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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Tek light system and the cable hanging kit. The kit comes with stranded cable. I've been able to cut the cable with 'crimpers' but can't figure out how to seal the end to keep it from unraveling. Does anyone know if it can be soldered? Or maybe glued? Also, I know bikes use little metal crimps on the end of the cabling and think those might work but don't know the name of them. Anyone have an idea of how to best approach this?

Thanks, bW
 

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Oh. You went there. I never botherd and just have a coil on each side. To make it clean you could use a torch and some solder. Flux will allow the solder to stick. Looks to me there is some heat applied at the factory cutting tool that spot welds the strands.

Prep by heating the tip good an hot.
Dip it in some flux.
Use enough heat at the start to be right at the melting point of the solder and wave the torch over the work area till it becomes fluid.

Be careful because the heat will draw solder quickly. You could have an inch of bonded cable in seconds.

The crimp ends fro the bicycle cables are another option but probably not as clean looking.
 

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I've heard them called monkey balls, and the crimper tool called a monkey baller. They sell them at lowes, but they will probably laugh at you if you ask for monkey balls.
 

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Him: "Excuse me, can you tell me where I can get some monkey balls?"
Home Depot: "Er...monkey wha..?"
Him: "Yea, monkey balls, so I don't have to heat up my wires..."

I can see how the conversation is gonna go. =P
 

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If you happen to have access to a portable spot welder it would be a snap. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll skip the monkey balls for now for reasons I prefer to keep to myself.


I like the spot weld idea. I do have a small welder tank for sweating pipe. I'll try it - great idea and thanks.

bioWheel
 

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Him: "Excuse me, can you tell me where I can get some monkey balls?"
Home Depot: "Er...monkey wha..?"
Him: "Yea, monkey balls, so I don't have to heat up my wires..."

I can see how the conversation is gonna go. =P
:bounce: Nice one Epic! LOL:thumbsup:

You might try some tape. BTW, I have the address and phone for Griplock Systems at work. They sent me some wires "gratis" when I wore out a pair moving my TEK up and down too much. I don't do that anymore. They were pretty surprised I was able to wear out stainless steel wire. It can be done, however.
 

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Soldering stainless steel isn't always possible. Lead based solder doesn't stick to stainless steel. You can do silver solder instead, but that is harder to do, and requires a much higher temperature.
 

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Soldering stainless steel isn't always possible. Lead based solder doesn't stick to stainless steel. You can do silver solder instead, but that is harder to do, and requires a much higher temperature.
Yes, I would recommend silver solder as well and to get the sucker HOT! Don't be afraid of mapp gas. ;)
MAPP gas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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Have you thought of using a basic hose clamp? (an adjustable metal strap)
You can find them at auto stores, hardware shops or even wal-mart. They're really cheap and you wouldn't have to worry about breaking out the heavy artillery. It's just a thought... I could be wrong.
 

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I use electrical heat shrink tubing to prevent the ends from fraying. The type I use has an adhesive, like hot glue that oozzes (sp.) out the end while being heated. Normally it seals moisture out of an electrical joint, but it really helps keep everything together in this use.
 

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I use electrical heat shrink tubing to prevent the ends from fraying. The type I use has an adhesive, like hot glue that oozzes (sp.) out the end while being heated. Normally it seals moisture out of an electrical joint, but it really helps keep everything together in this use.
Nice low tech solution. Sorry I always bring the big hammer. :icon_roll
 
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