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I have been researching like crazy about CRS and i keep getting mixed answers so heres my question.

What are the necessary water parameters to establish a breeding colony?

I know they like acidic water and have found people claiming they will only breed in the ph 6's yet I have found posts with successful breeding colonies at 7.4 which is considered slightly alkaline. Another question I have is why seachem equilibrium is often used, more often with RO water. I actually did some tests myself and found my tap water at a 7.4, my rcs tank at 7.2 and brita water in my fridge at a 6.4! Can i keep rcs with crs i know they wont interbreed but will they both be happy at 7.2?

Help with my confusion!
 

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I have been researching like crazy about CRS and i keep getting mixed answers so heres my question.

What are the necessary water parameters to establish a breeding colony?

I know they like acidic water and have found people claiming they will only breed in the ph 6's yet I have found posts with successful breeding colonies at 7.4 which is considered slightly alkaline. Another question I have is why seachem equilibrium is often used, more often with RO water. I actually did some tests myself and found my tap water at a 7.4, my rcs tank at 7.2 and brita water in my fridge at a 6.4! Can i keep rcs with crs i know they wont interbreed but will they both be happy at 7.2?

Help with my confusion!
I don't have any yet, but I'm researching as well. I think the mixed reports are because they will breed succesfully in a range of parameters, just probably not in an extreme direction of soft or alkaline.

I believe RO water needs something added to it to give it some Kh before putting it in the tank. Not sure if EQ is that product, just a guess.

When you test your tap you need to let it sit overnight first.

How big is your tank? Because RCS should be prolific breeders so room would be the only issue as far as I know. Many people mix them.

I think your PH will be fine, but I'm no expert and you might want to find out the GH and KH as well.

I think what's more important for CRS is clean and stable water conditions that don't get into the upper 70's.

Temperature is consistently the most stressed tank parameter I hear about.

I wonder about tank size as I've heard a 20 is recommended, but I may want to go smaller if I can, anyone have an opinion?
 

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I breed mine from a 5G tank. My pH is at 7.2 - 7.6. Depending on when I make water changes. I get a survival rate of 4 - 6 out of one batch. I started with 10 CRS and now have close to 80+ in 6 months.
I suspect that I might get a higher survival rate with a lower PH, however, I never tested that claim because I didn't have to. I constantly have to fish out some of them for sale as well as put them in other tanks and give to friends.
One thing I agreed on is that they are sensitive to temperature. Too hot(30 C) they died, too cold (19 C) they died as well.
 

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the reason you hear people stressing getting everything right is the price of them for higher grades. if you pay 50-100 or even more for a bunch of high grade ones you want the highest survival rate of every clutch. if you have lower grade c or b, then you may not care as much if only a lower percentage survive. i keep A and S and they are still not cheap at 10-20 each so i took the extra effort to get the highest survival rate possible. your milage will vary and i have even heard of guys (not many) successfully breeding them at 7.8 but the key is temperature (constant ~71-74). nothing else stresses them out more other than ammonia/nitirites. good luck, they are a challenge, nothing easy is appreciated for long....
 

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the reason you hear people stressing getting everything right is the price of them for higher grades. if you pay 50-100 or even more for a bunch of high grade ones you want the highest survival rate of every clutch. if you have lower grade c or b, then you may not care as much if only a lower percentage survive. i keep A and S and they are still not cheap at 10-20 each so i took the extra effort to get the highest survival rate possible. your milage will vary and i have even heard of guys (not many) successfully breeding them at 7.8 but the key is temperature (constant ~71-74). nothing else stresses them out more other than ammonia/nitirites. good luck, they are a challenge, nothing easy is appreciated for long....

I think the confusion is what the actual preferred water parameters are. What has been your experience with PH/KH/GH? I have heard so many conflicting reports and I think that's what the poster was concerned with as well. According to my water report: ph 7-7.6 GH 6.7 KH 4.4

Low ammonia and nitrite is easy for most of us to achieve. Temp. is mainly an issue of cost and convenience. And the water parameters shouldn't be hard for most people either.

If you are successful breeding them they seem like the ideal animal to keep. They don't require alot of space, you don't have to seperate the parents, etc...

