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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I picked up this Fluval 307 and planned on running it on the counter parallel to the tank but the manual says it must "ALWAYS" be positioned below the tank. The inlet on the canister is REALLY close to the top of the tank for the gravity action, but the pickup tube opening will pull from lower in the tank. Should lighten the load on the pump though pushing horizontally rather than vertically? Will this work?


 

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All canister filters have a max distance from bottom of filter to tank rim, some have a minimum distance from top of filter to tank rim and some also include the water height in the tank in the instruction manual. Some instructions also state that the input and output hoses should be approx. the same length.

Having said that, the usual issue is priming the filter when it is empty or after maintenance because it is more difficult to evacuate the air properly when the filter isn't located below the aquarium. Some aquarists try what you are attempting and have no problems, others do.

Just curious why you want to install the filter that way?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
All canister filters have a max distance from bottom of filter to tank rim, some have a minimum distance from top of filter to tank rim and some also include the water height in the tank in the instruction manual. Some instructions also state that the input and output hoses should be approx. the same length.

Having said that, the usual issue is priming the filter when it is empty or after maintenance because it is more difficult to evacuate the air properly when the filter isn't located below the aquarium. Some aquarists try what you are attempting and have no problems, others do.

Just curious why you want to install the filter that way?
This unit has a priming pump handle on top so I think it will make that much easier. I guess I will have to go ahead and try it but I wish I knew before continuing the project because I would add a shelf to the stand before I paint it. The reason for running the filter this way is for cosmetics it looks much cleaner if I can just put a white box over the filter on the counter that blends into the wall, rather than under the tank where its nice and open. I am painting the stand white to blend into the wall and that will give the tank a clean appearance sort of like "floating furniture" but if I need to run it under the tank I would want it on a shelf and not the floor so that my robotic vacuum can clean under the tank easier which is also why I removed the lower front support brace (I am sure it will be fine without it, I may drill some holes and install it halfway up the back)
 

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This configuration with the canister on the counter will work fine. A canister is a closed system so it doesn't really matter how high it is with relation to the tank. The canister will be easier to prime if it is below the water level in the tank, which it would be in your case. Once the canister is primed and running it doesn't make a lot of difference how high the canister is with relation to the tank.

I picked up this Fluval 307 and planned on running it on the counter parallel to the tank but the manual says it must "ALWAYS" be positioned below the tank. The inlet on the canister is REALLY close to the top of the tank for the gravity action, but the pickup tube opening will pull from lower in the tank. Should lighten the load on the pump though pushing horizontally rather than vertically? Will this work?


 

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I have run 2 tanks with the canister filter next to the tank. In my current shallow kitchen tank the top of the canister filter is actually higher then the rim of the tank. It makes no difference, as @Oughtsix mentioned the canister filter is a closed system. Height doesn't matter once its started.

BUT its a real PITA to prime when I go to clean the canister. I always move the canister filter to below the tank the tank when I need to prime it and then move it back to its usual place once I get it running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have run 2 tanks with the canister filter next to the tank. In my current shallow kitchen tank the top of the canister filter is actually higher then the rim of the tank. It makes no difference, as @Oughtsix mentioned the canister filter is a closed system. Height doesn't matter once its started.

Good to know! I was not sure if it was the actual top water level or the level of where the pickup tube pulls from lower in the tank that was the factor but as you said its a closed system so once primed its good to go. Thanks

BUT its a real PITA to prime when I go to clean the canister. I always move the canister filter to below the tank the tank when I need to prime it and then move it back to its usual place once I get it running.
Do you have a priming lever on yours? These new Fluvas have the primer on top, along with the special no leak valve so if I understand correctly the lines to and from the tank actually stay primed during a canister service so you only need to fill the canister.
 

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Do you have a priming lever on yours? These new Fluvas have the primer on top, along with the special no leak valve so if I understand correctly the lines to and from the tank actually stay primed during a canister service so you only need to fill the canister.
The biggest problem with "priming" your canister filter after a water change is, well, air floats up. Any air bubble in your system will want to float to the highest point possible.
If the out flow of your system is higher than the impeller in the canister filter - and your hoses don't drop below the impeller, than the air bubble will move away from the impeller.
If the out flow of your system is LOWER than the impeller in the canister filter, or your hoses dip below the level of the impeller, then it will be very difficult to prime the system as the impeller will not pump air.
 

