The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All -
I am putting together my new fancy goldfish tank. I have a 40 gallon breeder tank and intend to stock it with a copious amount of plants and two to three fancy goldfish. I found a used canister filter used for $55. It is Sunsun HW-303B canister filter with 9 volt uv light. I have told the gentleman I will pick it up from him this weekend. But after I made that commitment, I began to think that maybe a DIY sump filter might be a better option. So my questions are these:

Would a sump filter be better than a canister filter?

Would a 10 gallon aquarium turned into a sump filter be big enough for a 40 gallon aquarium?

If the answer above is "NO, you need a bigger aquarium.", please consider that I do plan to have also a HOB aquaponics planter above the tank. I want to add a little extra greenery to my apartment. :nerd: Winters are tough were I live and having a little jungle in my apartment will be so awesome! So would a 10 gallon aquarium be enough in this case?

Regardless of which filtering system I use (canister or sump), would you place the outtake of the filter into the aquaponics planter or back to the tank?

And lastly ... if you believe the canister is what I should go with, do you think the Sunsun HW-303B canister filter with 9 volt uv light is a good one for a 40 gallon aquarium?

I know the answers to my question are not easy ones and might take someone a bit of time to answer. So do know that I appreciate all advice on this matter.

Cheers,
Kayte
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,862 Posts
A 10 gallon sump would be enough for a 40 gallon tank. No set in stone rule to size as it depends on variables such as pump flow rate, sump filtration type, media, etc.).
But the extra water volume is nice to have more dilution and stocking potential, especially when dealing with goldfish.

Although the SunSun may hold about 3-4 gallon or so itself, so it's not that much less than the 10 gallon.

I actually haven't set up a sump yet. Not sure which is easier to maintain.
But I do like how you can hide heaters and all out of sight in the sump.
Canister filters (SunSun for sure) are very quite.

It's up to you really, especially with the cost factor. For larger sized tanks I would lean toward a sump. 55 gallon or 40 gallon, a canister is fine.

Although in regards to a SunSun, I would recommend the 304 or 404, and not the 303 which I think would be a bit underpowered. By the way, look on eBay and Amazon, I am sure you can get a brand new one shipped to your door for pretty much that price, maybe with media included. UV's on the SunSun's aren't that great, pretty much only useful for green water algae and maybe some free floating bacteria. It's up to you if it's better to get the UV (B model) or without (A model), which have the media baskets a bit bigger.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
450 Posts
Sump 100% if you can, 800x easier to maintain. I would drill the aquarium and not use a hob overflow. It will cost way more to do a sump but the benifits are so nice. Everytime i work on my tank i wish i drilled it and had a sump. Next aquarium for sure will have a sump
There is one issue with drilling that must be brought up, if the glass is tempered you cannot drill it and must use a HOB overflow. That is something to consider before moving forward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
There's also another couple of things to consider before you decide between the two: Noise and pump head.

There are always exceptions to the rule, but generally speaking sumps will make more "noise" than a canister set up. If the aquarium will be in the living room where you can adjust the TV volume to compensate for the extra "noise" it may not be an issue. If you plan on having it next to your bed, the added "noise" may not be to your liking.

Generally speaking about canisters, they are not designed to pump water substantially higher than the water level inside your aquarium. If you are really set on having the water pumped up higher than that, you will be able to do that by getting a pump for the sump that is rated for that much pumping height (head). I have been considering doing something similar to that when I get my 125 project started up here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Generally speaking about canisters, they are not designed to pump water substantially higher than the water level inside your aquarium. If you are really set on having the water pumped up higher than that, you will be able to do that by getting a pump for the sump that is rated for that much pumping height (head).
That's true. To be precise, canister filters are not designed to pump water higher than the water level inside your aquarium at all. A "traditional" canister setup implies either submerged output or some sort of spray bar no more than ~1 above the water surface. In this case the pump in the filter experiences approx. zero gravity head, i.e. it does not have to lift water anywhere.

Having said that, impeller pumps in canister filters do have some gravity head capacity (as any pump does), meaning that it is possible to raise the output higher above the tank water level. But keep in mind that every extra inch might result in noticeable flow reduction. That's how it always is with light-duty non-positive displacement pumps (impeller pumps).

In a sump setup the pump actually has to do all the work against gravity head, which is one of the reasons they have to be stronger an generally make more noise.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
450 Posts
Silicone pads and some flex tubing on the output will reduce a lot of that noise. On my sump you hear the drain into the sump more then you do the pump(silent unless you are in the stand). Even then its not bad at all, more relaxing then anything else.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top