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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I noticed this morning that there were no CO2 bubbles in my tank, and the drop checker was showing mildly blue. Took a look at my regulator, and saw the high pressure side was reading regularly at 800 psi, but the low/working pressure side was 0. If I increased the working pressure dial all the way, I got about 10 psi, shown in the photo below. I saw another thread about a similar issue, but I know it's not a broken gauge because when I opened the regulator to max, still read 0 flow on my flowmeter.

Anyone open these things up? I got this about 3 months ago, so not sure if it's still under warranty, if it has a warranty. Paging @JohnCO2Art
 

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We now live in an era where we often need to stop and ask a few questions before deciding. I have no idea if this is a reg problem or not but I might ask about the blue area on some things.
Is the blue some type of sealer, some type of other coloring on things, or just a reflection? If it is sealer, it seems to be a potential problem when not done that well.
I need to be sure what it is I'm seeing before comment?
 

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We now live in an era where we often need to stop and ask a few questions before deciding. I have no idea if this is a reg problem or not but I might ask about the blue area on some things.
Is the blue some type of sealer, some type of other coloring on things, or just a reflection? If it is sealer, it seems to be a potential problem when not done that well.
I need to be sure what it is I'm seeing before comment?
I think the blue is reflection.

common problem of piston design, is easy to get stuck..
diaphragm design has no such problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
send it back to co2art, should be under warranty.
if out of warranty, you can open it, clean and lube the piston valve and replace the oring(if necessary).
We now live in an era where we often need to stop and ask a few questions before deciding. I have no idea if this is a reg problem or not but I might ask about the blue area on some things.
Is the blue some type of sealer, some type of other coloring on things, or just a reflection? If it is sealer, it seems to be a potential problem when not done that well.
I need to be sure what it is I'm seeing before comment?
It was indeed just a reflection of my light screen. Thanks guys!
 

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It was indeed just a reflection of my light screen. Thanks guys!
Okay, good to know it is not a factor, so from there it would seem to be a question of warranty or lubing a bit. There are times when just lube works but I would say it can also be things that are not quite as well machined as might be and those can be hard for us to sort out as we don't have the real precision stuff to tell if a part is touch out of round or has a small burr in just the wrong spot, so I would check for what the company might suggest doing BEFORE taking it apart.
My first thought was that some blue sealer might have gotten down into the works and fouled the process! Maybe I need to cut back on using blue Loctite? Sorry about that idea. :grin2:
Maybe, just to be sure, a check that there is not a major leak inside the low pressure meter would be good?
Most meters have a small, very thin item called a bourdon tube that flexs to let the meter hand move and if too much pressure hits the low meter, it can blow this tube open and then gas can come out in weird places like the back or around the glass where we might miss it when doing a leak check with bubbles.
https://www.britannica.com/technology/Bourdon-tube-gauge
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Okay, good to know it is not a factor, so from there it would seem to be a question of warranty or lubing a bit. There are times when just lube works but I would say it can also be things that are not quite as well machined as might be and those can be hard for us to sort out as we don't have the real precision stuff to tell if a part is touch out of round or has a small burr in just the wrong spot, so I would check for what the company might suggest doing BEFORE taking it apart.
My first thought was that some blue sealer might have gotten down into the works and fouled the process! Maybe I need to cut back on using blue Loctite? Sorry about that idea. :grin2:
Maybe, just to be sure, a check that there is not a major leak inside the low pressure meter would be good?
Most meters have a small, very thin item called a bourdon tube that flexs to let the meter hand move and if too much pressure hits the low meter, it can blow this tube open and then gas can come out in weird places like the back or around the glass where we might miss it when doing a leak check with bubbles.
https://www.britannica.com/technology/Bourdon-tube-gauge
Good to know! I'll make sure there is no leaking happening when I get back home, think I got it solved though. Ended up opening it up because I didn't want to be without CO2 for however long it would take to get it repaired, lubing it and putting it back together, so it's working right now!
 

