surface to minimize surface scum.

The reason I went through this boring explanation is that there are numerous reasons on needing more co2 bps for a given co2 concentration. An example would be, you had minimal surface turbulence when using the reactor because of restricted flow. Then you added the powerhead creating more surface turbulence, causing more co2 loss.

Just seeing if there might be something I'm missing in my observations.
This is "my" logic since I'm no expert, do take it with a grain of salt if you will. When "misting" from a powerhead you create a gazillion tiny bubbles that will adhere to the plant leaves, disperse at the water surface, and dissolve in the water. Note - not all the CO2 gas is 100% dissolved in the water with this method.

Now with an inline reactor, you'll get close to 100% CO2 dissolved in the water (relative to the size of your tank, reactor, and flowrate) right away. That's why with this method it requires less CO2 to get to 30ppm. It's an efficent way to diffuse CO2 into water but the plants prefer the CO2 bubbles on their leaves that you get right away from "misting", for easier absorption.
 
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