The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Dosing is one of the areas of planted tanks that has always eluded me, and in the past I was always much more focused on the fish side of things. This time I really want to nail the planted part.

My first question is how do I decide when/if I need to dose my tank? I have a 5g low tech set up with ADA Aquasoil that is still cycling. I wasn't planning on dosing until after it cycles, everything settles, and I get a better idea of what I'm working with. Except for the fact that I don't know what to look for.

I'm not doing anything crazy, varieties of Java moss, anubias petite, crypt wendtii, and microsword, plus a few background plants and moss eventually.

The only stock this will have is a betta. Because of the size and proportions of this tank, my goal is to maintain as little algae as possible, since I can't have a cleanup crew and manual maintenance is already going to be a nightmare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
Could be a couple month's in low tech ,lower light, before any additional nutrient's may be needed other than what the aquasoil provides.Maybe longer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,020 Posts
Keep it low light and you will not really have to add any ferts. My current 75g hasn't had any ferts in close to a year. I have very minimal algae too and decent growth.

I moved recently and the water out of the tap is much harder. The plants are having a touch time adjusting but I think it will be alright.



Sent from my SM-N900W8 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Yeah also agree, keep it low light and it should not be a real issue. Have something similar I use for my fry for the first couple of weeks. Aquasoil and some kind of cheapo led light above it, looks a lot like your tank but a bit smaller. Aquasoil as well. Got anubias petite in it and some fast growing stem plant I don't remember. Doing great without any ferts and growing in a steady pace. Though I have 10 red bee shrimp maintaining it as well. Guess you could do the same? Not sure if the betta will eat them though?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
ADA Aquasoil can provide most, if not all nutrients for a year or so, but after that you may want to start dosing very lightly. The more light you have, the faster the plants grow, and the faster the aquasoil runs out of some nutrients, especially nitrogen.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,942 Posts
I agree with the others about dosing. Not much to do for a while especially with low light. Things to do are basically water changes and keeping the light on a tight leash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yeah also agree, keep it low light and it should not be a real issue. Have something similar I use for my fry for the first couple of weeks. Aquasoil and some kind of cheapo led light above it, looks a lot like your tank but a bit smaller. Aquasoil as well. Got anubias petite in it and some fast growing stem plant I don't remember. Doing great without any ferts and growing in a steady pace. Though I have 10 red bee shrimp maintaining it as well. Guess you could do the same? Not sure if the betta will eat them though?
I wish I could have shrimp, but unfortunately the only ones available here are opae, since shrimp could easily invade our waterways. The opae only breed in brakish and are extremely invasive already, and they dont do the best clean up job. I tested a few with my betta, but he had a field day and quickly dispatched all of them.


I was wondering about Flourish Excel, if that could have any benefit for this tank?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
671 Posts
I have similar plants. At water change time, I inspect the plants (if I remember). If the anubias starts to loose it's deep green color and begin to turn yellow or get holes in the leaves, I dose. If the crypts start to melt or have weak growth, time to dose. I'm very casual, but try to be mindful of what I observe. I use Flourish, potassium, nitogen and phosphorus at the beginner levels. If things look bad, I add a half dose of Excel (I've had a bad overdosing experience with Excel,so I am a little scared of it).

Here is a handy chart to help you see what to look for Freshwater Plants: Nutrient Deficiencies - AquathusiastAquathusiast
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top