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checking for leaks is always a good thing to do any time we open the line or do any major moves as it does happen and the leak can be very sneaky.
Part of the problem is that we get so used to looking at gauges and assuming they will let us know when the tank is going down. NOT TRUE for compressed gas gauges, as they do not read levels but pressure and will not show we are losing gas while the re is still liquid left to become gas and keep the pressure up!
so what folks may get into is looking at the gauge and seeing 800PSI or some number and not spot that it doesn't change, except for minor temperature effects, until we have lost nearly the whole tank of CO2. Then once we get down to all the liquid turned into gas, the pressure does start to move down progressively---but that's not until we've already lost most of the tank!
Sorry, you may already know that but I feel it's always worth mention!
Reason for me to mention now is that part about getting a reading when you do turn the pressure full up. If you had a blockage, the added pressure should not increase the reading but if there is a pretty big leak in the meter, a certain amount may be going out the leak and increased pressure may force the meter hand to move a bit.
Not saying that is the true picture, just more a headsup to check, just to avoid blowing through a tank needlessly? Just lots of small points to confuseus.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
checking for leaks is always a good thing to do any time we open the line or do any major moves as it does happen and the leak can be very sneaky.
Part of the problem is that we get so used to looking at gauges and assuming they will let us know when the tank is going down. NOT TRUE for compressed gas gauges, as they do not read levels but pressure and will not show we are losing gas while the re is still liquid left to become gas and keep the pressure up!
so what folks may get into is looking at the gauge and seeing 800PSI or some number and not spot that it doesn't change, except for minor temperature effects, until we have lost nearly the whole tank of CO2. Then once we get down to all the liquid turned into gas, the pressure does start to move down progressively---but that's not until we've already lost most of the tank!
Sorry, you may already know that but I feel it's always worth mention!
Reason for me to mention now is that part about getting a reading when you do turn the pressure full up. If you had a blockage, the added pressure should not increase the reading but if there is a pretty big leak in the meter, a certain amount may be going out the leak and increased pressure may force the meter hand to move a bit.
Not saying that is the true picture, just more a headsup to check, just to avoid blowing through a tank needlessly? Just lots of small points to confuseus.
I'm a chemical engineer by trade so I'm pretty familiar with pressure systems! But your point is well founded. CO2 is pretty cheap but I still like to avoid blowing through a whole tank needlessly haha!
 

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Remove the regulator from the canister, peel off the sticker on the back of the regulator. There's a big flat head type screw, unscrew it and clean out the chamber/blow it out with compressed air/swab it with rubbing alcohol then reassemble. I had the same issue and that fixed it right up.
 

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Hi guys,

I noticed this morning that there were no CO2 bubbles in my tank, and the drop checker was showing mildly blue. Took a look at my regulator, and saw the high pressure side was reading regularly at 800 psi, but the low/working pressure side was 0. If I increased the working pressure dial all the way, I got about 10 psi, shown in the photo below. I saw another thread about a similar issue, but I know it's not a broken gauge because when I opened the regulator to max, still read 0 flow on my flowmeter.

Anyone open these things up? I got this about 3 months ago, so not sure if it's still under warranty, if it has a warranty. Paging @JohnCO2Art

@pyoinator The Pro-se has a 5 year Warranty. I would strongly recommend before going ahead next time just to drop an email to [email protected] just to make sure that you will be ok carrying out any repairs. The last thing you want to do is void the warranty :wink2:
 

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@pyoinator The Pro-se has a 5 year Warranty. I would strongly recommend before going ahead next time just to drop an email to suppor[email protected] just to make sure that you will be ok carrying out any repairs. The last thing you want to do is void the warranty :wink2:
It would be pretty silly of them to have customers voiding their warranties.

https://www.co2art.us/pages/support...ot-changing-working-pressure-29ed539f57041a05

It won't void their warranty, I have since gotten a replacement plunger for the solenoid under warranty AFTER performing the above fix.
 

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It would be pretty silly of them to have customers voiding their warranties.

https://www.co2art.us/pages/support...ot-changing-working-pressure-29ed539f57041a05

It won't void their warranty, I have since gotten a replacement plunger for the solenoid under warranty AFTER performing the above fix.
Hi Guys, What JP is explaining is that we strongly advise that you contact us prior to performing such a procedure to avoid accidently damaging the regulator. This type of damage would not be covered by warranty in such a case. We just want to make sure any faults are fixed in the best possible manner.
 

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Hi Guys, What JP is explaining is that we strongly advise that you contact us prior to performing such a procedure to avoid accidently damaging the regulator. This type of damage would not be covered by warranty in such a case. We just want to make sure any faults are fixed in the best possible manner.
I'm truly not trying to be crass or obtuse, but why have the directions publicly on the web site asking regulator owners to perform the maintenance operations in question if it's recommended they don't perform said maintenance before contacting support?

