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Discussion Starter #1
Built this last week, pretty happy with it because it is the first functional high output pressure regulator system that I built.
Virtually all major components are Parker:
Parker IR6000 regulator with 250 psi max output,
Kip/(Parker skinner) stainless steel solenoid.
Parker HR metering valve with turn counter handle.

the notable item and the reason I post this system is the new found Kip stainless steel solenoid, it is only 1.5watts, and 300psi max holding pressure, and, two outlet ports. Because of this solenoid, it is the first system that I build with 250 psi max output pressure.





 

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Discussion Starter #4
Do I see brass??
🤑
:grin2:
can't find a matched pair complete stainless steel gauges, but the weiss gauges are stainless steel cases.

Nice. Can you "clock" that solenoid at the 9 and 6 positions?
because the position of the outlets on the solenoid, I arrange the postbody in this style to save the fittings, if you think other arrangement of the postbody will look better, I will try it again, probably this weekend.

a couple more pictures.


 

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Technically, if the outlet isn't at ATM then the tube should be reversed to put the metering valve on the outlet side, not inlet. Like if using in line or diffusion disc. Suppose it's fine for reactors. Not exactly sure why, but that's the recommendation as I understand it.

Never mind, seems they changed that a bit.....
Or not..??
https://store.mathesongas.com/rotameter-guide/

Should I have the valve on the inlet or the outlet of the rotameter?
The valve should be on the inlet when the gas is to be used at atmospheric pressure. The valve should be on the outlet if there is a vacuum or varying pressure downstream.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Technically, if the outlet isn't at ATM then the tube should be reversed to put the metering valve on the outlet side, not inlet. Like if using in line or diffusion disc. Suppose it's fine for reactors. Not exactly sure why, but that's the recommendation as I understand it.

Never mind, seems they changed that a bit.....
Or not..??
https://store.mathesongas.com/rotameter-guide/
float control valve at the outlet side is for flow rate monitoring under specific pressure setting(pressure in tube other than atmosphere pressure).
float control valve at the inlet side is for flow rate monitoring under normal atmosphere pressure setting(pressure in tube is 0 psig, gauge pressure, or, 14.7 psia, atmosphere pressure)

and the porter/parker flow meter in the picture is capable to reverse the inlet/outlet by turning around the glass tube.

if use this flowmeter with reactor, the valve should be at inlet side because the pressure to push co2 into reactor is close to atmosphere pressure, and if use with higher back pressure type diffuser, the valve on flowmeter should be on the outlet side because the pressure inside the tube can be adjust to a specific number according to the flowmeter manufacture.

when you mention matheson rotameter I think you are on the right direction but the details can be found in this page, for flowmeter FM1050, you can check flow rate(air) of different model of glass tubes, under different pressure setting, different floating ball material. BTW, the tube models useful to us are 610A, 600, 601.
http://www.mathesongas.com/gas-handling/flow-measurement/flowmeter-calibration-600
 

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This is my first that I threw together...it'll be used on my upcoming 32g tank that I'm currently building a stand for. Yes it has brass. No I don't care. It's going to be hidden under my cabinet so who gives a crap. It was a lot cheaper using brass too. Also, I used a barb because when I ordered the parts they were out of stock of the push fittings. Had I known I was going to take almost 2 years to get this tank up and running I would have waited. But at the time I was thinking I was going to get it done asap. I may replace it later. I might not if it works with no issues.

 

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Discussion Starter #10
This is my first that I threw together...it'll be used on my upcoming 32g tank that I'm currently building a stand for. Yes it has brass. No I don't care. It's going to be hidden under my cabinet so who gives a crap. It was a lot cheaper using brass too. Also, I used a barb because when I ordered the parts they were out of stock of the push fittings. Had I known I was going to take almost 2 years to get this tank up and running I would have waited. But at the time I was thinking I was going to get it done asap. I may replace it later. I might not if it works with no issues.

nice regulator! make sure it is no leak and you can start the co2 for the plants :)
 

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alan, that is a nice arrangement of the valves.
There is plenty of time right now, to put together some more nice exhibition grade custom co2 systems. :)

I ran out of parts lol. Did you customize the 10-32 nut to fit the 1/8 tube needle valve?


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Now you guys are just showing off! I really enjoy seeing the configurations to both keep consistent material types (stainless steel) and to keep the components as compact as possible.
 

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Betatail what do you think of this one? It came with the reg.


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Betatail what do you think of this one? It came with the reg.


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https://www.kofloc.co.jp/kofloc_e/p..._id=515&product_id=441&filename=copy_2412.pdf


https://www.kofloc.co.jp/kofloc_e/product/detail.php?type=2&category_id=515&product_id=441

https://www.kofloc.co.jp/kofloc_e/product/list.php?type=2&category_id=515


Needle id should be on there..hopefully..

Bump:
Now you guys are just showing off! I really enjoy seeing the configurations to both keep consistent material types (stainless steel) and to keep the components as compact as possible.

Prefer.. (well sort of) my steampunk versions.. ;)
 
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