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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I have a 200 gallon that I do weekly 50% water changes on. I do this sort of automatically using a drip system and float valve. It runs for about 15 hours. I dump enough prime for about 75% of the tank volume (as suggested by a member on this forum) because some of it will be removed by the drip system over time. Afterwards, I dose another 25% tank volume of prime just to be safe.

So what I am planning to do is use my 4" x 20" water filter housing with carbon to prefilter the water coming out of my tap so that I wont have to use prime anymore. but my question is, is there a type of carbon that removes both chlorine and chloramines? If so, how often would this need to be replaced?

Anyone have experience with this?

Thanks
 

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Carbon filters remove chlorine, but only if the water flows very slowly through the filter. You are replacing 50% of a 200 gallon tank in 15 hours, or about .11 gallons per minute. The filter housing holds about a gallon, of which perhaps half of that is the filter, so it should have about half a gallon of water in it. At .11 gpm, it takes 5 minutes to replace the water in the filter housing - each "chunk" of water stays in contact with the carbon for about 5 minutes. There is a very good chance that most of the chlorine will be removed by the filter. The ammonia is another story - I don't think the filter will remove ammonia.

Now, if the water change system is a continuous flow system, with no draining of the tank water, the water flow rate has to be a lot higher than .11 gpm, and the filter may not remove the chlorine with the faster flow. There is a simple equation that gives you the flow rate needed to replace half of the original water, when you take 15 hours to do it, but I don't remember it right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Carbon filters remove chlorine, but only if the water flows very slowly through the filter. You are replacing 50% of a 200 gallon tank in 15 hours, or about .11 gallons per minute. The filter housing holds about a gallon, of which perhaps half of that is the filter, so it should have about half a gallon of water in it. At .11 gpm, it takes 5 minutes to replace the water in the filter housing - each "chunk" of water stays in contact with the carbon for about 5 minutes. There is a very good chance that most of the chlorine will be removed by the filter. The ammonia is another story - I don't think the filter will remove ammonia.

Now, if the water change system is a continuous flow system, with no draining of the tank water, the water flow rate has to be a lot higher than .11 gpm, and the filter may not remove the chlorine with the faster flow. There is a simple equation that gives you the flow rate needed to replace half of the original water, when you take 15 hours to do it, but I don't remember it right now.
Thanks for your input. You are right, the water level in the tank does not change much during the water change. It lowers slightly but not a very noticeable difference. If this method won't work, do you have any suggestions that will allow me to still use Prime but more efficiently? I am probably dumping in way more than what others usually use.
 

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I don't do automatic water changes, but I do use a dosing pump to dose ferts and excel.


The dosing pump allows you to control flow, and time of flow. Maybe you can use a dosing pump to start prime before the water change, and then a set amount of prime through out the water change?


Now as far as how much prime in the beginning and how much during the water change, I have no idea, but I know the dosing pump will work.


LionelC
 

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I cant comment on what filter you'll want to use. But perhaps switching from seachem prime to seachem safe makes sense for you. Safe is essentially the powdered version of prime. If all you're looking for is a way to handle chlorine and chloramine then Safe is a good choice. Its MUCH cheaper than prime and works just as well (may not remove heavy metals and there might be some other subtle differences between it and Prime; but definitely handles the chlorine and chloramines)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't do automatic water changes, but I do use a dosing pump to dose ferts and excel.


The dosing pump allows you to control flow, and time of flow. Maybe you can use a dosing pump to start prime before the water change, and then a set amount of prime through out the water change?


Now as far as how much prime in the beginning and how much during the water change, I have no idea, but I know the dosing pump will work.


LionelC
sounds like a good idea. thinking of switching to seachem safe instead so maybe an eheim auto fish feeder would be a better option for this.

I cant comment on what filter you'll want to use. But perhaps switching from seachem prime to seachem safe makes sense for you. Safe is essentially the powdered version of prime. If all you're looking for is a way to handle chlorine and chloramine then Safe is a good choice. Its MUCH cheaper than prime and works just as well (may not remove heavy metals and there might be some other subtle differences between it and Prime; but definitely handles the chlorine and chloramines)
Was thinking the same thing !
 
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