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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a batch of Red Cherry Shrimp sitting in a quarantine tank at the moment and I'm curious as to the best method of catching them to transfer them to the main aquarium.

I've thought about netting and trying to scoop in a cup, but that seems kind of stupid given their small size and quick leaps.

Would an algae wafer in a cup work?

What does everyone else use when they transfer small inverts?
 

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Make a trap out of a plastic soda bottle. Cut the bottle all the way around maybe a quarter of the way down, then invert the top and shove it down into the cylinder of the bottle. Put some algae wafers (or whatever you're feeding) in the bottom and let it sit in the tank overnight.

Like this, but without the cap...
Photo credit to planetinverts.com

By morning it will be full of shrimp.

I've had luck catching stragglers by lowering a net into the water and chasing individual shrimp into it with a stick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok, so you cut the top off where it makes a cone shape and then place it into the bottom section?

So the only way the shrimp can get to the food is by going through the cap spot?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Tried it last night and didn't catch any. Seemed to me that the lip of the bottle was too high for them to get into, or they couldnt sense the food in the water.

When I fed them today they went to the food like they should, so what should I do now?

Whole bottle is about 3 inches tall.
 

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I would just get 2 nets. Leave one on one side of the tank and use the other to herd them around. This would probably work best if one net is bigger than the other

Haha sorry for the delayed reply. Hope you were able to catch all your shrimp.
 

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Make a trap out of a plastic soda bottle. Cut the bottle all the way around maybe a quarter of the way down, then invert the top and shove it down into the cylinder of the bottle. Put some algae wafers (or whatever you're feeding) in the bottom and let it sit in the tank overnight.

Like this, but without the cap...
Photo credit to planetinverts.com

By morning it will be full of shrimp.

I've had luck catching stragglers by lowering a net into the water and chasing individual shrimp into it with a stick.
These work really well, folks interested in breeding an culling out the lesser grades, should have one of these in their tank maybe once a week or two to sort through the shrimp, do not feed for 1-2 days, then do this.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

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When I moved my whole colony of 90 shrimp to a new tank, I just used a small sized net and individually caught them. It wasn't nearly time consuming as I thought it would be, it actually only took about 20 minutes. You don't have to make some intricate trap that you wait overnight to work, just stick the net in and scoop them out :D.
 

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These work really well, folks interested in breeding an culling out the lesser grades, should have one of these in their tank maybe once a week or two to sort through the shrimp, do not feed for 1-2 days, then do this.

Regards,
Tom Barr
I just started keeping these guys and want to keep an active role in their genetic health and coloration. At what age/length at and with respect to what criteria do you cull with? What are the specifics that you are looking for when culling?
 

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You cull the ones that are pale.
When they are old enough they could or should be bright

This doesn't help genetic health however. But also no one has been able to show any effects of imbreeding even for many many generations.

You might want to add some new shrimp in a couple years to be on the safe side though
 

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You don't have to make some intricate trap that you wait overnight to work, just stick the net in and scoop them out :D.
that trap does does not look very intricate to me LOL. but you could allways put some shrimp food in the net, let the net sit in the watter and the shrimp should wander themselves rite into your net insted of you chasing them with a stick like a crazy person.
 

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You cull the ones that are pale.
When they are old enough they could or should be bright

This doesn't help genetic health however. But also no one has been able to show any effects of imbreeding even for many many generations.

You might want to add some new shrimp in a couple years to be on the safe side though
When you say old enough or should be bright, that doesn't really help. Can you be a bit more specific? Old enough -- days old/length? Should be bright -- specify? I'm sure many new members don't have experience with shrimp and would benefit from more specific information.

Also, I figure culling prototypical deformities (kinked arch) would help genetic health similar to how culling deformed fish would.

Thanks for your input. Can you reply with more specific advise?
 

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Cull ones that are near adult size and have less than average coloration for your tank.

I have never seen a shrimp with a deformity, it does not happen like is common with guppys ect. But if you seen one you should cull it.
 
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