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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone link me a check valve that they use and have good luck with? I was using the brass check valves and they always end up failing to the point where they don't let any pressure through in the correct direction.
 

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They all end up failing at some point. The longest lived I've had was a Dennerle check valve. An ADA cabochon ruby or something similar should last indefinitely. Short of that, I would just use the cheap plastic valves and replace them on a regular basis before they have a chance to fail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Honestly I'm less worried about failure where water passes back through the valve and more irritated by the failure where no co2 can flow in the correct direction. I had the brass ones that they sell on Amazon. My bubble counter has a built in check valve to prevent water from reaching the solenoid (much higher quality).
 

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Can anyone link me a check valve that they use and have good luck with? I was using the brass check valves and they always end up failing to the point where they don't let any pressure through in the correct direction.
Hi PAXpress,

I use Clippard check valves and have for years. My CO2 check valves are 8+ years old and I have not had a failure; even when I have let me CO2 cylinders go empty and water has back-flowed as far at the check valve (but never further!) They are more expensive than the plastic check valves but much more rugged and in my opinion reliable. They have a very low 'cracking pressure' of 0.5 psig so it doesn't take a lot of pressure for it to allow gas to flow. My logic was pay a little more for a check valve and not have to replace an expensive regulator.

You will need the body of the check valve #MCV-1BB and two (2) 10/32 tubing fittings; I use the single barb ones for the more rigid CO2 tubing and the multi-barb for standard airline. Total cost is about $16 plus shipping for a high quality check valve; not exorbitant considering the possible damage to a regulator and/or water damage to floors, carpets, etc.

Clippard MCV-1BB with two multi-barb fittings installed
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi PAXpress,

I use Clippard check valves and have for years. My CO2 check valves are 8+ years old and I have not had a failure; even when I have let me CO2 cylinders go empty and water has back-flowed as far at the check valve (but never further!) They are more expensive than the plastic check valves but much more rugged and in my opinion reliable. They have a very low 'cracking pressure' of 0.5 psig so it doesn't take a lot of pressure for it to allow gas to flow. My logic was pay a little more for a check valve and not have to replace an expensive regulator.

You will need the body of the check valve #MCV-1BB and two (2) 10/32 tubing fittings; I use the single barb ones for the more rigid CO2 tubing and the multi-barb for standard airline. Total cost is about $16 plus shipping for a high quality check valve; not exorbitant considering the possible damage to a regulator and/or water damage to floors, carpets, etc.

Clippard MCV-1BB with two multi-barb fittings installed
This is EXACTLY what I'm looking for. And no the price doesn't scare me away I've already spent 20$ replacing the brass ones as they gum up and quit working which was about to be another 10 so 6 more for a bit more life is fine by me. Thanks for the links very helpful.
 

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This is EXACTLY what I'm looking for. And no the price doesn't scare me away I've already spent 20$ replacing the brass ones as they gum up and quit working which was about to be another 10 so 6 more for a bit more life is fine by me. Thanks for the links very helpful.
Hi PAXpress,

You say that they 'gum up'? Are you doing DIY CO2?

I'm trying to figure out where the 'gumming' is coming from unless it is the plastic reacting with moisture and CO2 which creates carbonic acid - which some plastics to not react well to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nope GLA gro 1 regulator on a 20# co2 tank. Think the problem came from me turning off the co2 for a month when my wife got fish used my tank as a temporary home for them and didn't want to worry about gassing them. Think water got into the brass check valve. Didn't use a plastic one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If I'm still unable to get more than 1 bubble per second or so is it safe to assume the problem lies within the diffuser? What other things can I check?
 

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Hi PAXpress,

Try disconnecting the diffuser and just put the CO2 line in the water.....still 1 bubble per second?
 
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