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Do you have a priming lever on yours? These new Fluvas have the primer on top, along with the special no leak valve so if I understand correctly the lines to and from the tank actually stay primed during a canister service so you only need to fill the canister.
No 'lever' one filter had a push to prime bellows/button. Both were annoying to prime because even if you fill the water all the way up and your hoses were filled as well, the bit of air left over in the canister would still get in the way. BUT, I mean it takes 30 or so minutes to prime and then you are done for like 6 months till you need to clean your canister filter again, so it's not a big deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The biggest problem with "priming" your canister filter after a water change is, well, air floats up. Any air bubble in your system will want to float to the highest point possible.
If the out flow of your system is higher than the impeller in the canister filter - and your hoses don't drop below the impeller, than the air bubble will move away from the impeller.
If the out flow of your system is LOWER than the impeller in the canister filter, or your hoses dip below the level of the impeller, then it will be very difficult to prime the system as the impeller will not pump air.
Good point. I should be good than because the hose will actually run higher than the outflow exiting the canister before dropped down a bit to the outflow nozzle.

No 'lever' one filter had a push to prime bellows/button. Both were annoying to prime because even if you fill the water all the way up and your hoses were filled as well, the bit of air left over in the canister would still get in the way. BUT, I mean it takes 30 or so minutes to prime and then you are done for like 6 months till you need to clean your canister filter again, so it's not a big deal.
Yeah I remember the old canisters doing that from 15-20 years ago, I think the lever action has a longer stroke than the push style though. I am hoping this no mess valve helps too.
 

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Why not just fill your tank with water and try it out? Since your tank is empty this is a perfect time.

Besides you will want to do a leak test and pump trial run anyway! :cool:

If you find priming it to be a PITA you can go to Ikea and get a small white narrow cabinet to put beneath the counter and next to the tank.
 

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In that configuration with the canister on the filter next to the tank if you have any problem priming the filter just do it the old fashioned way. Put a 5g bucket on the floor, remove the return line from the tank, suck, put the return line into the bucket on the floor for a couple minutes. Once you have a good flow put your thumb over the return line outlet then transfer it back into the tank. I have had to do this with my Fluval canister filters even when they were on the ground. Other filters seem to have better priming systems than the Fluval 405 that I used to have.

There is a good chance that you won't have to do this. Filling the canister to mostly full in the sink before putting the top on will usually make it easier to prime.
 

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The suggestion to have it below has to do with priming the canister. By having the canister filter close to the rim (or even above), the filter may not be able to restart properly in the event of a power failure. This could lead to no circulation to the tank (until discovery) or the motor running dry (unable to cool itself) and possibly burning out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Why not just fill your tank with water and try it out? Since your tank is empty this is a perfect time.

Besides you will want to do a leak test and pump trial run anyway! :cool:

If you find priming it to be a PITA you can go to Ikea and get a small white narrow cabinet to put beneath the counter and next to the tank.
Good point, I really should leak test the tank anyway. Like I said though I would rather build a shelf to keep the canister off the floor if under the tank.

In that configuration with the canister on the filter next to the tank if you have any problem priming the filter just do it the old fashioned way. Put a 5g bucket on the floor, remove the return line from the tank, suck, put the return line into the bucket on the floor for a couple minutes. Once you have a good flow put your thumb over the return line outlet then transfer it back into the tank. I have had to do this with my Fluval canister filters even when they were on the ground. Other filters seem to have better priming systems than the Fluval 405 that I used to have.

There is a good chance that you won't have to do this. Filling the canister to mostly full in the sink before putting the top on will usually make it easier to prime.
As I mentioned above the lines always stay primed when servicing the canister because of Fluvals new Aquastop valve. The new 407/307 have better priming systems than the 405/305.

The suggestion to have it below has to do with priming the canister. By having the canister filter close to the rim (or even above), the filter may not be able to restart properly in the event of a power failure. This could lead to no circulation to the tank (until discovery) or the motor running dry (unable to cool itself) and possibly burning out.
Good to know, I have zero concerns than lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Are you sure that stand is sufficient for that tank It’s no bracing?
Yes, the vertical load baring aspects are still in tact. Its a stand designed and sold for use with a 55 gallon tank, the only modification that has been made was removing one lower horizontal support. That does nothing more than keep the frame square and true (which its far off from due to poor manufacturing). The rear lower support is still keeping the vertical frames from spreading, it does not wobble or walk on me and due to the poor nature of manufacturing, a piece of wood was necessary between the frame and bottom of the tank to keep the surface flush so there would be no stress on the tank from flexing across the uneven frame top.

I took it a step further just to be 100% confident in long term stability and built supports for the bottom of the tank by stacking two pieces of wood creating 3/8" spacers. This left 1/16" between the spacers and bottom of the glass to flex down and seat, supporting the hardscape stone. I realize there is a center brace on the bottom but I don't trust the open areas on either side. This won't cause any issues anyone can think of will it??


 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
At one point I had left an LED spotlight sitting on the top cross brace which was just warm enough to bend the brace downward. I am trying to fix it using a heat gun, cooling cycles and some zipties with a piece of wood. Is there a better way? Does anyone make an aftermarket metal brace insert?



 
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