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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Piggy backing on my last post, I had a really bad algae problem because I left my light on too long, oops! I did about a 90% water change I scrubbed all the algae out and began an excel dosing regimen. I started cycling my tank about a week ago. Last night before I cleaned my tank my readings were: ammonia: 2.0ppm, nitrite off the chart, and nitrAte 5.0 ppm. After changing my water the reading are ammonia .50ppm, nitrITe .25ppm, and nitrAte 0 pmm. I know the water change threw a dent in my cycle. Right now I have a piece of raw tilapia in a zip lock bag with holes in it floating in my tank. Why did the levels drop so drastically? What does this mean for my cycle?
 

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For fifteen gallon tank piece of fish two inches by two inches would be plenty.
Would place this piece of fish in toe section of ladies nylon with a rock to hold it down ,and place it in the tank and forget about it for next three week's.
Would reduce light intensity and number of hours to six total for next three week's.
Would add fast growing plant's as much as I could fit in the tank.
Would get macro/micro nutrient's NPK /CSM+B (EXCEL is not a nutrient).
CO2 to come on one hour before light's come on (timer's).
If no CO2 injection,then EXCEL daily as directions indicate.
After three week's ,remove what's left of tilapia in the mesh bag.
No need for water changes if no fishes.
If water begins to stink from the rotting fish(ammonia) then can change 50% without interruption of tank maturing/cycling.
Patience.
Raise the light /shade the light ,reduce intensity, and thing's will be easier.IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply. I have diy c02 so it's constantly going. I'm hooking my light up to a timer so hopefully it'll be 3 hours on, 2 off, then 3 on again. I just have dwarf hair grass and a moss right now, probably could add some more fast growing plants. Any you recommend? I had to throw out a bunch because the were infested with algae. Any recommendations with ferts? I'm using the excel to hopefully cut back on algae growth. Did the water change completely reset my cycle?
 

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Thanks for your reply. I have diy c02 so it's constantly going. I'm hooking my light up to a timer so hopefully it'll be 3 hours on, 2 off, then 3 on again. I just have dwarf hair grass and a moss right now, probably could add some more fast growing plants. Any you recommend? I had to throw out a bunch because the were infested with algae. Any recommendations with ferts? I'm using the excel to hopefully cut back on algae growth. Did the water change completely reset my cycle?
Fast grower's like Water sprite,vallisneria,anacharis,hygro's,ludwigia.
Macro/micro package of fertz from aquariumfertilizer.com.
Prime water conditioner for water changes.
Water changes won't slow down or stall development of bacterial colony to any large degree.
The tilapia will produce ammonia to feed bacterial colony, and bacteria tends to collect /colonize on hard surfaces in the tank and on media in the filter.
If no fishes present,no fish food entering the tank daily,then no need for water changes or cleaning of the filter .
Cylce as you put it, will resume.
 

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As long as there is some ammonia the bacteria will continue growing. They might slow down for a day or so until the decomposing fish produces more ammonia, but that is OK.
The water change is beneficial. The bacteria slow down when either ammonia or nitrite are over 5 ppm. It is good to do water changes when either of these get too high.
This is the benefit of using bottled ammonia: You can re-dose after a water change, and you can dose the exact amount you want. I think your dead fish is contributing too much ammonia. The ammonia removing bacteria are growing well, and are turning the ammonia into more nitrite than the nitrite removing bacteria are up to handling. So the NO2 gets too high.
This water change might be just what the cycle needs to slow down the ammonia supply for a few days and allow the Nitrospira a chance to catch up.

Monitor the conditions, and do enough water changes (frequency and volume) to keep ammonia and nitrite under 5 ppm. Don't worry about the nitrate at this point.
 

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As long as there is some ammonia the bacteria will continue growing. They might slow down for a day or so until the decomposing fish produces more ammonia, but that is OK.
The water change is beneficial. The bacteria slow down when either ammonia or nitrite are over 5 ppm. It is good to do water changes when either of these get too high.
This is the benefit of using bottled ammonia: You can re-dose after a water change, and you can dose the exact amount you want. I think your dead fish is contributing too much ammonia. The ammonia removing bacteria are growing well, and are turning the ammonia into more nitrite than the nitrite removing bacteria are up to handling. So the NO2 gets too high.
This water change might be just what the cycle needs to slow down the ammonia supply for a few days and allow the Nitrospira a chance to catch up.

Monitor the conditions, and do enough water changes (frequency and volume) to keep ammonia and nitrite under 5 ppm. Don't worry about the nitrate at this point.
I agree with much of this.
Was troubled by ammonia jump from .2 ppm to 50 ppm? or 5 ppm? after water change .
Would have thought the ammonia would be higher if fish piece was too large BEFORE water change, and would not suddenly increase from 2 ppm to 50 or 5 ppm right after water change unless maybe forgot to use dechlorinator with the large water change.
 
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