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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand what each of the components on a CO2 system does and how they are put together... I think.
Bottle> Regulator> Solenoid> Diffuser.
How do you precisely regulate the bubbles of CO2 into a tank i.e. via a bubble counter? Does the regulator itself do this? Or is there a fine adjustment needle valve somewhere?

If I have two tanks on one bottle the single regulator can’t regulate Both tanks, right?
You must be able to “dial in” each tanks specific CO2 requirement.
What am I missing here?
Thanks in advance!
 

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The regulator brings the operating pressure down from an enormous >800 PSI to something more usable 20-50 PSI.

You forgot an important component - the needle or metering valve, after the regulator and solenoid. This is the critical component controlling the flow that you measure with the bubble counter (or flow meter).
 

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To answer your original question, if you have two metering/needle valves, then you can regulate two aquariums independently of one another. However, if you keep just one solenoid, the flow of gas will turn off on both aquariums at the same time.

For recommendations, my CO2 Primer (linked in my signature below) provides a few part numbers. the NV-55-18 and 52-1-11 come to mind
 

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If you want to DIY there are guys here like Bettatail that will help you out. Same guys can also build a system for you, just tell them what you’re looking for and trust that it will get done right. I have done this a few times already!
 

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If you want to DIY there are guys here like Bettatail that will help you out. Same guys can also build a system for you, just tell them what you’re looking for and trust that it will get done right. I have done this a few times already!

Care to elaborate on this? My first co2 system was a diy setup and it required constant adjustment. Now that I have a pressurized system, I'm so much happier with the results
 

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If you want to DIY there are guys here like Bettatail that will help you out. Same guys can also build a system for you, just tell them what you’re looking for and trust that it will get done right. I have done this a few times already!

Care to elaborate on this? My first co2 system was a diy setup and it required constant adjustment. Now that I have a pressurized system, I'm so much happier with the results
Sorry, I did not mean to suggest DIY yeast based CO2. I meant DIY building your own CO2 regulator for a pressurized CO2 system from parts that you may find on eBay, or other places online like diyco2regulator.com, or even in the for sale section of this group. If this type of DIY doesn’t appeal to you or if you don’t want to put the time into it, in addition to the commercial offerings from places like greenleafaquariums.com and co2art.us, you could PM one of the guys on this forum (like bettatail or flowerfishs) to build one for you. In your case you would need a manifold with two outputs for your two tanks. I just commissioned one such system with 3+ outputs from bettatail.

Hope that helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Guys,
Thank you for the information. Sorry for the delay...
Can you talk a little about the commonality of threading between components? I don’t mind getting an adapter off the main regulator to the check valve/needle valve but I don’t want to cobble every piece together with different sizes and adapters.
So is there a common size associated with planted tanks etc.?
 

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Guys,
Thank you for the information. Sorry for the delay...
Can you talk a little about the commonality of threading between components? I don’t mind getting an adapter off the main regulator to the check valve/needle valve but I don’t want to cobble every piece together with different sizes and adapters.
So is there a common size associated with planted tanks etc.?
1/8" NPT and 1/4" NPT are the most common. Regulators typically tend to have 1/4" outputs, so you'd need an adapter there.



From there, you'd just keep everything at 1/8", and convert between male/female as needed (e.g. perhaps your metering valve is female ended, but your solenoid is also female ended; you'd need a male/male connector to bridge the two). You could try looking for a metering valve that had a male end, but sometimes, it's easier just to get an extra fitting.
 
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