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Discussion Starter #1
I've been searching for threads related to my question, but I'm not finding a good answer.

Here's my issue:

I have pressurized co2 and I'm temporarily using a limewood airstone until my diffuser arrives. I have my filter output in the back-left corner of my tank, co2output in the front-left (very low in the tank) and filter intake is back-right of the tank. Can't really change this due to tank layout.

Right now I have to point the filter output directly at the airstone to get bubbles into the water flow and spread just halfway across the tank. This also blows the sand I have in the front left area into swirls and sand dunes that quickly covers my newly planted HC (sand is decorative and seperated from the substrate).

If I adjust the filter filter output higher, of course, the sand dunes take longer to build up, but if I adjust it enough that the sand isn't stirred up at all, the co2 bubbles stream straight to the top. I would much rather have my filter output angled away from the corner a bit so it doesn't create such a torrent, but that would exclude the co2 from ever getting into the flow, and just rising straight to the top

All the reading I have done tells me that co2 will disolve some even if it goes straight to the top, just not efficiently.

If I crank the co2 output 2-3 times what it is now with the bubbles going straight up, could I reach the same (or close to) amount of saturation as if the bubbles actually stuck around in the flow for a bit? By the way, the bubbles are pretty darn small coming from the limewood diffuser.

I'm hesitant to do anything else since my diffuser hasn't arrived, and I have no idea what the difference will be with a good diffuser. I know I could build/buy a reactor, but I want to exhaust the diffuser option first.

:eek:
 

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You can try putting the limewood diffuser at the bottom of the tank under your filter output. As the little bubbles rise the current from the output will blow them all over the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thats the way it is now, and was originally planed. My filter is an eheim ecco, and it has that goofy output pipe. I think I'm going to need a picture to illustrate.
 

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Hmmm, dare I suggest putting the diffuser directly underneath the eheim INTAKE, and use the canister for a reactor? I've done it with my filstar and it works just fine! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thats a really cool idea! I'm all over it unless there are some significant cons to the idea. But if it worked great for you!
 

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I do the best of both worlds, while
no bubble ever survives to the surface,
and they get blown all over my tank
without breaking the surface tension.
in this picture you will vertically see my;
filter outlet - lower than usual
filter inlet - higher than usual
(LED spot lite)
Hydor ario 2 - impeller diffuser
with a nice Anubias to cover it up!

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Don't forget we're also talking a 10 gallon tank, and real estate is very limited - especially the way I have setup the hardscape (I guess I'd call it that).

Also, for you spynet: My limewood diffuser send out some really, really tiny bubbles and I've watched some of the tiny ones. They float around in the current, but they never change size, let alone disappear. None of the bubbles change size for that matter. But I'd expect some of the small ones that do hang around in the current to do something. I can't imagine not a single bubble making it to the surface. Can you see bubbles to begin with?
 

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I would not recommend this. The fixing bacteria in the filter need O2 to convert the nitrogenous and phosphoric wastes into nitrate and phosphate. Adding CO2, a product they make in the process, and depriving them of O2, what they need, is bad. I would recommend that if any gas is to be added near to an intake, it be an airstone only. Don't ask how I know about the CO2 part.
 

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Blackfly,

Your thoughts are rational, yet wrong. First, bubbling air/O2 into a canister intake will likely result in airlock since air/O2 does not dissolve quickly enough to keep up with the amount taken in by the intake. 2nd, adding CO2 to the intake will not deprive "N-bacteria" of oxygen. True, you may be able to create problems if the CO2 concentration got very high (100's ppm), but the modest amount in our tanks (10-70ppm) is not enough to create any problems. Additionally, CO2 concentration will not be much higher in the canister than it is in the tank. The flush rate is simply too fast.

I'd give the "intake" idea a try. If you experience airlock (the only forseeable problem), you'll have to build a reactor. As long as you don't have really high lighting on the tank, creating a ton of O2, the canister shouldn't airlock. I won't get into the reasons for this on this thread.
 

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don't stick it under the intake. you're going to get a build up of gas in the canister and will most likely over heat the impellar and burn it up. baddddddd idea. the limestone diffuser under your outflow would be the best bet until you get a reactor built. you can build one of the rex reactors using pvc for fairly cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the suggestions! I got my limewood airstone and filter output adjusted well enough to stop the sand dunes for now, or at least until I get my diffuser. I still want to try the diffuser before I try a reactor. I love the discussion for sure; I learn alot from this board!
 

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Blackfly,

Your thoughts are rational, yet wrong. First, bubbling air/O2 into a canister intake will likely result in airlock since air/O2 does not dissolve quickly enough to keep up with the amount taken in by the intake. 2nd, adding CO2 to the intake will not deprive "N-bacteria" of oxygen. True, you may be able to create problems if the CO2 concentration got very high (100's ppm), but the modest amount in our tanks (10-70ppm) is not enough to create any problems. Additionally, CO2 concentration will not be much higher in the canister than it is in the tank. The flush rate is simply too fast.

I'd give the "intake" idea a try. If you experience airlock (the only forseeable problem), you'll have to build a reactor. As long as you don't have really high lighting on the tank, creating a ton of O2, the canister shouldn't airlock. I won't get into the reasons for this on this thread.
I fully agree and also endorse the advice.
 

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A small water pump solves your problem of dispersing co2 micro bubbles .
You need to install it right above the diffuser/limestone to redirect the bubbles to all over the tank.
 
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