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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used Seachem's de nitrate as a biological filter? I want to replace the ceramic rings in my AC 20 for this product, the instructions say it should be replaced to continue removing nitrates, if i don't replace them would they continue to function as a bio-filter, like the ceramic rings?

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't have high nitrates, highest i've tested just before a water change is 40 ppm, i thought of getting the de nitrate to use as a bio-filter media, both in this tank and in my planned nano reef.

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Matrix is the best way if the filter run more than 50 gallons per hour. Matrix as well works like the de nitrate. I start to use Matrix week ago - replace it in bio media , and second filter I put de nitrate ( the water run slowly than 50g/h) but for result need to wait few weeks. I hope the best.
Tad
 

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OP, as I'm guessing you know the ceramic rings don't need to be replaced just rinsed and reused. (more or less forever unless they break down somehow) The de nitrate once chemically spent would work like any other inert media as it surface area that counts.
 

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de nitrate isn't chemical filtration. It's biomedia which supposedly creates anaerobic conditions to support nitrate consuming bacteria.
Point taken but, Seachem uses the following statements on they're container;
"removes nitrates, nitrites, ammonia and organics"
"even when exhausted as an organic absorbent it continues to be an excellent support for the biological filter"
"As long as nitrate concentrations remain under control, the product is not exhausted."
(IMO) they infer the product itself removes toxins/compounds from the water not just providing surface area for the bacteria to colonize.
Rather than posting 'once chemically spent' maybe I should have posted 'plugged with crap' :icon_redf I think also they overstate/mislead on the product when they label it as "1L TREATS 100 gallons".

I bought a jug of the stuff from F&S when it was on sale. Then when it arrived came to the conclusion it's no different (or not much) than Eheim's Ehfi Substrate Aquarium Filter Media. Eheim makes no claims of the product "removing" anything in and of itself rather only that it provides surface area for the bacteria.

Quote from the Eheim packaging;

This biological filter media offers an amazing 20,000 sq. ft. of surface area per gallon

A build-up of toxic nitrogenous wastes is a natural result of all aquarium inhabitant`s life processes. In nature, the body of water is large enough to dissipate or dilute these wastes. Some will even be converted into usable energy by living organisms. Within an aquarium however, without a powerful biological breakdown of these toxins, the fish literally poison themselves. This is the reason why biological filtration is the most desirable of all aquarium filtration.

This type of filtration is the purification of the aquarium water by using living organisms, such as nitrifying bacteria. These desirable bacteria will attach themselves to all hard surfaces within the aquarium system. They use the toxins as a food, converting harmful toxins such as ammonia and nitrite into less harmful nitrate. Nitrate can then be removed by performing regular water changes.

After prolonged use, mechanical and chemical filter media will act in a biological manner. They provide some surface area for bacterial colonization but this is actually very limited. In order to provide the greatest amount of surface area for bacteria colonies, biological filter media such as EHFISUBSTRAT or EHFILAV should be used.

EHFILAV : A naturally occuring porous volcanic rock which is ideal for biological filtration where large debris is present such as ponds and highly stocked aquariums. This natural product is pre-tested for impurities before pachaging to ensure that it is free of toxins.

Posted drinking my fist cup of coffee this morning and the reason I stuck in my 2 cents was I feel like Seachem fluffs the properties of this product rather than just stating it's porous.
The response was directly to the OP's question "The instructions say it should be replaced to continue removing nitrates, if i don't replace them would they continue to function as a bio-filter, like the ceramic rings?"

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for your replies guys.
It was a very useful explanation from wkndracer, son in other words, it should function the same as Matrix or any other bio-media.

Thanks
 

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Point taken but, Seachem uses the following statements on they're container;
"removes nitrates, nitrites, ammonia and organics"
"even when exhausted as an organic absorbent it continues to be an excellent support for the biological filter"
"As long as nitrate concentrations remain under control, the product is not exhausted."
(IMO) they infer the product itself removes toxins/compounds from the water not just providing surface area for the bacteria to colonize.
Rather than posting 'once chemically spent' maybe I should have posted 'plugged with crap' :icon_redf I think also they overstate/mislead on the product when they label it as "1L TREATS 100 gallons".

I bought a jug of the stuff from F&S when it was on sale. Then when it arrived came to the conclusion it's no different (or not much) than Eheim's Ehfi Substrate Aquarium Filter Media. Eheim makes no claims of the product "removing" anything in and of itself rather only that it provides surface area for the bacteria.

Quote from the Eheim packaging;

This biological filter media offers an amazing 20,000 sq. ft. of surface area per gallon

A build-up of toxic nitrogenous wastes is a natural result of all aquarium inhabitant`s life processes. In nature, the body of water is large enough to dissipate or dilute these wastes. Some will even be converted into usable energy by living organisms. Within an aquarium however, without a powerful biological breakdown of these toxins, the fish literally poison themselves. This is the reason why biological filtration is the most desirable of all aquarium filtration.

This type of filtration is the purification of the aquarium water by using living organisms, such as nitrifying bacteria. These desirable bacteria will attach themselves to all hard surfaces within the aquarium system. They use the toxins as a food, converting harmful toxins such as ammonia and nitrite into less harmful nitrate. Nitrate can then be removed by performing regular water changes.

After prolonged use, mechanical and chemical filter media will act in a biological manner. They provide some surface area for bacterial colonization but this is actually very limited. In order to provide the greatest amount of surface area for bacteria colonies, biological filter media such as EHFISUBSTRAT or EHFILAV should be used.

EHFILAV : A naturally occuring porous volcanic rock which is ideal for biological filtration where large debris is present such as ponds and highly stocked aquariums. This natural product is pre-tested for impurities before pachaging to ensure that it is free of toxins.

Posted drinking my fist cup of coffee this morning and the reason I stuck in my 2 cents was I feel like Seachem fluffs the properties of this product rather than just stating it's porous.
The response was directly to the OP's question "The instructions say it should be replaced to continue removing nitrates, if i don't replace them would they continue to function as a bio-filter, like the ceramic rings?"

I believe this to be true also but why they(Fluval)claim it removes nitrates???
 

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I believe this to be true also but why they(Fluval)claim it removes nitrates???
Advertising for the pet market dollar would be my only guess to that.

If as FSM posted (and it appears to be the case to me as well) that it contains nothing more than inert porous bio-media without a chemical exchange in the process how can a rock (or ceramic for that matter) remove nitrates from the water column? Not all statements made by vendors are 100%. This topic would be a good one for a Seachem rep. to answer.:rolleyes:
 

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Nitrate can be removed by anaerobic bacteria. They are claiming that deep inside the bits of media there isn't much water flow so all the oxygen is depleted, producing anaerobic conditions. I've got no clue whether or not this is actually true.
 

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I don't have high nitrates, highest i've tested just before a water change is 40 ppm, i thought of getting the de nitrate to use as a bio-filter media, both in this tank and in my planned nano reef.

Cheers
I have a reef as well as a planted freshwater tank. One thing that's for sure is that when it comes to nitrates, the approach to that is totally different from the marine tank to the planted tank. I had high nitrates in my reef and despite all efforts to get it down I was only able to get them down to zero...which is the target in a reef, though not absolutely necessary when I bought a sulfur denitrifier...while at the same time, I'm actually adding nitrates to my planted tank all the time. So, be careful about being too effective when it comes to reducing nitrates in your planted tank. It not only isn't necessary to bring them to zero, that would be very detrimental to your plants.
 
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