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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am confused, there are some people who claim that silicone tubing is the worse type of tubing to use with CO2 systems. However many online dealers (http://www.drsfostersmith.com/Product/Prod_Display.cfm?pcatid=9933&N=2004+113779) and co2 sites (http://www.qsl.net/w2wdx/aquaria/diyco2.html#3) recommend the use of silicone tubing. So I would like to inquire on what type of tubing you use (silicone, vinyl, other). Also any links containing information the differences would be helpful. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the link. BTW, I did not ask the question in the previous post. I only supplied info on the type of tubing that I was using on my DIY CO2 system at the time. And the vinyl tubing that I was using ended up hardening and caused a leak from my DIY CO2 system (3-2liter bottles). Now that I am planning on using a 10lb CO2 canister, I want to make sure that I use the correct tubing.
 

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I'm going to assume that silicone is fine for small setups since Rex has it on his DIY bubble counter.
 

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net loss is proportional to the area of the membrane, which is proportional to length of tubing. so, short runs of silicon should be no big deal.
-snafu
 

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Thanks for the link. BTW, I did not ask the question in the previous post. I only supplied info on the type of tubing that I was using on my DIY CO2 system at the time. And the vinyl tubing that I was using ended up hardening and caused a leak from my DIY CO2 system (3-2liter bottles). Now that I am planning on using a 10lb CO2 canister, I want to make sure that I use the correct tubing.
(I just thought it was funny that you posted something similar two years ago, nevermind my comments)

There is that number flying around -- 6% loss per ft of silicone tubing. If that is right (I am sure it depends on many things) then say 10ft will cause a loss >50%. So you have the trade-off between CO2 loss (silicone) and shorter lifespan (vinyl). With DIY CO2, it is very important to get the most out of your bottles into your tank. Therefore, I would give the nod to vinyl, and just replace it once in a while.

I have a pretty long run (15-20ft) of vinyl tubing, and so far it has held up well (1.5 years). It's cheap, so I can replace it easily if there should be a problem.

Of course you could go all the way and get some good CO2 proof tubing. I think Rex sells it at a reasonable price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I actually would not have remembered about the earlier post if you would not have mentioned it. LOL, but then again I don't even remember what I had for breakfast today. However, I am assuming that my vinyl probably had issues do to the fact that I was using DIY yeast solution. I will assume vinyl will be safe for a pressurized system since you have been using it for over a year.

I am still curious as to why dealer like Fost&Smith offer CO2 tubing with their kits.
 

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This is gonna sound like it's off topic, but it's not, so please bear with me...

I bought a commercial water level sensor not long ago. It was one of those type that you drop a hard plastic tube in the tank, and the hard tube is connected to silicon airtubing, which is connected to a pressure sensor. When the water goes up or down, the air in the tube is compressed or expanded - changing the air pressure in the airline tubing, which is sensed by the pressure sensor, which turns things (like a fill pump) on or off.

I was taking real detailed measurements, and day in, and day out, the tank had to be filled higher and higher for the senor to register it as "full". So I orderd some of Rex's CO2 tubing, and replaced the 8' of silicone airline with his tubing. The change in day to day readings changed RADICALLY. The rise in the sensor's percieved "full" level got MUCH more consistent. Why?

My personal conclusion is that the vendor supplied 8' section of silicone tubing leaked a wee bit of air every day, so it took an increasingly high water level to set of the sensor. With Rex's leak free tubing replacing it, that leaking stopped, and the senor became, immediately, MUCH more accurate.

My conclusion - silicone airline tubing has slow leaks under even low pressures, and Rex's stuff does not.

It ain't airtight proof. But it is a solid piece of evidence.
 
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