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I've never enjoyed using gel. But I've found using high quality brewer's yeast works well. I have a bunch of fancy CO2 setups sitting around but still occasionally use DIY on smaller tanks when necessary. Mine usually run for 4 or so months before they need changing - that's if I do nothing. But if you maintain them and feed them properly (tough to find a balance)? They can go closer to a year.

If you want to try gel, I think you should just buy it. Way easier.

Note: some manufacturers tell you that CO2 production drops off dramatically after a day of using yeast (and that's why you should use their gel) but that's almost never been the case for me when using good yeast from a brew shop.
 

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I have been thinking of adding co2 to my kitchen tank. Definitely interested in what you come up with.

Was looking into this today and found these two videos. Very similar recipes, seems easy enough. Using better yeast as @somewhatshocked suggests has got to help as well.



I've seen people sell regulators for 'diy' co2 kits on amazon, I wonder if its feasible to use that with one of these tanks to control co2 production, or is that a recipe for disaster?


Edit: Ummm... you know.... looking at how things are done. I seriously wonder if I can make lager as my 'by product' of adding diy co2 to my tank.......... thoughts?
 

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Lol, I'd be interested in seeing you try. I have no background in beer brewing. I've done my fair share of diy co2 and I've been giving the dennerle bio co2 a shot. It's a gel form and was thinking about just reusing the bottles. Found a little pressurized nano kit for $20 clearance at a going out of business sale. I really should update my old threads better. My conclusion is much the same as most others as far as my experience with diy co2... Much better off with quality materials. Still would save me a ton of money in comparison to ordering refill kits for the dennerle, though. No matter how you try diy co2 as diy co2, whether you ads the extra steps of gel or not. It did well the first 2 weeks, then it was inconsistent.
 

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Lol, I'd be interested in seeing you try. I have no background in beer brewing. I've done my fair share of diy co2 and I've been giving the dennerle bio co2 a shot. It's a gel form and was thinking about just reusing the bottles. Found a little pressurized nano kit for $20 clearance at a going out of business sale. I really should update my old threads better. My conclusion is much the same as most others as far as my experience with diy co2... Much better off with quality materials. Still would save me a ton of money in comparison to ordering refill kits for the dennerle, though. No matter how you try diy co2 as diy co2, whether you ads the extra steps of gel or not. It did well the first 2 weeks, then it was inconsistent.
I'm totally going for the beer co2 method ;P I will probably start my own thread just for that once I get er going.

I was doing some research on different beers and came to various levels of conclusion. The first was that 1) most beers do their primary fermentation (where they produce co2) in like 14 days or less. 2) beers that take much longer to do this like lagers generally speaking need to be kept cold (like refrigerator temperature cold) which is essentially impossible for my purposes. I know almost nothing about brewing so with the intention of learning more I went down to my local homebrew store today for what I told myself would be information gathering and maybe.. maybe, buying a really small amount of stuff so I could give this a try.

Met a nice and very helpful fellow there and ... uh, kinda got upsold. I'm going to be doing some crazy stuff and see if I can stretch the 14 day maximum to something like 4 to 8 weeks.

 
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