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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently just changed my co2 diffusion from a hagen fluval plus 1 chopping up into a fine mist to something else. I bought a rio 180 and tried to build a reactor with it like tom barr's design. Instead of using a viewtainer, i used a "clear can". Pretty much same thing just different brand my local lowes's carries. I couldn't build it and i mess up cause the container was a piece of junk that just cracked on me. Bad knock off product i'd say. So here I am, with no co2 at the moment. I have pressurized co2 and i didnt like that i had to constantly change out the filter pad in the fluval internal filter so dirt doesnt build up. It is a pain to take the whole thing out and clean it every week or two.( it gets dirty fast.) I know have the rio 180 which serves me no purpose at the moment, makes way too much current for my 20 gallon, and I can't return it to the lfs because it was used, so I'm out the money for it. It is also very loud for me to listen too.

What should i do? I just want some great diffusion for my 20 gallon. I have 65 watts pc and NEED good co2 diffusion.

Should i just use a glass diffuser and get great results??

The materials i have now are filter sponge, check valves, tubing, rigid tubing, silicone, rio 180 powerhead, fluval plus one filter, and some suction cups. Is there anything i can do or make with those materials? Please save me!!

EDIT: I just put the co2 back on connected to just a nano glass diffuser for the meantime while trying to find an answer
 

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The 2nd one doesn't look too bad, why it isn't all the much less than what you would pay for something from a reputable place like GLA. I use their 3000 diffuser and like it quite a bit.
 

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They mostly dissolve. It is not 100%, but it easy easy to hit my target on the drop checker with about 2 bps.

I do have a small koralia in the tank but it is on the opposite end. It is used to remove the deadspot on the far end of the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ok and if i use the rio 180 i have for movement because i'm sure i can use it, it will help distribute the co2 mist but is there anyway i can reduce the flow on it? The flow is beating up on the fanwort and startling my 2 rams.
 

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I never splitted co2 into 2 lines before, but i think a brass t-valve should work fine. I think you might need 2 needle valves after the brass valve.
 

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ddtran46 is correct; to split your CO2 into two lines, you will need two needle valves after the T.

If there comes some point where you want to have CO2 in 2 different aquariums (rather than in the same tank), you may want two solenoids so that you can control the CO2 flow to each tank independently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ok so now i'm very intrigued for splitting my co2 into two lines. I have a milwaukee regulator so it already has a needle valve. I have it so it releases co2 about 2-3 bps. Now lets say the co2 is going to the diffuser like normal but i disconnect it and attach it to a t-valve, then attach a needle valve to each new line. Now what? Do i have to attach a new bubble counter after each new needle valve to help measure the co2 rate? do i adjust the regulator needle valve first and then the other two next or do i do something different? I'm confused on how to set it up but I'm am very interested. Hope I worded myself properly and someone understands my question.
 

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The easiest way to setup a two way split (with minimal incurred costs) is to take the needle valve, bubble counter and solenoid off the regulator.

Starting from the CO2 tank, the next piece you will have is the regulator.

Following this, you will have your split (i.e. CO2 manifold).

Following the manifold, you can opt to put solenoids in (or not).

After the solenoids (or after the manifold, if you chose not to use solenoids) comes your needle valves.

Next will be your bubble counter(s), if you choose to use them.

Finally, these will go to your reactors/diffusers.
 
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