The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
1029057
I have a 65 gallon JBJ all in one that I plan to add CO2. I have two return pumps in the sump with 1/2 inch tubing. I think I have enough space to add the diffusers, but wondering if I’m missing anything. Would it work if I just put it one inline diffuser in or would I need two? I can also get a single return pump and put a Y on it although I might run out of space since it’s a 22 inch aquarium in height. Another option is to have the diffuser in the sump area next to the intake of the return pump...

thanks for the help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
View attachment 1029057 I have a 65 gallon JBJ all in one that I plan to add CO2. I have two return pumps in the sump with 1/2 inch tubing. I think I have enough space to add the diffusers, but wondering if I’m missing anything. Would it work if I just put it one inline diffuser in or would I need two? I can also get a single return pump and put a Y on it although I might run out of space since it’s a 22 inch aquarium in height.

thanks for the help.
I have a similar but smaller setup (40G). Definitely one difuser (if you decide to go diffuser way). 2nd brings no value. Just be ready to see a full display side of micro CO2 bubbles. I found no way around it. I played with over the counter reactors in the sump compartment (ista mix) but they were always too loud after some time and never provided enough CO2. I ended up with an external filter in addition to sump and connected a diffuser to the outline of the filter. The outline goes into the sump (overflow part) through a few layers of filter flosses (so no microbubbles make it to the display section through sump pump). Some say those microbubbles of CO2 are beneficial to plants but I do not like the appearance. Regarding the number of pumps, I have 1 pump through a ball valve and T-fitting at level of nozzles but more flow is better.
Hope it helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a similar but smaller setup (40G). Definitely one difuser (if you decide to go diffuser way). 2nd brings no value. Just be ready to see a full display side of micro CO2 bubbles. I found no way around it. I played with over the counter reactors in the sump compartment (ista mix) but they were always too loud after some time and never provided enough CO2. I ended up with an external filter in addition to sump and connected a diffuser to the outline of the filter. The outline goes into the sump (overflow part) through a few layers of filter flosses (so no microbubbles make it to the display section through sump pump). Some say those microbubbles of CO2 are beneficial to plants but I do not like the appearance. Regarding the number of pumps, I have 1 pump through a ball valve and T-fitting at level of nozzles but more flow is better.
Hope it helps.
Thanks for the reply. Was the reason you didn’t just put the inline diffuser on the outline tubing of the return pump the bubbles in your display tank? Would you happen to have a picture of your setup. Did you go with a canister filter in addition to the sump filter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
I had a JBJ 20 gallon AIO and I put Tom Barr’s internal Venturi reactor design in the pump section and it worked great. You can control the mist by the amount you inject, worked excellent for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all for your feedback. I’m wondering if I could throw in a diffuser right next to the return pumps and that might be the easiest route. It would help disperse the CO2 across the entire tank this way. Has anyone tried that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Thank you all for your feedback. I’m wondering if I could throw in a diffuser right next to the return pumps and that might be the easiest route. It would help disperse the CO2 across the entire tank this way. Has anyone tried that?
I have tried that in both an all-in-one and cabinet sump and didn't have much luck. Whatever I tried, most of the bubbles seemed to go up rather than get sucked into the pump.

I think the internal venturi @Mr.Shenanagins mentioned might be your best bet with an AIO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have tried that in both an all-in-one and cabinet sump and didn't have much luck. Whatever I tried, most of the bubbles seemed to go up rather than get sucked into the pump.

I think the internal venturi @Mr.Shenanagins mentioned might be your best bet with an AIO.
@Mr.Shenanagins Sounds like I need to do some more research on these. Essentially, I could put this in the pump area, run the CO2 to the reactor, run the return pump tubing to the reactor to mix with the CO2 and then the outbound line would then go back to the tank? Am I understanding that correct? Do I need to buy a diffusor for inside the reactor? Does something like the below work?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Yup that’s the one. Simple and effective.