I always try to figure out problems, within reason, before having to contact support which is why I performed the cleaning of the rear chamber which alleviated the identical issue the OP is having.
 

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I'm truly not trying to be crass or obtuse, but why have the directions publicly on the web site asking regulator owners to perform the maintenance operations in question if it's recommended they don't perform said maintenance before contacting support?

I always try to figure out problems, within reason, before having to contact support which is why I performed the cleaning of the rear chamber which alleviated the identical issue the OP is having.
This is one area where figuring out how to deal with the public is not ever going to be easy and very prone to being wrong! Sometimes there is very little true way to deal with the user because that user varies so much. One person can look at directions, follow them and get good results, so it makes sense for a company to post those directions. But then along comes the person who has no knowledge or ability to take things apart and follow directions! That person makes us wish we had never suggested they get close to our equipment with any kind of tool, as they take it apart, lose a vital piece or cross thread something to ruin and then tell us we should not have told them to do it! They may even charge us with neglect for not telling them to turn it counterclockwise before they turned it clockwise to remove the fitting!
Being responsible has to be a cooperative effort and both sides have to do their part to get things to work!
Since I feel most people working for most companies DO try, when I hear of complaints, I'm kind of prone to looking at what the new user may have done wrong before saying the company making the item is wrong.
I often find new users may be honest in trying but new does mean there is extra room for things to go wrong?
 

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This is one area where figuring out how to deal with the public is not ever going to be easy and very prone to being wrong! Sometimes there is very little true way to deal with the user because that user varies so much. One person can look at directions, follow them and get good results, so it makes sense for a company to post those directions. But then along comes the person who has no knowledge or ability to take things apart and follow directions! That person makes us wish we had never suggested they get close to our equipment with any kind of tool, as they take it apart, lose a vital piece or cross thread something to ruin and then tell us we should not have told them to do it! They may even charge us with neglect for not telling them to turn it counterclockwise before they turned it clockwise to remove the fitting!
Being responsible has to be a cooperative effort and both sides have to do their part to get things to work!
Since I feel most people working for most companies DO try, when I hear of complaints, I'm kind of prone to looking at what the new user may have done wrong before saying the company making the item is wrong.
I often find new users may be honest in trying but new does mean there is extra room for things to go wrong?
All very good points. And I'm genuinely not trying to be rude when asking - this is where text sucks at conveying tone.
 

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All very good points. And I'm genuinely not trying to be rude when asking - this is where text sucks at conveying tone.
Yes, know what you mean.It's really hard to get across exactly what we mean and it's one of the things, I'm really bad at doing, especially now with wearing a mask. We are so used to part of communications being looking at the other person's face and trying to read how they are receiving what we are talking about.
Just a simple deal with walking past the guy you've worked with for years can get totally different, depending on the look on our face.
We've all been there and we know how to say things and get different reactions.

"take that idea and stick it!" :grin2: may go over fine with the guy you know or
"take that idea and stick it" :icon_mad: may not go over too well at all with the same guy
Life's difficult! !
 

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I'm truly not trying to be crass or obtuse, but why have the directions publicly on the web site asking regulator owners to perform the maintenance operations in question if it's recommended they don't perform said maintenance before contacting support?

I always try to figure out problems, within reason, before having to contact support which is why I performed the cleaning of the rear chamber which alleviated the identical issue the OP is having.
The article you shared is not instructions to open up the regulator like you advised pyoinator. We don't publically show instructions to open up the regulator. This is something we only discuss with a customer. JP is explaining that it is always a good idea to speak with us first because doing such a procedure and damaging the regulator as a result, could void your warranty.

Best advice to anyone, if you have any issues at all just drop either myself or the support team an email.
 

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The article you shared is not instructions to open up the regulator like you advised pyoinator. We don't publically show instructions to open up the regulator. This is something we only discuss with a customer. JP is explaining that it is always a good idea to speak with us first because doing such a procedure and damaging the regulator as a result, could void your warranty.



Best advice to anyone, if you have any issues at all just drop either myself or the support team an email.
Fair enough. And you have my sincerest apologies if I seemed rude. That really wasn't the intent.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 
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