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Our tanks get optimal co2 from the DIY or pressured co2 systems. how about the natural world, i'm sure that some lakes have wonderful ground coverage with beautiful plants and all. but where do they get the co2 needed?
 

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Here are two more processes that could attribute to it in water
-Directly from natural carbon dioxide springs, where it is produced by the action of acidified water on limestone or dolomite.
-From thermal decomposition of limestone, CaCO3, in the manufacture of lime, CaO;

limestone is often found around lakes and streams (as well as everywhere else lol) around here, so I could see that process occuring.
 

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I found this thing and it's actually got a lot of cool info.

http://tellus.ssec.wisc.edu/outreac.../Minifact_Sheets/Minifact6_Carbon_Dioxide.pdf

Average Carbon Dioxide Amounts in a good freshwater pond-

Time of Day ppm

6 am 23ppm
9 am 16ppm
12 pm 9ppm
3 pm 6ppm
6 pm 3ppm

"All aquatic organisms release this gas into the water. Some of it bubbles to the surface, some of it dissolves (mixes in) with the water, but most of the carbon
dioxide found in the water is produced by organisms (bacteria mostly) that carry on decomposition of dead material."
 

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"All aquatic organisms release this gas into the water. Some of it bubbles to the surface, some of it dissolves (mixes in) with the water, but most of the carbon
dioxide found in the water is produced by organisms (bacteria mostly) that carry on decomposition of dead material."

That's actually very interesting, and gives rise to another (if not so pleasant) way to create CO2. Package up all of your leaf debris and the like and let it decompose in your tank. :hihi: Besides the smell, i wonder if there would be a problem with doing that?
 

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The comparison is not really apples to apples. In nature, in any habitat the organisms that thrive are compatible with the environment (co2 being just of the many factors).

In a tank, the whole setup is artificial. The organisms might not be best suited for the naturally available setup you got. The plant or fish you are keeping might not get what it gets in its natural environment (and needs) just by putting it in water with some soil beneath. So you need to artificially supplement the requirements (again co2 is just one of them)
 

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Eutrophication refers to the increase in nutrients in a body of water, not necessarily due to decaying matter (i.e. phosphates from laundry detergents used to be a source of eutrophication).
 
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