The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just got my Hagen carbonate & general hardness test kit.

What does it all mean.

GH 80mg/L CaCo2

KH 150 mg/L

My PH is 8.2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
What it mean

GH 80mg/L CaCo2

KH 150 mg/L

My PH is 8.2


GH = Total hardness of water

This mean the total amount of (mineral,salts dissolve in you’re water)

Calcium and Magnesium are responsable for the majority (about 80%) of total hardness in natural freshwaters. Dissolved salts such as calcium hydrogen-carbonate (Ca(HCO3)2) and calcium sulfate (CaSO4) are generally the main cause of hardness in water. Larger concentrations of calcium and magnesium salts means harder water; poor amounts of Ca and Mg salts means soft water.

GH=
Ca= 56.2%
Mg= 24.7 %
Na (sodium)= 9.4 %
Others 9.7 %

80 mg/l of GH mean that you have that amount of salt in you’re water.

Generally a target for planted aqarium is 80 to 120 mg/l

You have relativly soft water and this is good...

KH 150 mg/L

KH mean alkalinity
The measure you get is the amount of carbonates in dissolution in you’re water. Carbonates act as a buffer and stabilize the ph of a water.

Alkalinity in the chemistry of natural waters is a measure of how much acid (H+) is required to lower the pH to a specific level. This will be"total alkalinity." frequently referred to as TA.

TA is defined as the amount of acid required to lower the pH of the sample to the point where all of the bicarbonate [HCO3-] and carbonate [CO3--] could be converted to carbonic acid [H2CO3]. This is called the carbonic acid equivalence point or the carbonic acid endpoint.

These equations show what happens to carbonate and bicarbonate as acid is added:

(1) Buffer zone ==> H+ (acid) + CO3 (carbonate) ** ==> * HCO3- (bicarbonate)
— here as you add acid it is buffer by carbonate... ph will be stable

as you add more acid...

(2) carbonic acid endpoint ==> H+ (acid) + HCO3- (bicarbonate)* ==>* H2CO3 carbonic acid
— Here, all the carbonate is transform in bicarbonate and finally in carbonic acid by continued acidification, ph will drop.

a KH of 150 mg/l explain you’re high PH 8.2

In planted aquarium a KH of 30 to 40 mgl is prefered. Here the water ph will be around 6.5, 6.8, ideal ph for the absorption of nutrient by plants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
I have just got my Hagen carbonate & general hardness test kit.

What does it all mean.

GH 80mg/L CaCo2

KH 150 mg/L

My PH is 8.2
It means you have had the pleasure of using three test kits.:biggrin: Now, you can put the test tube and reagents back in the box and leave them in the cabinet under the tank. The readings you got are acceptable. If you want to know how much CO2 you have in the water, get a drop checker, and set it up. The pH reagent is good for that, and the KH test kit can be used to set up the 4dKH solution in the drop checker.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,009 Posts
You have a GH of 8- thats hardness

KH of 15- Your waters ability to buffer the PH- Pretty high

CO2= about 3 ppm if thats what you want to know
No, this isn't exactly right. We normally use German degrees of hardness.

The directions from the Hagen kit say to multiply the mg/L (ppm) of the KH and GH CaCO3 by 0.056 to get degrees. This is in German degrees of hardness.

There Be Whales Here actually has:
GH - 80 mg/L x 0.056 = 4.48 German degrees of hardness

KH - 150 mg/L x 0.056 = 8.4 German degrees of hardness

_________________________________________________________________________

These are the conversions from the Hagen Kit:
Multiply GH or KH(mg/L CaCo3) by X 0.056 = dH° or/ou/o/gH°
Multiply GH or KH(mg/L CaCo3) par X 0.07 = Clark H°
Multiply GH or KH(mg/L CaCo3) por X 0.1 = fH°
Multiply GH or KH(mg/L CaCo3) por X 1 = hardness°
Multiply GH or KH(mg/L CaCo3) by X 0.02 = mEq/L

You can refer back to the following thread: http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/water-parameters/39462-hardness-alkalinity.html
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,014 Posts
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top