Since the price remains high I can only assume they are harder to breed than it would seem at first glance. However, I wonder what it would be that makes the difference between success and failure? Breeding them seems to be shrouded in mystery.

Even the grading examples you see just have a pic with not much of an explanation as to what to actually look for besides the obvious solidness and amount of color. I'd love to see a detailed breakdown about Hino, Crown, tooth, no entry, etc...I've figured much of it out, but that's because of info in random posts, lots and lots of research for something so basic.
 

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Information is out there. You just have to read between the lines. The information I have from their natural habitat is that they come from acidic water and places where the water has very low gh and kh.

I have had CRS of different grades. I have only been able to breed the lowest grade(C) in ph above 7.4 and have a successfull colony with around 85-90% survival rate of the young. Temps were between 71-73F. I do not measure Kh and GH. Why? RO water in my case has a ph of 7.6-7.8. It has something else that is not Kh to buffer the ph.

As you get higher grade shrimp, the amount of babies they carry is less. I am not sure why. If you keep them in water that is not acidic, you will have very few surviving and I mean few. The higher grade ones in my experience are more sensitive to higher ph, temps, ect than the lower grades.

A safe ph to keep them is around 6.8. I personally think you can go up to 7.2 without problems. Keep temps between 71-75F and keep ammonia at 0. Do weekly water changes of around 20%. Kh can be low, gh can be low.
 

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aman, my tank parameters are:

ph: 6.5
kh: 2-4
temp: constant 71-72F (achieved via a chiller system)

mine seem to breed in waves, that is they all breed at once and i get flooded with babies, survival is pretty good, though the tank is so heavily planted i cant count reliably, but i get a constant supply of juvenille shrimp showing up.

had another tank of lower grade b and c (now torn down), and the ph was higher at around 7.5-7.7 and the survival rate was next to none, in fact that is the reason i tore it down as the adults simply died of old age and with no young to replace them, the population simply died out.
 

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This is all good info! Nice to hear real life experiences.

I talked with the water dept. and my tap should be around:

pH 7.2
gh 6-7
kh 4.3-4.6

So I'm thinking with aquasoil and maybe DIY co2 I should be in a nice range for the CRS. I wonder how long the aquasoil effect lasts though?
 

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This is all good info! Nice to hear real life experiences.

I talked with the water dept. and my tap should be around:

pH 7.2
gh 6-7
kh 4.3-4.6

So I'm thinking with aquasoil and maybe DIY co2 I should be in a nice range for the CRS. I wonder how long the aquasoil effect lasts though?
Those water parameters look pretty good.. Maybe lower your pH a little bit.. like by .4-.6 lol.

AS Is great. I would say let the tank stabilize for a month or so before adding shrimp. Thats just to be safe. And seeing you're just getting into CRS Don't push it.

I've stayed out of this discussion because there are a lot of conflicting facts. But in general the most important thing is a constant water condition. Now CRS in general should be continued to be kept at the breeder's water parameters for best results generally. But usually if the breeder's water is a bit harder than normal softer water is probably a good idea.

So Do what you feel comfortable with.

-Andrew
 

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my water parameter is

6.6ph
1gh degree
13kh degree

why is my kh so high? i have i wate softener in the house
Arent water softners bad for sensative fish? What do you put in yours, salt? They'll probably mes up your GH reading as well, seing how your test is saying its really soft when infact you have probably just replaced good minerals like calcium and magnesium with sodium which is bad, and your TDS is probably higher than without the softner.
 

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I have a H2O softener and have never had any problems. I never checked my TDS, either, so who knows.

Tommy
 

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yea i add salt to the water softener, i'm not sure it's my tester or it's my water. I'm gonna try to get some different testers soon. Another question is that, if the soften water goes through a 4 stage undersink R/o unit. will the condition be good for crs then?

i'm also currently doing w/c with this water with no effect to any of my fish. I'm also keeping cherries but they are not breeding as prolific as i heard they are.
 

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flounder, try to keep am, nitrate and nitrite as close to zero as possible. that rules out heavy ferts for planted tanks. they like clean clean water.
 
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