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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at the likely possibility that my 1 planted tank with co2 is going to expand into 3 tanks with co2 needs. All three of these will be in seperate parts of the house. I have heard of one person in the past (not sure if it was here on tpt or not) that had 'central co2'. I am debating if it will be cost efective. basically I will buy a single larger bottle like a 20# or so, along with 1 regulator and guage set, a manifold, and seperate co2 lines run through the house. Then each tank would have a needle valve and buble counter.

Running the stuff through the house would be no problem, I have run multiple coax and cat5 lines into just about every room of my house all homerun, most wallfished up into the attick then down through a cavity behind a closet into my utility room.

What I am not sure of is how much it will cost for whatever I use for the co2 line. There was a chart out there of the co2 permeability of various plastics, I cant seem to find it right now. Any thoughts?
 

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Pretty easy to do with the right equipment. About 1/3 of the regulators I build are built to feed more than one tank.

I sell good CO2 tubing for $0.70 a foot. If you need a lot that price can be negotiated, if purchased with a regulator and all the other parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So then regular (soft) tubing is ok when plumbed infront of the needle valve? I know the pressure is a bit higher, but still pretty low. I was originally thinking polyethelyne tubing from lowes, but even that isnt 100% co2 proof and at higher pressures and over longer distances might add up. I cant remember how much a foot it is off hand, yours might be doable, I'll have to figure out what kind of lengths I would need.
 

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Food for thought, with such long pieces of tubing it would be wise to turn on the C02, let's say a half an hour before the lights click on to flush out the oxygen in tubing. Unless of course there is remaining C02 in the tubing after each light/C02 session.
 

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This sounds interesting but wouldn't soft tubing be able to bend and get cut and etc ? is there any type of hard tubing that can be used wth co2 ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The tubing I mentioned (polyethelyne) is somewhat rigid (for example). BTW your phone wiring is soft too, and yes its very easy to burn through the insulation when pulling it through a wall, but people still put phone line in thier house.
 

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This is a great idea. Could you do the same thing with 1 planted tank and 1 reef tank with the calcium reactor?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I know little about SW tanks. My thought was just to save money by only using 1 co2 tank and regulator. And since I am pretty good at wallfishing, and have easy access to the walls via the attick, should be no problem.
 

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Dufus,

You sure could.

And I don't think you are going to harm the polyurethane tubing that I have pulling it though the walls. That stuff is tough.
 

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How would O2 get into the tubing? If there are no leaks then the CO2 remains in the tubing.
Unless of course there is remaining C02 in the tubing after each light/C02 session.

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
And I don't think you are going to harm the polyurethane tubing that I have pulling it though the walls. That stuff is tough.
Ahh is it polyurethane tubbing that you have? Just curious, as you didnt mention before. I;d amagine its pretty tough and more durable that the thin soft coating on modern phone wire lol.
 

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I can attest to that. It's pretty tough to cut even with a knife. It's good stuff and well worth the extra $.
 

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With these manifolds, if you adjust one needle valve on one tank, will the bubble rates on the other 2 tanks change as a result of the change in pressure? If so, that would be annoying, having to run around the house to check the bubble rates of all three tanks.

Having the bubble counters at the source not the tank would be the simplest.
 

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I've recently put in central co2. I think I posted some pictures a couple of weeks ago. I'll check. Didn't cost much at all and it's working great. I have a bubble counter at each tank going in each reactor. Haven't had any problems with changing bubble rates. I'm using D.O.T. tubing and it's holding up well. Very tough stuff. For each wall plate, I'm just using the stainless steel Coax plates with a bulkhead adapter used on airlines. Makes for a sturdy connection. I'll draw up a diagram of how it's wired in with some pictures.
 

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As long as you have a decent low side working pressure you will not have problems with one needle valve affecting the others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
With these manifolds, if you adjust one needle valve on one tank, will the bubble rates on the other 2 tanks change as a result of the change in pressure? If so, that would be annoying, having to run around the house to check the bubble rates of all three tanks.
You would want to run seperate needle valves (and buble counters) for each tank. Way to much possibility of problems trying to have them perfectly matched I would think. And to say what Rex was saying in a different way, as long as the amount of flow your adjusting with each individual valve is significantly smaller than the total available, then the effect on the others should be very small.
 
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