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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a high tech 75 gallon and I'm looking for an easy carpeting plant and some nice floating plants that won't be too invasive. Any suggestions?

I have some grass hair that isn't doing well and pearl weed that is alive but not spreading at all. Any suggestions to help it grow or something else to plant?
 

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I have a high tech 75 gallon and I'm looking for an easy carpeting plant and some nice floating plants that won't be too invasive. Any suggestions?

I have some grass hair that isn't doing well and pearl weed that is alive but not spreading at all. Any suggestions to help it grow or something else to plant?
Hair grass is the easiest carpeting plant. If it's not growing well something is unbalanced in your system. What is your light and fertilizer regimen?

Red root floaters are nice but can be tricky. Salvinia and giant duck weed are two easier options for floaters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hair grass is the easiest carpeting plant. If it's not growing well something is unbalanced in your system. What is your light and fertilizer regimen?

Red root floaters are nice but can be tricky. Salvinia and giant duck weed are two easier options for floaters.
I'm still trying to balance it. CO2 is on 1.5 hours before light and both are on for 7 hours. Flourish and flourish trace alternating 3 x week each. Maybe I didn't break them up and spread them out enough? They have been in the tank for 2.5 weeks.
 

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Flourish and flourish trace are actually both trace ferts iirc. If you want to stick with seachem then add flourish Nitrogen, Phos and, Potassium. Also they have iron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Flourish and flourish trace are actually both trace ferts iirc. If you want to stick with seachem then add flourish Nitrogen, Phos and, Potassium. Also they have iron.
That's interesting. Thank you for clarifying that. So have I been burning my plants? Why would they sell two different products that are the same, what is the difference?
 

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Based on their product description Flourish is a
comprehensive plant supplement for the natural freshwater aquarium.
and Flourish Trace
supplies a broad range of trace elements demonstrated to be necessary for proper plant health and growth
Further reading on Trace indicates that it's for supplementing when using Flourish. Specifically,
If the growth rate is substantial the trace elements are often utilized more rapidly than the other components in Flourish®, thus in this case it would be beneficial to also employ Flourish Trace™ along with Flourish
.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Based on their product description Flourish is a and Flourish Trace

Further reading on Trace indicates that it's for supplementing when using Flourish. Specifically, .
I read that as well which is why I was confused when you said they are the same thing. I'm still confused by it but maybe I can email seachem and get a better explanation. So you think I should fertilize with the flourish phos potas iron... Do you prefer a different company? I was looking into aquarium coop all in one.
 

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Nah man, I know cause I use 'em too, ha. Most here will recommend an all-in-one but, the few of us who get into the hobby with seachem sometimes find it hard to get away. I have a ton from early stocking sprees so I continue to use what I have.

I also secretly love having a syringe for every bottle and a chart on the fridge but that's on me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nah man, I know cause I use 'em too, ha. Most here will recommend an all-in-one but, the few of us who get into the hobby with seachem sometimes find it hard to get away. I have a ton from early stocking sprees so I continue to use what I have.

I also secretly love having a syringe for every bottle and a chart on the fridge but that's on me.
Syringe and chart... Please explain. I like to be methodical but the bottle instructs to measure by the capful.

How often do you fertilize? How big is your tank? How heavily planted? CO2?
 

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To your question though, I've not tried any carpeting fertilized or otherwise.

I will second @minorhero in saying that Salvinia will be super easy even without ferts. Too easy. Mixing bowls full easy.

The cap is indicated as being 5ml on most of their bottles, 10ml on some of the bulk sizes.

So looking at Flourish Excel bottle in front of me 5ml per 10gal on initial dose. So I would math out what 5ml/10gal = with x/(gal in my tank) say 6.5 and x = the dose. 3.25ml.

Edit:

Link for the syringes I have been using. There's heaps of options though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The cap is indicated as being 5ml on most of their bottles, 10ml on some of the bulk sizes.

So looking at Flourish Excel bottle in front of me 5ml per 10gal on initial dose. So I would math out what 5ml/10gal = with x/(gal in my tank) say 6.5 and x = the dose. 3.25ml.
How important do you think it is to be so exact that you would use a syringe. I'm trying to figure out how much water is actually in my tank when taking hardscapes and substrate into consideration.

Is that salvinia super invasive? Do you know what is tricky about the red root floaters? I was considering that one.
 

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You will find that the many, many experienced members here will repeat one thing over and over and that is consistency.

If you are unsure of the actual #gals in your tank then I would use a semi conservative estimate accounting for substrate and hardscape, and use that going forward. You can fine tune this later but for growth and prevention of unwanted growth (algae), you'll need to be consistent.

For me that means precision with my dosing and the dosing schedule (and lighting and CO2 for that matter). Hence the chart. And based on what I've read here, I'm not even getting started with the carpet specific stuff. And also, you know... I get to play mad scientist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You will find that the many, many experienced members here will repeat one thing over and over and that is consistency.

