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You've got a lot going on.

At dKH 10 I would expect your degassed pH to be 7.8 to 8.00. If so, your pH with CO2 injection at 7.2 is not optimized. My guess is it should be more like 6.4 to 6.6. How are you measuring pH? Calibrated probe? With a high tech tank getting CO2 right is key and likely the root cause of most of your problems. It takes time and effort to get it right and it's well worth the time.

And I agree with above comments that your light is likely too high. Once you get over 100 PAR you better have EVERYTHING dialed or you can expect to have issues.

Please don't listen to the comments above suggesting too much fertilizer is causing algae. That whole analysis about ferts and algae sucking up nutrients in a consistent ratio is nonsense. I have seen too low of nutrients cause more algae than too many. And the suggestion to dose a bit of this one week then a bit of something the next week is also bad advice. Plants like stability and consistency. You want to learn how to dose to keep levels in the tank as stable as possible.

You're dosing is not EI...which is good. Very few tanks need full EI levels. NO3 is about 15 per week and PO4 about 4.5. Honestly pretty decent and similar to many successful planted tankers out there. But it's hard to say for sure without seeing a full tank shot and the plant mix. Not sure on the micros as I am not familiar with what you are using.

If your NO3 really is 80 ppm, then you have problems. But it's likely not dosing. More likely is fish feeding and poor maintenance. Frozen foods are terrible for planted tanks. Adds loads of NO3 and other dissolved organics. I would do several back to back water changes and reset the tank. Then again if you are using the API test kit then I would not trust that reading without testing it against a calibrated sample.

All in all I would reset tank with water changes, vacuum the gravel, clean the filters, remove any dead or decaying plant matter, turn down (raise?) the light, keep dosing ferts, and most importantly get CO2 dialed in properly. If you need help with that reach out and I would be glad to help.

Don't give up. You can achieve balance. There are many successful planted tanks out there. If I were you I would seek out folks who demonstrate success that you can see and study their methods. And be careful listening to advice from folks who's tanks you haven't seen. There is loads of bad advice out there.

In the end a successful planted tank is a balance of light, CO2, fertilization, and even more importantly maintenance. And all of that needs to be in relation to the mix of plants you are attempting to grow. Sound complicated? It is, but you can do it if you take the time to learn.

After getting CO2 dialed in, next I would work on thinking of ferts in terms of ppm dosed per week. It's the universal language of the planted tank and knowing what you are dosing will help others help you.

Good luck and I look forward to seeing where the tank goes from here.
 

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ive got a 250ltr 60cm deep tank that I’ll put the asta on to. I’ve altered the lighting so I’ll do a big water change and see how it goes. Just added some rotala h’ra so am looking to see how that grows.
Lowering the lighting should help. Keep an eye on things and have patience. It takes plants time to adjust to new parameters.

Optimizing CO2 is a long discussion. It all has to do with pH drop from a fully degassed sample.

To get a fully degassed sample, leave a glass of water out for about three days (or one day with a bubbler in it). Start measuring the pH about every six hours or so until it stabilizes and comes to equilibrium with the atmosphere. To really do it right you want a calibrated pH probe. Test strips or liquid tests are an estimate at best.

The higher the light, the more demand for CO2. You will often hear about a magical 1.0 pH drop. In reality most of the best tanks you will see are more like 1.2 to 1.4. That means a pure yellow drop checker. Getting this right will make everything else easier.

You might also see a CO2/pH chart that is supposed to show the ppm of CO2 in the water. It doesn't. According to the chart my CO2 is 100+ ppm CO2. Is it really? Very unlikely. There are other forces at play with pH than just CO2.

As to fertilization, it's best to start thinking in terms of ppm of each fert. And you also need to understand how water changes and accumulation affect the actual amounts of ferts in the tank.

Good luck and it will be interesting to see what effect the new light will have.
 

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@Greggz i did a ph test an hour before co2 came on and an hour afte it was on just before the lights turned on and before it was 8.0 and after it was 7.0 so 1 point drop Done with api liquid test. Without a probe, would this be what I’m looking for. I know it is just a guide.
It's very likely good. But still hard to say for sure as API test can be off by quite a bit. What you see as 7.0 someone else may see as 7.2. And what you see as 8.0 someone else might see 7.8.

Keep in most tanks do not fully degas overnight. So you're true degassed pH is likely higher than you are measuring. So with a one point drop from just before CO2 comes on you should be OK.

What did the drop checker look like?? Should be pretty close to full yellow based on what you are reporting.
 

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No the drop checker was blue but we had to go out so I didn't see how long it took to turn green but we have come home 2hrs later and the checker is green and the pH is 6.6
If you really had a drop from 8.0 to 6.6 the drop checker would be screaming yellow. But a drop checker is a lagging indicator so it shows where the pH was a couple of hours ago.

Keep a close eye on it today. If it starts turning more lime green then you are on the right track.

And keep on eye on livestock. If they start going to the surface back off a bit.
 
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