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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question on cory breeding - I don't know anything from experience on Cory breeding as this is my first school, so there is a big learning curve, and any advice is welcomed :)

I have 4 emerald and 2 albino corys. (Female: 1 emerald, 2 albino) (male: 3 emerald)
Will the emeralds and the albino interbreed/hybridize?
I have noticed the male emeralds following around the albino females and showing interest even though they are not the same color. They group as a single school more often than not.
Also what would this cross look like?
 

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Hi CharlieRedRock,

In genetics albino is a recessive characteristic, unless the emerald cory males have some albino ancestors the fry will typically look like the emeralds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi CharlieRedRock,

In genetics albino is a recessive characteristic, unless the emerald cory males have some albino ancestors the fry will typically look like the emeralds.
Thanks for the info. Makes sense - just wishful thinking I guess for any light green cory babies.
 

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When you say "Emerald", are you referring to Corydoras aeneus (which can have the wild/bronze coloration -commonly called "Bronze cory"- or the albino)
or are you referring to Brochis (relative of Corydoras). Brochis splendens (or another Brochis species) are often sold as "Emerald cory". Corydoras aeneus are often sold as "Bronze cory". There are a ton of other green colored Corys. Posting some pics would greatly help in identifying what species you have.

Bronze corys (C. aeneus) are the same species as Albino corys (usually C. aeneus), so they can breed together since they are the same species. Albinos just have albinism. As Seattle Aquarist pointed out, Albino is a recessive trait so Bronze x Albino = Bronze on most occasions.

Bronze corydoras (C. aeneus) will have the same body shape and everything as albinos, just with green/brown coloration.
Emerald corys (Brochis) are much taller bodied, get larger, usually have a longer/pointier snout/nose. Easy to tell apart, just look at some Google pics to get a general idea.
But again, there are a ton of green/bronze Corydoras, so a pic would better confirm.

Corydoras of different species can shoal together (especially when their group numbers are lacking or they are scared/stressed).

Just so you know, Hybridizing Corydoras (or any fish really) is HIGHLY frowned upon. Synodontis catfish species used to be pure, but many people would end up Hybridizing them and now it's hard to get pure strains. Many more reasons, but in short, it is highly recommended to not create hybrids. And just another true mention is that Corydoras do very much prefer company of their own species. Keeping more of the same species is a whole lot better than keeping few of multiple species. Yeah, they can tell the difference between each other and are a ton happier with more of their own kind (in the wild, groups are found in the the hundreds-thousands, so our measly 6-12 is nothing). I've kept a ton of Corydoras (one of my favorite fish) and have witnessed this first hand.
Again, breeding Bronze C. aeneus and Albino C. aeneus is fine since they are the same species. Though it would be preferred to breed Bronze x Bronze or Albino x Albino.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When you say "Emerald", are you referring to Corydoras aeneus (which can have the wild/bronze coloration -commonly called "Bronze cory"- or the albino)

or are you referring to Brochis (relative of Corydoras). Brochis splendens (or another Brochis species) are often sold as "Emerald cory". Corydoras aeneus are often sold as "Bronze cory". There are a ton of other green colored Corys. Posting some pics would greatly help in identifying what species you have.



Bronze corys (C. aeneus) are the same species as Albino corys (usually C. aeneus), so they can breed together since they are the same species. Albinos just have albinism. As Seattle Aquarist pointed out, Albino is a recessive trait so Bronze x Albino = Bronze on most occasions.



Bronze corydoras (C. aeneus) will have the same body shape and everything as albinos, just with green/brown coloration.

Emerald corys (Brochis) are much taller bodied, get larger, usually have a longer/pointier snout/nose. Easy to tell apart, just look at some Google pics to get a general idea.

But again, there are a ton of green/bronze Corydoras, so a pic would better confirm.



Corydoras of different species can shoal together (especially when their group numbers are lacking or they are scared/stressed).



Just so you know, Hybridizing Corydoras (or any fish really) is HIGHLY frowned upon. Synodontis catfish species used to be pure, but many people would end up Hybridizing them and now it's hard to get pure strains. Many more reasons, but in short, it is highly recommended to not create hybrids. And just another true mention is that Corydoras do very much prefer company of their own species. Keeping more of the same species is a whole lot better than keeping few of multiple species. Yeah, they can tell the difference between each other and are a ton happier with more of their own kind (in the wild, groups are found in the the hundreds-thousands, so our measly 6-12 is nothing). I've kept a ton of Corydoras (one of my favorite fish) and have witnessed this first hand.

Again, breeding Bronze C. aeneus and Albino C. aeneus is fine since they are the same species. Though it would be preferred to breed Bronze x Bronze or Albino x Albino.

Here's the pic:






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Thanks for the pic. Could you get one or two more better pics (not as blurry/reflected)? Preferably while the Cory is resting/sitting still (if you can, with dorsal fin erect). Maybe a pic of the other "Emeralds" in case this particular one just happens to have more green coverage than most.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the pic. Could you get one or two more better pics (not as blurry/reflected)? Preferably while the Cory is resting/sitting still (if you can, with dorsal fin erect). Maybe a pic of the other "Emeralds" in case this particular one just happens to have more green coverage than most.

Here I think these are better :)




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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's what I thought, thanks for the clarification. I might separate the albinos so they don't interbreed.


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It's the same species so don't worry about cross breeding or taking them out, your albino is just the albino version of your green colored Cory. They are both Corydoras aeneus.

I personally I have 12 of each in the same tank, as well as 9 other species in other tanks
 

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One of the founding members of my cory colony in my 75 was an albino. I can't even guess how many there are now after all the years since. It's only been recently after untold generations that I've seen an albino offspring. I scrape up a batch of eggs about 4 times a year to get some new fry. I'm kind of excited though, my most recent batch hatched out 2 days ago and it looks like a considerable portion of them are albino.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
One of the founding members of my cory colony in my 75 was an albino. I can't even guess how many there are now after all the years since. It's only been recently after untold generations that I've seen an albino offspring. I scrape up a batch of eggs about 4 times a year to get some new fry. I'm kind of excited though, my most recent batch hatched out 2 days ago and it looks like a considerable portion of them are albino.


That's pretty sweet. How many did you start with? How long was it from your first introduction into the tank until the first babies?
 

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I started with 3 bronze and 3 albino cories from a Petcosmartland and soon thereafter had 2 female bronze and one male albino. At that point I had intended to get some more to bring their numbers back up but life intruded...

I can't remember how long it took for them to start laying eggs after that. If you have any adults in your tank and you feed them well, they'll lay eggs about once a month. You can either wait for the storm fronts to prompt them or you can induce a spawn with a good water change and some ice.
 
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