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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Spotted cyano(not 100% sure but looks like it) growing in substrate below gravel...
Is this treatable? What could have caused this?

Wood Grass Wall Shade Tints and shades
Plant Rectangle Wood Grass Road surface
 

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Can just suck it out when you do a water change, cover over it with clean substrate or treat your tank with Chemiclean... Your results may vary like everything else in the hobby.
 

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I had a bit of cyano on the substrate when the substrate was generating nitrogen. I eventually just put a soft current on it and it went away.
 

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See all the brown silt? THAT is feeding the cyano. Light? Every aquarium is bathed in light. You need light.
So clean that substrate - not just once- with every water change,clean your filter with every water change..and make weekly water changes. You could go less light..then accept less good plant growth. But cyano I can tell you can do well even in low light.
The key I've learned with cyano? Its not one and done...you have to do the things that keep it away. Less fish is one other option that works and is good for the fish left too.
 

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By clean..I don't mean 100%...just the excess mulm. Nothing drastic and should be part of weekly aquarium chores.
 

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There are other factors. Your brown silty stuff might not be the same. Look -a -likes,yes,but not the same. Inert for one,or food in the other for cyano. But over the years,I have noticed that when you combine strong light with a dirty substrate...cyano takes off.
Some kind of myth that fish tank sludge is the same as fish fertilizer. I don't think so. I can't prove with scientific facts...but I never got the feeling that fish tank sludge was good for anything. Some mulm is fine...but I bet if OP were to place a rock on top of that gravel and wait a few weeks,he might get a belch of sulphur gas when he lifts it.
I've had that happen before,especially on sand substrates..
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
See all the brown silt? THAT is feeding the cyano. Light? Every aquarium is bathed in light. You need light.
So clean that substrate - not just once- with every water change,clean your filter with every water change..and make weekly water changes.
I suspected it might come from that, the thing is I tried long and hard to get my MC to carpet, and the water column is like 7G of real volume, so idk how to vacuum properly with such low volume / without unrooting MC.
 

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I've seen ADA video on how. They used a thin stick to probe the gravel,while at the same time using those siphon tubes that are 2 or 3 inches wide to get the muck stirred up and removed. With you,jabbing at the corners and siphoning out the muck to at least get the visible cyano out is a good start.
I have sand and gravel in my big tank..and only under the sands part along the glass does cyano grow. I do as advised and that puts it off for awhile. Its taken me time to figure out how to stop cyano without reducing the light and all I've said is part of that. Really,if I had known Bosemanii rainbows can grow a heft 5" or more? I would have not used half what I have or just went to small fish. I thought 4" tops and slender...they get kind of chunky and love to eat!
They are too beautiful,easy to care for for me to change them. I just work harder to keep the aquarium clean..I went to a bigger pump,more filter cleanings,..all that.
 

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Kind of weird how it's underneath like that. I was having bad cyano growth awhile back too. I did the 4 day blackout method and it worked. Since then, no cyano. Check out my tank in my signature for progress of it.
 
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