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Discussion Starter #1
Quote:
Above 2%, carbon dioxide may cause a feeling of heaviness in the chest and/or more frequent and deeper respirations.
Toxic levels of carbon dioxide: at levels above 5%, concentration CO2 is directly toxic. [At lower levels we may be seeing effects of a reduction in the relative amount of oxygen rather than direct toxicity of CO2.]

Source:
http://www.doomedglobe.com/Pages/co2_toxicity.htm

At normal oxygen level, 7% co2 concentration can be lethal, and the OSHA standard for lethal dosage is 10% concentration within 30 minutes.
At lower oxygen level the effect of co2 poisoning is much stronger on human body.

5lb co2 in a 12'X12'x9' room is 5.15%.
air density is 0.075lb per square feet at 70 degree, in a room of 12'x12'x9', is 97.2lb.
97.2lb(air)-5lb(air been pushed out)+5lb(co2 from 5lb co2 tank)=97.2lb(mixed air)
5lb(co2)/97.2lb(mixed air)X100%=5.15%
over the toxic level

In a smaller room the concentration is higher.


Recently a lot of fellow members build their own co2 pressurized system, while building or after the system is built, CO2 safety is really important and must be kept in mind. AND MAKE SURE YOUR CO2 SYSTEM IS 100% FUNCTIONAL AND HAS NO LEAK.

Personally, it only take less than 2 hours to build a system if all parts are ready, but takes up to two weeks for a different series steps of test to make sure the unit is 100% functional and no leak.
And I keep the house windows open when playing with new systems.
Hope you do the same if you are building a co2 system.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Keep in mind that most rooms are not hermetically sealed, and that CO2 is denser than air so will naturally flow out through gaps between the door/floor, vents, etc.
+1, if you see your dog or cat acting wired while you are playing with co2 equipment, open the windows or the door immediately.
 

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How do you test your regulators after assembling Bettatail? I have read on one of the regulator companies site that if reassembling a regulator it should be tested using helium by a certified technician. Do you just run co2 through them when testing or do you use helium as they suggest?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, also beware of deadly dihydrogen oxide!
You are talking about the most plenty deadly substance on earth?!!!!
:icon_eek:

for any of you don't know what it is, please google it, "dihydrogen oxide poisoning"

The whole section of people, about 10 of us, fell for the "dihydrogen oxide poisoning" during safety brief in April, 2005. :icon_sad:
 

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Good article pointing out that rushing and not paying attention could lead to a problematic situation. Also, for pressurized CO2 systems be sure to secure the tank in some way to avoid it being knocked over and causing damage in some way.

Yes, also beware of deadly dihydrogen oxide!
If it gets on you get a towel immediately and contact a doctor ASAP :).
 

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A battery powered C02 detector for $18 on Amazon is well worth the money ;-)
 

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Yes, also beware of deadly dihydrogen oxide!
You can mix it with Scotch and counteract the effects, unless you have high doses which can result in vomitting, blurred vision, and poor judgement or in extreme cases death.:icon_roll
 

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Discussion Starter #11
How do you test your regulators after assembling Bettatail? I have read on one of the regulator companies site that if reassembling a regulator it should be tested using helium by a certified technician. Do you just run co2 through them when testing or do you use helium as they suggest?
Helium test is for the highly toxic gas service equipment, this standard of leak test is to prevent leak, normally down to molecule level. co2 is not highly toxic gas, and I can't measure how many co2 molecule escape from the system.:biggrin:

the safety issue here is the co2 concentration in enclosed environment. the proper operating procedure is pretty much the same as any welding shops, properly handle high pressure equipment, prevent frostbit and "keep the windows open", so co2 concentration can not reach to the level that cause trouble. :)
 

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Helium test is for the highly toxic gas service equipment, this standard of leak test is to prevent leak, normally down to molecule level. co2 is not highly toxic gas, and I can't measure how many co2 molecule escape from the system.:biggrin:

the safety issue here is the co2 concentration in enclose environment. the proper operating procedure is pretty much the same as welding shops: "keep the windows open", and co2 concentration can not reach to the level that cause trouble. :)
I guess I'm confused then because in your first post you said that co2 levels above 5% concentration can be toxic. I have read more than a few threads on this forum where people were having co2 leaks from there system and I don't see how this small amount could pose a problem unless you have your tank setup in a closet that is sealed up with duct tape.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I guess I'm confused then because in your first post you said that co2 levels above 5% concentration can be toxic. I have read more than a few threads on this forum where people were having co2 leaks from there system and I don't see how this small amount could pose a problem unless you have your tank setup in a closet that is sealed up with duct tape.
in enclosed environment, leaked co2 can not escape and concentration will rise.

about the 5% toxicity, the detail is in the provided link, very interesting article.

It is the dose that kill, any substance can be toxic if give the proper amount, so as dihydrogen oxide, a poisonous deadly substance. :biggrin:
 

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So what we have is a warning about a hazard that doesn't exist in normal use, based on information from an internet article whose URL includes "doomed globe" written by somebody who is likely a nut?
Isn't the internet a place to get some wonderful information to pass around to anyone would needs another worry? ?

If I ever hear of a planted tank fan being struck down by his CO2, then I might worry. But NOT if the info comes from the internet!
 

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There is a real caution that should be made aware but not alarming. Especially if you keep your house closed up in winter and summer. It concerns the pilot light in the water heater. If there's a high enough co2 gas leak and if the co2 has nowhere to vent to the outside it will pool in your basement. With enough co2 in your basement the pilot light can be snuffed out creating a gas leak. So, If you smell something bad and you've been tinkering with the co2 tank, don't blame the dog, go check the waterheater pilot light. And if you smell something bad at night don't flip on any light switches.

I once vented a nearly empty co2 tank in my living room and did snuff out the pilot light.
 

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So what we have is a warning about a hazard that doesn't exist in normal use, based on information from an internet article whose URL includes "doomed globe" written by somebody who is likely a nut?
Isn't the internet a place to get some wonderful information to pass around to anyone would needs another worry? ?

If I ever hear of a planted tank fan being struck down by his CO2, then I might worry. But NOT if the info comes from the internet!
Thank you!
I don't buy into the "sky is falling" type of nonsense being posted here. CO2 poisoning is only going to happen in an absolutely sealed environment, a perfect example is a space ship capsule (Apollo 13).

The MSDS's are written with BULK storage in mind. Your tiny portable tank is a pipsqueak in comparison to industrial scale vessels. Below is from work: it's 350 gallons of liquid argon, something to be respectful of. A little 10lb CO2 bottle certainly has a lot of destructive / hazardous potential but let's keep that in perspective.


http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/pHosting.php?do=show&type=f&id=12235&title=bulk_vs_portablec.jpg
 

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Here is a video demonstrating how some industries use CO2 as a fire suppressant system.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q303E9mLujQ

Note the amount of gas that is being released, and also the fact that the camera man just remains in the room for the entire video duration. No problem.
 
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