The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,934 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know how to kill plants. What I need to know is how YOU plant yours because the last time I planted stemmed plants I much have crushed the stems cause they rotted off just above the substrate.
Just got some trimmngs and they have no roots on some which will make it harder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
I have always taken 2-5 stems together and placed them in the sub, at least an inch deep and with some of the leaves under the sub.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
I remove the leaves for the portion of the stem I am planting. I use fine tweezers to drive the stems in the substrate with as much of the stem as possible shielded by the tweezers (tongs) I plant stems one at a time for broad leaf and multiple stems bunches for smaller leaf plants. Not all stems require the same treatment though. My blyxa didn't like being planted deep.
 

·
Pixel Prestidigitator
Joined
·
4,343 Posts
I take the stems in hand and drag a bit through the gravel until they're down. I back the stem with my index finger to prevent them from breaking. Works most of the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
I think it really depends on your substrate. You would definitely need forceps if you have banana fingers like me. If you are low on stems and you need to plant in a big area you can plant the one by one but if you have a lot of stems you can bunch them up and plant them. If you bunch them up, they usually float back up so even though its much easier to bunch them up, I recommend planting them one by one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
I alternate between using my finger to put the plant in (I have tiny hands compared to most) and planting tongs. It depends on what else is planted near and what tank it is. I try to not put my hands in the shrimp tanks very often but my bigger tanks it can't be helped so rarely use tongs in those. Less likely to use my fingers in the dirt tanks because the slimey wet dirt feels nasty on my finger and can be messy.

I clean the bottom portion of the stem of leaves, so the leaves don't rot under the substrate after I plant then then try to carefully plant without bruising or breaking the stem. If I feel it break while I'm planting it, I'll cut that part off and then remove more leaves and try to be more careful the next go round. I also plant most all things individually because my fish will uproot things I plant in bunches. Actually my cories torment my by uprooting newly planted plants the first few days, after they decide they aren't new and interesting any longer they stay planted.
 

·
Planted Tanker
Joined
·
5,980 Posts
I use 10" aquascape tweezers and do them one by one. For really tiny (thin) stems I may do 2 or 3 at once, still with the tweezers. I find it much easier to place things exactly where I want it, without having to dig holes or trenches and cover them back up. There's virtually no risk of damage to the plant and no worries about disturbing something else close by.

Unless there's already solid growth of good roots on the bottom, I usually clip a bit off up to a fresh area, and strip any leaves that would be underground. Not sure of the science behind it, it's just what I do and seems to work well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
I've used fingers, chopsticks (surprisingly effective), and pincets to plant. I also use a number of four letter words, but I can't say they helped much. Made me feel better though :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
I've used fingers, chopsticks (surprisingly effective), and pincets to plant. I also use a number of four letter words, but I can't say they helped much. Made me feel better though :)
Hahahaha, the four letter word method works wonders.

I strip the leaves around the bottom, and use my index finger to protect the stem as I drag it into place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
12" tweezers - metal ones. The best thing I ever bought. No roots don't make it harder, it makes it easier. I always trim off the roots anyway if I buy from someone else and that way it is just like you trimmed from your own tank and replanted. I only trim off leaves if the leaves are big and meaty. The smaller ones may rot but they never have caused an issue for me and the rotting probably helped fertilize the stem anyway. Tweezers will save you a ton of time too if you have a lot to plant. I have planted 150 stems in less than a hour. They also work best for small stems like Staurogyne Repens. The longer tweezer help you get around hardscape where it may be close to the glass and you can't get your hand close to the substrate. Bought mine from Greenleaf about 2yrs ago.

Its also the only way you can effectively plant stems in an already thick and growing field of stems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,934 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you all for the replies.
Graphic: this is my usual method but this time I have a couple of plants that I'm trying to nurse back to life/very small but very hard to come by and don't wish to disturb.
The main issue here is not wanting to disturb the tank any more than needed(the
substrate) as I want to keep it from looking like I changed the sub each time I plant something. I have broken stems before and lost those plants as they were trimmings and too short to do over again.
The thing that jerman83 said about getting around the hardscape is involved also
which makes me want to try what he said this time but more for precision than multiple
planting speed.
Thank you everyone who replied as it's great to have extra info to help out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
789 Posts
My Dad showed me that using the leaves will help keep plants down. So I will trim the stem up to the lower most leaves, may trim the leaves off some but leave most as they act like barbs to hold in the substrate. I use a sort of tweezers but the ends are round off and not sharp. I found this tool in an old technician tool kit at work, I think its for pulling jumpers off motherboards... Anyway I pinch the stem and drive the tweezers into the substrate, then gently release and wiggle the tweezers up and out with causes substrate to fall down in on top of the stem leaves that I trimmed.

This works great in sand type substrates may be a little more tricky in larger grain stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
My stem plants seem to rot too. All of my other plants seem to do fine it's just my stems that keep rotting. I actually think it's might be some kind of deficiency issue. I'm trying to adjust my dosing to figure it out. In the meantime I'm floating some until they grow roots.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
562 Posts
In my experience, if it's a plant that will do well in my tank (given lighting, water parameters, etc.), it will root no matter how I plant it.

If it doesn't like the conditions I provide, it doesn't matter how I plant it. It's going to die. Being more careful just means that it looks prettier while it's dying. In fact, sometimes I fool myself into thinking that the plant is doing just fine, and three weeks later I'm picking its leaves out of the water wondering where I went wrong.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top