If you are unsure of the actual #gals in your tank then I would use a semi conservative estimate accounting for substrate and hardscape, and use that going forward. You can fine tune this later but for growth and prevention of unwanted growth (algae), you'll need to be consistent.

For me that means precision with my dosing and the dosing schedule (and lighting and CO2 for that matter). Hence the chart. And based on what I've read here, I'm not even getting started with the carpet specific stuff. And also, you know... I get to play mad scientist.
Absolutely. It gets pretty overwhelming reading some posts around here. Thank you for the advice. I'm a little concerned about my lighting. I'm not sure how to measure PAR and I'm not sure if all my plants are getting the right amount. Or even how to control that if I could figure out what they needed.
 

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Absolutely. It gets pretty overwhelming reading some posts around here. Thank you for the advice. I'm a little concerned about my lighting. I'm not sure how to measure PAR and I'm not sure if all my plants are getting the right amount. Or even how to control that if I could figure out what they needed.
You can find out the PAR info for most commercial brand lights by googling. If you have a non-brand light, you’d have to use a PAR meter. Most carpet plants need around 50 PAR at the substrate, dwarf hair grass being one of them. IME Dwarf hairgrass isn’t the easiest carpeting plant—some easier options would be s repens, dwarf Sagittaria, and crypt parva.

Totally relate to being overwhelmed when you’re getting started, personal experience and persistence are key. I highly recommend https://www.2hraquarist.com/ for some pretty good basic beginner planted tank info. It doesn’t answer everything but it’s a great resource.

What light do you have?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You can find out the PAR info for most commercial brand lights by googling. If you have a non-brand light, you’d have to use a PAR meter. Most carpet plants need around 50 PAR at the substrate, dwarf hair grass being one of them. IME Dwarf hairgrass isn’t the easiest carpeting plant—some easier options would be s repens, dwarf Sagittaria, and crypt parva.

Totally relate to being overwhelmed when you’re getting started, personal experience and persistence are key. I highly recommend https://www.2hraquarist.com/ for some pretty good basic beginner planted tank info. It doesn’t answer everything but it’s a great resource.

What light do you have?
These are the specs. It's 95 at 12". My Substrate is roughly 18"
Slope Font Science Astronomical object Terrestrial plant

Gadget Audio equipment Office supplies Font Display device
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Par is beyond my current scope but now I'm curious. How does PAR in air convert to PAR in water? Or does it not need to?
I am in no way the guy to ask for a confident answer .. but from what I understand, it does not matter. What will play a part is vegetation(floating plants) and tannins in the water... I hope someone can correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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Par is beyond my current scope but now I'm curious. How does PAR in air convert to PAR in water? Or does it not need to?
PAR in water is reduced by several factors…

1. Reflection/refraction - this reflects some light back out of the tank, but it also focuses light reflected from the glass toward some areas of the tank. Bright single point light sources tend to cause hotspots near the corners. Longer bar-like light sources provide more even coverage and distribution.

2. Water clarity - if your water is cloudy or discolored in any way, some light will be absorbed.

3. Angle of the light - see reflection/refraction above. For example, if a single point light source is highly inclined, you will have less predictable hotspots.

4. Depth - various wavelengths of light are typically absorbed by water at different depths. This typically doesn’t matter unless you have a very deep tank and a light with a less than optimal spectrum or LED mixture. Blue light penetrates more readily than red for example.


It’s really all about having the right intensity of light at the correct wavelength for chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b. Just do a little research on this and then search google for a chlorophyll absorption spectrum diagram and the spectral diagram you posted above will make more sense. Your image contains a basic version of such a diagram.
 

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To be clear the problem with flourish is that it has very little nitrogen in it. Basically its designed for a tank with a lot of fish and not a lot of fast growing plants. The fish provide the nitrogen through their poop. For a tank without fish or a tank with fast growing plants (like carpeting plants) it means you are starving your tank of needed nutrients which is probably why your hair grass is not doing well.

There are a lot of good fertilizer options out there. Personally I don't want a tank that needs my input every day to survive so I use either all in one fertilizer I dose after weekly water changes or I use an auto doser. But other people really like dosing daily and find it helps them keep track of what is going on in their tanks so to each their own.

Anyway since the OP is in the USA I would recommend Nicolg Thrive as the all in one fertilizer. I've been using them for years now and its a really solid product.

To figure out how much light you are producing you can use a lux meter or the lux meter app for smart phone. Take the lux at the same distance from the light as your substrate is from the light. Then divide that number by 80 to get a rough approximation of par. For hair grass you want at least 25 par. Personally I like my light to be around 30-40 for a high tech tank simply because I find this to be enough light to grow anything but not too much that I have to stress about fertilizer being used up before next weeks water change.
 
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