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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I can't find any red clay to save my life, so I'm thinking either laterite or cat litter.

I know that through the firing process, there must be some chemical change. Would gray clay cat littler, all natural made from earth clay, have any large benefit to plants, or would I cloud my water temporarily for nothing?

No one here has any damn dark beneficial gravels or red clay.
 

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Don't use either one. Instead, find a water course, a creek, river, lake, etc. that has lots of built up silt banks around it. Dig some of that, down close to the water line. Use that under an inert substrate like Flourite. It is best to soak the silt in a few changes of water, with one of those changes being hot enough water to kill undesirable critters in the silt. Then let it dry out in the sun, before using it. I use river silt under SMS for my substrate and it has worked great. I also briefly used some under Flourite Black sand, where it seemed to be effective too.
 

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I think most gray cat litters use newspaper as filler mixed in with the clay, that wouldn't seem like a good substrate to me.
 

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It is best to mix the silt 50-50 with some of the rest of the substrate, for that lower level. Then add the other substrate on top.
 

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By silt, I mean a gritty clay-like soil, made up of very fine sand, clay and some organic materials. The reason for mixing it with some of the upper layer of substrate is first to avoid an abrupt change in substrate, and second to avoid a dense section of substrate that might become anaerobic. In any case I did that with mine, and it has worked even better than I had hoped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
By silt, I mean a gritty clay-like soil, made up of very fine sand, clay and some organic materials. The reason for mixing it with some of the upper layer of substrate is first to avoid an abrupt change in substrate, and second to avoid a dense section of substrate that might become anaerobic. In any case I did that with mine, and it has worked even better than I had hoped.
That's what I thought. I know exactly where to get some, thank you :]
 
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