The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Welp it's about the time of year when I start considering what to put in my giant green tub outside. It's about 20 gallons, and temps (once it warms up a bit more) range from 60-100 degrees, but during the day, usually in the 70-80's. It will be planted at least moderately heavy, and with a tiny pump for circulation.

Last year I had some Het. Formosas in there that did ok. No breeding that I could notice, but they lived. I missed being able to actually see something in the pond though, and this time, I'm thinking I want to try some fancy guppies in there, just males. I might also add some Het Formosas again, in case the gups can't handle it.

Any other fish I should consider? I'm unsure of what room I'll have when it's time to bring the fish in, but I suppose I can figure something out if/when the time comes. It would help my cause greatly if the suggested fish were pretty to a non-fish person (have to get parental permission if I want another tank).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
100 deg? The tub must not be buried. My 18g is buried and when it got to 96 deg a few days ago, its water was at a steady 79. I've kept feeder goldfish, rosy red minnows and 4 female guppies and their fry with great success.

If you think 20 gallons is giant, what would you call a small 100g container pond.. Ginormous?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
100 deg? The tub must not be buried. My 18g is buried and when it got to 96 deg a few days ago, its water was at a steady 79. I've kept feeder goldfish, rosy red minnows and 4 female guppies and their fry with great success.

If you think 20 gallons is giant, what would you call a small 100g container pond.. Ginormous?
It's only big because right now the biggest tank I have...is 7 gallons. I also have a 5 gallon, a 3/4 gallon, and I'm debating tearing down a 2 gallon. I do small tanks. :hihi:

You're right though, it's not buried, and gets some sunlight throughout the day. I also live in a near-desert, so hot days, cooler nights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
It's only big because right now the biggest tank I have...is 7 gallons, 5 gallon, 3/4 gallon, 2 gallon. I do small tanks. :hihi:
That would explain everything :icon_lol:



If it isn't too much trouble for you, just bury the tub. My 18g tub is about to get replaced by another 30g tub from Home Depot. It too will be buried.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If it isn't too much trouble for you, just bury the tub. My 18g tub is about to get replaced by another 30g tub from Home Depot. It too will be buried.
Part of the problem is I'm living in an apartment and there's not enough room in my flower beds to bury it. I'm also not quite sure when I'll be moving, but I'm guessing I'm moving sometime soon. It may be in a month. It may be in 3 months. I figured I could manage to move the (partially drained) pond and fish together, should that happen, since it's just a very large pot. I'm rather poor at planning ahead. It may all go terribly wrong. :icon_redf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Killies!

Then they would look AMAZING from all that natural sunlight when you bring them in for the winter.
I've never had killies before, but I've heard they're bad jumpers (stunningly beautiful though). What types? What do they need? Where do I get them? My LPS has the bare minimum types of fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Honestly, if I were looking at moving in such a short time, I'd forgo the container pond until I got to the new home and saw what my options were. Not what you want to hear, I imagine, sorry. :(

Or maybe you could set up the pond with just plants for now? It will be a lot easier to break down and move with no fish involved, and less worry for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Honestly, if I were looking at moving in such a short time, I'd forgo the container pond until I got to the new home and saw what my options were. Not what you want to hear, I imagine, sorry. :(

Or maybe you could set up the pond with just plants for now? It will be a lot easier to break down and move with no fish involved, and less worry for you.
That is the logical and rational answer. I'm just very ready for it to warm up and be able to enjoy being outside. I'm also assuming that when I move back home, I'll be allowed to set the pond up again, so it's nice to have some options to think about.

...and I really really want a fish other than Het. Formosas...I'm getting bored with them, as charming and entertaining as they are
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
That is the logical and rational answer. I'm just very ready for it to warm up and be able to enjoy being outside. I'm also assuming that when I move back home, I'll be allowed to set the pond up again, so it's nice to have some options to think about.

...and I really really want a fish other than Het. Formosas...I'm getting bored with them, as charming and entertaining as they are
Hence why I suggested the Mosquito Fish. Most pond fish are hardy enough that if you moved, they could tolerate being in a smaller tank for a few weeks until you are able to set up a new pond. Mosquito Fish are extremely tough, think koi/goldfish tough, and would be able to go in a ten gallon or something similar to that, until you were able to set up the container again. They can be very beautiful fish in the right light, and their colors are neutral, giving a calming effect to a small pond, especially amongst the plants.

And unlike most pond fish, they won't eat your plants ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hence why I suggested the Mosquito Fish. Most pond fish are hardy enough that if you moved, they could tolerate being in a smaller tank for a few weeks until you are able to set up a new pond. Mosquito Fish are extremely tough, think koi/goldfish tough, and would be able to go in a ten gallon or something similar to that, until you were able to set up the container again. They can be very beautiful fish in the right light, and their colors are neutral, giving a calming effect to a small pond, especially amongst the plants.

And unlike most pond fish, they won't eat your plants ;)
That's pretty much the argument I'd give for the Het formosas. I've never met a more hardy fish, a more subtly pretty fish, or a fish that is more determined that all other fish are female and willing. I still like them, but I could go for some bright bold color. I'll keep skeeter fish in mind though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
I'm getting ready to set up a 150g rubbermaid in the next week or so, now that temperatures are rising and starting to get more stable (40s last week, 80s this week) Last year I had silver hatchets and black phantoms...I think this year, I'll go for floating plants and guppies, maybe something a little more exotic, but I'm not sure yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
I switched from Guppies and White Clouds to Rosy Red Minnows and I couldn't be happier. I don't have to spend 5 minutes trying to see if they are even still alive anymore. 2nd best thing to having goldfish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Do Rosy reds, or maybe some kind of bright platy like orange. Varitus platys are much more tolerant of cold temps, but I'm not sure if they can handle the heat you described.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top