The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 20 of 85 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can a Cast Iron pan in Aquarium for IRON trace elements fertilizers for plants?

Lets say you have an old cast iron pan that is rusted beyond repair, this could be placed in the oven during a cleaning cycle and any oils or impurities would probably be incinerated leaving you with Iron.

I guess one of the question is if this iron is in a form which can be used by plants and if such a thing may be feasible?

Thanks.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,032 Posts
Rust is not a bioavailable form of iron. I would be more worried about rust stains, at some point it is going to kill your fish and cloud your water, regardless how much the plants like it.
Natural iron levels in parts were say many tetras come form is maybe .5 to 1ppm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,261 Posts
Can a Cast Iron pan in Aquarium for IRON trace elements fertilizers for plants?

Lets say you have an old cast iron pan that is rusted beyond repair, this could be placed in the oven during a cleaning cycle and any oils or impurities would probably be incinerated leaving you with Iron.

Thanks.
I love your questions. I've read where rusty nails, etc., have been used for terrestrial plantings. I believe the iron would have to be touching the roots for it to be used. If you planted that pan with soil, and stuck it in the tank, I think it would work. I researched leaves for the nutrient purposes. But you'd need a load of leaves to break down in your tank to be of any value. It would be more like compost soup. And to the other poster here, ...I have diamonds on the soles of my feet...does that count?:wink2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
Ordinary iron oxide, rust, is not a form that dissolves in water, leaving iron ions available for plants to use. Bacteria can convert rust to a bioavailable form, as I recall, but trying to dose iron in the form of rusty iron isn't a good way to do it. One of the chemists here could explain this so we all could understand it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
Title thread made me laugh out loud...things people will try :))

Chelated, bioavailable iron is really not that expensive, easy to dose and convenient to use... It is not worth it to wait for iron oxide to be transformed back into bioavailable form. Maybe if you had a really large pond and wanted to see the results years after... it will also likely require anaerobic conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I find it hard to believe that the "iron fish" will put any significant amount of iron in human diets. And, for the same reasons that cast iron in an aquarium isn't a great idea.
Well, that Leafzone from API is really expensive and its probably 99% water. I was looking at a large quantity of another iron product in bulk and it was like $50 for container of Iron solution. If I can have a slow release of iron into the water from something I might normally throw in the garbage, then why not?

So you need a particular type of bacterial that can convert this type of iron into something "bioavailability ", well my question would be does this bacterial exist in an aquarium/underwater setting or only in ground dirt? Does it really take years until you get any iron bioavailability for plants or are you saying for the entire cast iron to dissolve.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Dude...wash the pan with soap, get your metal scrub and apply some force or use a drill and buy one of those metal brushes and buffer the crap out of the cast iron. Wash it again with soap.

Put it on the oven, remove it, apply some flaxseed oil or crisco...repeat the process and bring that baby back to life!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,032 Posts
You must have seen milky rusty water from having iron rust in it... The stuff looks and smells vile.
I wouldn't put that into my drain, much less an aquarium.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Dude...wash the pan with soap, get your metal scrub and apply some force or use a drill and buy one of those metal brushes and buffer the crap out of the cast iron. Wash it again with soap.

Put it on the oven, remove it, apply some flaxseed oil or crisco...repeat the process and bring that baby back to life!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Dude, its 2016 not 1776 . I have high tech nonstick ceramic infused with copper and Titanium made in Gotham steel industry Wayne industries that can melt cheese in the pan without sticking and withstand a artillery shell while having a car run over it. Why do I need to use the same type of frying pan that George Washington used while crossing the Delaware river??

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOnKXjjRZkE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You must have seen milky rusty water from having iron rust in it... The stuff looks and smells vile.
I wouldn't put that into my drain, much less an aquarium.
It can be cleaned with vinegar, steel brushes and placed in the oven on the clean cycle which gets hot enough to burn any oil or jump off the pan so you are left with only iron.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,032 Posts
Oh yeah, the pan looks saveable... That is the wonder of cast iron.
Still sour as my one cast iron pot broke its leg off right out of the pot, and now it has a hole... :(

PS we are just a few tiny cataclysms away from living like Washington again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
Dude, its 2016 not 1776 . I have high tech nonstick ceramic infused with copper and Titanium made in Gotham steel industry Wayne industries that can melt cheese in the pan without sticking and withstand a artillery shell while having a car run over it. Why do I need to use the same type of frying pan that George Washington used while crossing the Delaware river??
You need to keep using that cast iron pan because it is wasteful to discard it. For the same reason you need to save all of your used aluminum foil, until you have enough to justify melting it down and making DIY aluminum foil. Incidentally, I think George Washington used only teflon coated pans.
 
1 - 20 of 85 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top