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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had succese in breeding any othe the below corys?
Would they be okay in temps 80-83f?
Any reasons you would sugest one over another?


Corydoras Schultzei Black
Corydoras sterbai
Corydoras aeneus

Oh and In thinking of ONE group of 15 of ONE species. I don't want multiple groups, at least not in the 75g maybe the 125g.
 

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I have sterbai in my 180 which regularly breed. Temps are a fairly consistent 79f, breeding usually occurs with 30-35% water changes of 76f.
 

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C. schultzei blacks are awesome! My vote goes to them. A friend of mine has lots of different cory species breed regularly after he does a big water change with the new water being cooler than the tank water.
 

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All 3 are hardy and can survive in your tank's water temperature but C. schultzei and C. aeneus won't thrive as much compared to keeping them in the 70s range. C. sterbai are a warm water fish by nature and will definitely be fine in the mid 80s range and thrive in your tank.

If you're adamant on C. schultzi and C. aeneus, I recommend lowering the water temperature to 80F just to be on the safe side.

-Epi
 

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I have a breeding group of 20 sterbai kept regularly in 80-82F water. The fry are raised at the same temperature.

I have an older group of albino aneus that have bred for me over the years, in fact there was a huge spawn by both females just Sunday. Since they are several years old now, the eggs are not viable although they go through all the motions. I've always kept them at 80-82F water without issue, including the fry.

My black shultzei breeding group is young, I have 14 at various ages, and they are thriving in the same temperature water.

In the summer months temperatures on all the tanks increases a few degrees without issue.

They are all three fairly easy to spawn. The shultzei and aeneus eggs are "stickier" and a bit easier to collect than the sterbai. With the sterbai it takes practice. I rely on a diet rich in bloodworms and white worms to keep them in top spawning condition. I have no need to do water changes with cooler water....they spawn regularly.

The aeneus and shultzei cories reach breeding maturity much sooner than sterbai. While sterbai will spawn often at under 2 years of age, the fertility rate is extremely low until they reach 2 years old.

Personality wise, I prefer the black shultzei's and albino aneous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Anyone have any experience with:

Peppered Corydoras [Corydoras paleatus]
Bronze Catfish [Corydoras aeneus]
Pygmy Corydoras [Corydoras pygmaeus]

How do pygmy's and German rams mix?
 

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Well, what parameters do you keep them in? I usually use RO water and only have 8 of them. I think I have both sexes as there are some that are fuller than others. What do you do to get them to spawn? Do you skip some water changes than do a large one? Do you add extra oxygen? Do you do multiple water changes? I have had these for quite some time and when I do water changes they get very excited and fly around the tank, but I never see any eggs being carried, or stuck to plants etc. I really would like to see some pygmy fry! Any help would be appreciated.
ty!
 

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I wouldn't recommend Pygmy's for the higher temps you mentioned earlier. If you keep your tank that warm, here's the list of warmer temperature tolerant corys from planetcatfish.com. I've tried several different varieties in a warmer tank before reading this list and lost way too many.
 

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Pygmys like a bit lower temp, no higher than 78F. The aeneus varities are very hardy at 80F. While it is not difficult to get pygmaeus to spawn, it is pretty impossible to keep the fry alive. Definitely not a fish to breed for beginners and while I have raised a lot of varieties of fish over many years and enjoy the challenege of the more rare, difficult fish, I threw the towel in on the pygmaeus. After 6 months of 100's of eggs, I was only able to get one fry to survive. I could get them over the critical hurdle of the first several weeks and then they would die. I tried everything I could think of to get the survival up but to no avail. They are THE smallest fry I have ever seen, even when compared to tiny fish like CPD's. The fry need a very established tank to feed on the microscopic life in the gravel for the first few weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
How many Bronze cory cats can I house in a 15g? They are around 1" they told me. I get them friday [aquabid].

I need to find a sutible tank for 10 of them. I either have a 15g I can set-up or a 20g tall with 17kuhlis and a betta.


Will the different color strains of aeneus or Schultzei. School together and interbred [same species]
 

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If they are the same species then they should be able to interbreed.

IMO you need to set up both of those tanks to have enough room for 10 Cories. They may be only 1" now but they'll grow very quickly when kept in good conditions. 3" is not unusual for an adult C. anaeus.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have a 75g Im planning on housing them in. But I just had to tear it down [basically] and restart as the sword melt off [emmersed] was so bad. So I got rid of the nasty water, cut the leaves off and now its much cleaner. Now I have to get it cycled again.
 

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I had great success with pygmy corys. I raised 110 to adulthood but I had all the right food cultures going and I kept my temps in the mid 70's with WC about 72 degrees. I would not keep them over 80 degrees and I would not put them in a large tank. They are very small and they do not do as well with lots of bigger fish in a large tank (particularly if you want them to breed).

Bruce
 

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Corydoras Aeneus were my first addition to my 75G tank (and remain my favorite). I inherited two from a friend and added five more from the LFS. Things were going well and they continuously bounced around happily, playing in the current and exploring the caves. About two months later, I was performing a water change and saw something tiny moving in my Java Moss. I squinted and could barely see the juvie Cory. He was nearly translucent and probably 1/4 of an inch in length. I inspected the tank every day to watch his progress and was surprised to find more and more juvies. Within a month, I had doubled my Bronze Cory population. I didn't do anything special. I let things happen naturally and the babies must have found shelter & food within my forest of Java Moss. At the time, the only other occupants were 10 Glowlight Tetra. I haven't seen any new babies since I added some Burmese Loaches and I'm thinking of relocating the loaches to their own tank.

Something I learned is that you can encourage spawning by adding slightly cooler water during your water changes. It's fun watching them spaz out and dance around the plant leaves. The Corydoras Aeneus is a great little fish...you won't be disappointed.
 
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