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Hello!

New to the forum although I've been lurking and reading alot for the past couple month.

Now, I have a 60 gallon tank, 48x12x25, that I have been redoing. Attempting to go for a mountainess/ravine planted tank thats carpeted. I replaced my substrate awhile back and now looking into co2. I am also using a fluval canister filter.

I have no idea where to begin with co2. The parts are more confusing to me the more I read. Even if I were to buy a kit, I have no clue one to the other. Hoping for great clean growth, and only having to replace the tank once every couple months.

Picture for reference so far (everything has been cycled and I turned one rock upside down since). Thank you!
Water Vertebrate Fluid Organism Pet supply
 

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the easiest method to inject co2 is using an inline diffuser. it attaches to the filter's output and disperses co2 mist as far as your filter can push it. downside is that your tank will be filled with the mist resulting in an aquarium that some have called a 7up tank. another way is to use an intank diffuser. you'll get mist but not as bad as the inline. finally, you can buy/build an external reactor. no mist, but have to make some changes to your plumbing. for more information, check out dennis wong's excellent site the 2hour aquarist
 

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I think it is better to grow some easy plants before you decide to advance with co2 injection.
it takes time and observation to understand how to run a planted aquarium and enjoying the process, but if try to do everything all at once without too much experience, you may welcome frustration.
 

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AFA tanks, my 10 lb tank lasts me 6+ months on my 75g. One thing you must do before you invest is to find someplace that will refill your tank. A lot of places will only do an exchange/tank rental. You didn't mention your budget. I've had good luck with the system from Aquarium Plants, but it is expensive. I've heard good things about CO2 arts for a modestly priced system. You don't want to go cheap. Mine came with an external reactor which I highly recommend if you're running a canister filter. It takes a while to get everything balanced (light, CO2, fertilizer), but it's usually trouble-free once you do.

Here is a photo of my 75g with the CO2 system
 

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I told myself I'd never get into co2 and that I liked a low tech setup. I changed my mind and decided to try it but like you I was confused as to the equipment and whether I wanted to invest the money into it.

I HIGHLY advise anyone who thinks they want to get into co2 to try a cheaper method such as the Aquario Neo co2 kit.


It's cheap and effective and the results may motivate you to use or not use co2. I get about 6 to 8 weeks out of "packet" depending on room temperature/season.

I've since switched to an actual regulator and tank but I still have a couple aquarium co2 bottles in smaller shrimp tanks.
 

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before getting involved with CO2, you have to consider a budget. Are you looking to spend quite a bit on a full fledged regulator and controller and use an industrial sized CO2 tank? Many will. However, in my home office, it would be visually distracting to have a full sized tank that I cannot fit under my tank stand. I researched "mini-regulators" and there are several out there. I went with the FZone mini-regulator that comes with a solenoid which is nice since you can connect the solenoid to a timer to go on and off with your lighting. One of the other main selling features for me is that you can connect the FZone mini-regulator to a full-sized CGA CO2 tank, a Paintball canister, or a 90g disposable CO2 cartridge. I purchased (2) brand new 24oz Paintball canisters and get them refilled for less than $6 at a major sports shop. With a good Bubble Count rate, I always get more than 30 days CO2 until the next refill. This is the setup that works for me along with a stainless steel diffusor. A reactor is the best of course but I am fine with using the diffusor method with a circulation pump, in my case I purchased a Koralia pump to allow more CO2 to flow through the tank instead of losing much going straight up to the surface. I purchased the FZone mini-regulator for about $100. NOTE that CO2 paintball canisters have a 5 year life; either you have to stop using them after 5 years or you can pay to have a company recertify the seal on a CO2 canister for another 5 years.
 

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CO2 has a bunch of terms that will be new to you plus some scary warnings about fish death if you set it up wrong.

There are a lot of videos on YouTube for setting up CO2. I suggest doing some searches over there.

But basically there are 3 main parts. A regulator which is basically a nozzle that attaches to a bottle of compressed gas and determines how much gas comes out at any one time. There is a tank/cylinder which holds the CO2. And the last piece is where the CO2 gets injected into the water. This will be either some type of diffuser or a reactor.

Most of Somewhere between 60 and 90% of the cost of getting into CO2 is spent on the regulator. Best bang for your buck for an off the shelf regulator is the co2art one. Most of the rest of the expense is buying the gas cylinder. Most diffusers are pretty cheap. And most reactors are diy made from pvc plumbing parts. Diffusers are definitely easier to use but better for small tanks. A 60 gallon should really be running a reactor. I'd look into a rex griggs style reactor with a bypass so long as cutting a cementing pvc doesn't bother you.

Good luck!
 

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I’ve had my Milwaukee MA957 Regulator for over 5 years on my 75 gallon works perfectly haven’t had any problems and it’s only about 85$ on amazon. Using co2 is a little expensive when first setting it up but it doesn’t have to be crazy my set up cost me a little over 200$.. 85$ for the regulator, 75$ for a 5lb tank, 25$ for a drop checker/checker fluid and probably another 25$ for a diffuser and co2 airline. The 5lb tank lasts me about 3 months for my 75g and costs 15$ for a refill at a welding supply store. Using co2 is easy just get yourself a drop checker and a timer from the hardware store to use with the regulator set the timer to turn on 2 hours before lights go on the fish tank and to turn off 1 hour before lights out. Slowly add co2 to the tank until you get a lime green color in the drop checker as long as the checker stays green and doesn’t turn yellow before the co2 shuts off at night then your basically dialed in. You will also need to feed your plants .. I ei dose micros and macros on alternating days Mon-Sat and do 50%water changes Sunday. Here’s a picture of my 75g it was my first ever aquarium and I started with co2 from the beginning and it’s still going strong. 💪🏼

Plant Plant community Water Pet supply Vegetation
 

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Hello!

New to the forum although I've been lurking and reading alot for the past couple month.

Now, I have a 60 gallon tank, 48x12x25, that I have been redoing. Attempting to go for a mountainess/ravine planted tank thats carpeted. I replaced my substrate awhile back and now looking into co2. I am also using a fluval canister filter.

I have no idea where to begin with co2. The parts are more confusing to me the more I read. Even if I were to buy a kit, I have no clue one to the other. Hoping for great clean growth, and only having to replace the tank once every couple months.

Picture for reference so far (everything has been cycled and I turned one rock upside down since). Thank you! View attachment 1036247
Hi there,

Setting up a high energy aquarium for the first time can be a little confusing for everyone so don't worry. The main thing is that you choose a system that your comfortable maintaining. If you can set it up and understand it, you will feel much more confident in the long run.

The regulators available on our website are designed for aquascapers of all levels but if I were to recommend one, it would be the Pro SE model. It is compatible with all of our diffusers so depending on your preference, you will have no issues with the installation.

As a member of the Planted Tank Forum, you receive a 15% discount on all purchases made via our website. When deciding on which diffuser to use, ask yourself whether you would like to have the diffuser visible in your aquarium or would you prefer to have something that is outside of the aquarium to maintain a minimalist look and have more focus on your aquascape?

If you would like my suggestion, I would recommend using an inline diffuser. Your idea of a mountainous ravine style aquascape would be best presented without any equipment in the aquarium spoiling the view.

Both our regulators are designed to connect directly onto fire extinguishers with a CGA connection without the need to use any adaptors. You should source a reliable supplier of CO2 who can either provide you with replacement bottles or refill them whenever you need it.

Id be happy to put together a kit for you including the discount mentioned above and email it over to you. Sometimes it can help having it all together and in front of you.

Send me a DM if you want to find out more.
 
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