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Title says it all, GLA isn't shipping until end of December and I need a new one asap. Price doesn't really matter, I just want high quality. Are the UNS pro systems solid these days? I do remember reading something negative about them a few years back.

https://ultumnaturesystems.com/co2/

Any other recommendations? I have a toddler and a baby so learning how to build one myself is going to be impossible due to zero free time:D

Thanks!
 

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Appreciate it. I may have found the issue. The area where I screw the CO2 regulator to the bottle, am I supposed to have some sort of rubber seal there? I don't have one....

Is something like this all I'd need?

https://greenleafaquariums.com/products/brass-permaseal.html[/quote @TheLordOfTheFish - it depends on which GLA regulator you are running. Some of the GLA regulators use a nylon seal.

I do not know where you live or if you have access to a local Praxair or other CO2 supply company but, if you do, I'm sure they would have whatever you need to get hooked up and running. If you go this route remember to bring your setup with you to the supply house.

Hope this helps!

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I've never use the permanent seal as I just keep getting the nylon at the welding gas supply where I get tank refills, they usually just lay a few out on the counter when I mention it but the price is something like 25-50 cents.

This is an Airgas ad but they tend to be higher around me.

https://www.airgas.com/product/Gas-...Hlm_0wzd_l_MzyDZUbK8L_NwY26PSu-QaAtJiEALw_wcB
I use the "Permaseal" and love it, but never had a problem with the nylon washers either.

In my experience, both work just fine.

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You always want a vinyl (?) washer unless you permaseal, which I wouldn't recommend. I can't remember off the top of my head but there's something about CO2 and rubber that doesn't work out right.

For future reference, if you want a cheap, quick alternative to industrial regulators or custom built, look at the home-brew sites. The last one I bought was from Austin Home-brew and was like 90 bucks shipped. I think a lot of the Airgas and other regulators most people recommend are over engineered for our usage IMO, especially since "hobby" regulators are all rated/certified for the gasses they're intended to be used with. Unless your home is 100º you're not going to surpass safe operating pressure. Plus, they're designed to do damn near exactly what we do with them.

Don't get me wrong, a shiny industrial regulator is a nice piece of equipment but if you're looking for decent quality at a low price point (Mr. Right-Now instead of Mr. Right) then check that out. Most come already equipped with the CGA 320 nut already. I'm using a Harris right now on my 5# with no complaints. If you're using a solenoid you can also get away with a single stage regulator and save a couple bucks while increasing your options because you're heading off EOTD at the pass.
 

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You always want a vinyl (?) washer unless you permaseal, which I wouldn't recommend. I can't remember off the top of my head but there's something about CO2 and rubber that doesn't work out right.

For future reference, if you want a cheap, quick alternative to industrial regulators or custom built, look at the home-brew sites. The last one I bought was from Austin Home-brew and was like 90 bucks shipped. I think a lot of the Airgas and other regulators most people recommend are over engineered for our usage IMO, especially since "hobby" regulators are all rated/certified for the gasses they're intended to be used with. Unless your home is 100º you're not going to surpass safe operating pressure. Plus, they're designed to do damn near exactly what we do with them.

Don't get me wrong, a shiny industrial regulator is a nice piece of equipment but if you're looking for decent quality at a low price point (Mr. Right-Now instead of Mr. Right) then check that out. Most come already equipped with the CGA 320 nut already. I'm using a Harris right now on my 5# with no complaints. If you're using a solenoid you can also get away with a single stage regulator and save a couple bucks while increasing your options because you're heading off EOTD at the pass.
I generally agree with this in that most any type CGA 320 washer will be made of the correct material, so from there it gets into what you want and find. I have no real idea of what the white material is but since it is what is made for CGA320, I go with it being the right material and I use them for years without changing them out. Part of how long they last each of us seems to be how we treat them. If we are of the mindset that we want to crush it fully each time, they don't last as long as they do get crushed! Tight enough to work but not so tight it kills the washer!

But I do question the solenoid part on avoiding the EOTD as the solenoid only cuts flow when the power is cut to it. It does nothing to monitor the tank CO2 if it is not used with a PH controller, etc. That means if we are not using some form of controller and only a timer, the solenoid does not cut flow if it becomes too high during an EOTD.
Sometimes the devil is in the details!
 

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I generally agree with this in that most any type CGA 320 washer will be made of the correct material, so from there it gets into what you want and find. I have no real idea of what the white material is but since it is what is made for CGA320, I go with it being the right material and I use them for years without changing them out. Part of how long they last each of us seems to be how we treat them. If we are of the mindset that we want to crush it fully each time, they don't last as long as they do get crushed! Tight enough to work but not so tight it kills the washer!

But I do question the solenoid part on avoiding the EOTD as the solenoid only cuts flow when the power is cut to it. It does nothing to monitor the tank CO2 if it is not used with a PH controller, etc. That means if we are not using some form of controller and only a timer, the solenoid does not cut flow if it becomes too high during an EOTD.
Sometimes the devil is in the details!

Rich you’re absolutely right on all accounts. On the washer, my father always taught me “1/4 turn past hand tight is sufficient” and you don’t want to crush your gaskets. As long as you’re not leaking you’re good to go.

Thanks for mentioning the solenoid too. I had my physics all jacked up and had a dunce moment lol. What I really meant was a needle valve plus solenloid. So in essence a whole after body kit. As long as you have some sort of mitigating measure post body (which again as a dunce I assumed) you’re golden.


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