Also, if I remember correctly, I attached the pump to the side of the viewtainer so that I could suction cup the pump to the wall of the sump. The vortex is actually much better this way to because the 90 degree angle output is flush with the wall of the container coming through the side at the top. Hope that makes sense. I can give you a visual if not just let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Being a beginner, it’s a little difficult to visualize. I also have a pump that is a 396 gph flow rate. The co2 reactors that I’ve seen are only rated for 1000L or 264 gallons. I’m wondering if that is going to pose an issue. I’d really like to buy something that is ready to go as I have two young kids that demand a lot of time. There aren’t a ton of options out there for CO2 reactors...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6 Posts
Thanks for the reply. Was the reason you didn’t just put the inline diffuser on the outline tubing of the return pump the bubbles in your display tank? Would you happen to have a picture of your setup. Did you go with a canister filter in addition to the sump filter?
Yes, I tried attaching diffuser in the sump and it will fill the display section with bubbles that you could barely see anything. I tried Tunze co2 reactor and was not able to tweak to have enough CO2 and not to have occasional burst of bubbles. I had Ista reactor (similar to the one listed by another person here) and same thing. Would either burst some bubbles or have a built up of CO2 and have no saturation after that. I did reactor myself but still was not able to tweak it and not to either lose flow significantly or have bubbles.
Below is how I have the pump and canister setup:
1029129

1029130

1029131

The canister will take water out on left far corner of the display, on the outflow tube of Eheim there is a diffuser, and the outflow will go into far right corner of sump. All the micro bubbles will be trapped by filter floss in that sump column. Then the return pump from sump will return water into main compartment. I also have a Vortech MP10 on the low right front of the display just for changing some flow patterns. The pump in the sump has a straight up tube, then T-joint, 2 straight pieces into two L-elbows that came with the nozzles. This is probably not the best setup but I have zero CO2 bubbles in the display and everything is dead silent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Yes, I tried attaching diffuser in the sump and it will fill the display section with bubbles that you could barely see anything. I tried Tunze co2 reactor and was not able to tweak to have enough CO2 and not to have occasional burst of bubbles. I had Ista reactor (similar to the one listed by another person here) and same thing. Would either burst some bubbles or have a built up of CO2 and have no saturation after that. I did reactor myself but still was not able to tweak it and not to either lose flow significantly or have bubbles.
Below is how I have the pump and canister setup:
View attachment 1029129
View attachment 1029130
View attachment 1029131
The canister will take water out on left far corner of the display, on the outflow tube of Eheim there is a diffuser, and the outflow will go into far right corner of sump. All the micro bubbles will be trapped by filter floss in that sump column. Then the return pump from sump will return water into main compartment. I also have a Vortech MP10 on the low right front of the display just for changing some flow patterns. The pump in the sump has a straight up tube, then T-joint, 2 straight pieces into two L-elbows that came with the nozzles. This is probably not the best setup but I have zero CO2 bubbles in the display and everything is dead silent.
I appreciate you showing your setup. I don’t have a lot of extra room, so I’m trying to keep everything in the sump area. I’m now looking into creating something like the Rex reactor.
Or like emotionalfescue had recommended.

Quick question that I was hoping you all could help me out with. When people talk about the DIY Venturi loop CO2 reactors, they often say external or internal. Does that mean external or internal to the tank? Silly question, but one I couldn’t find an answer to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Quick question that I was hoping you all could help me out with. When people talk about the DIY Venturi loop CO2 reactors, they often say external or internal. Does that mean external or internal to the tank? Silly question, but one I couldn’t find an answer to
Internal means that the reactor is INSIDE the tank or sump. Attached is the one I made for my sump.
45310A90-01D7-449D-96B7-98BD344039A3.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
did that one work out well for you? I just bought a 2” x 10” clear pvc that I’m going to try and use as my reactor in my sump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
I remade it using a viewtainer container but yeah works great. You should hit optimal levels pretty fast. Mine takes longer and I use more CO2 with an actual sump, the AIO is more efficient in terms of keeping CO2 in the water column
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I remade it using a viewtainer container but yeah works great. You should hit optimal levels pretty fast. Mine takes longer and I use more CO2 with an actual sump, the AIO is more efficient in terms of keeping CO2 in the water column
Hoping it works works well. Did you just drill a hole into the intake of the pump and stick the tubing in there or is there a nipple in the pump you attach it to for the Venturi loop?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I have a 210 gallon with sump and 1 CO2 inline diffuser running into a whole house water filter used as CO2 diffuser in such a way as there are NO CO2 bubbles in my display tank. it's at my office and I'm at home so I can't take pictures, but I used ideas from Tom Barre's website:

HOWEVER, the author's water flow direction through the whole house filter is wrong! IMHO. if the flow is reversed from the attached the diagram then the water flows into the diffuser and down the length of the cannister into the pipe at the bottom and then out to the tank. The intake to the tank is from the bottom of the cannister where the water is already saturated with CO2 with no bubbles. I used a taller thinner whole house water filter cannister to make sure flow could not push bubbles into the outflow tube. I added plastic bioballs to add turbulence but they proved unnecessary. Also this design is NO maintenance. No sponges to replace or anything to get clogged.
 

Attachments

1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top