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Hi, I am looking to set up a 75gal soon, and am considering what filter to get. I have run across several posts on this and other sites where people tell about canister filters that leaked and siphoned all the aquarium water out onto the floor. Obviously this would be a disaster worth avoiding. My question is: are all canister filters susceptible to this? Or only certain kinds? What, if anything, can be done to make sure that doesn't happen? Is the risk of this great enough that someone should use a HOB instead? Thanks for any advice!
 

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Fresh Fish Freak
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Equipment malfunction is always a risk no matter what... but IMO stick with a reputable canister such as Rena or Eheim and you minimize those risks.

HOBs are great filters too, but not quite as popular on planted tanks as if CO2 is being injected into a tank they can outgas the CO2.

Personally, I'd put 2 canisters on your tank; any combo of Rena XP2, XP3, or Eheim 2215 or 2217s.
 

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As with any equipment, failures "can" occur. Every morning when I get up I check for leaks of any sort. If I detect any water at all outside the tank, I find it's source. I also make sure all hose fittings are tight and have not moved.

+1 for Eheim. Extremely well built and an excellent hose connection system.
 

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Any filter design worth its salt is constructed to minimize leakage. When setup per manufacturors instructions leakage will not be a problem. That said get a reputible filter i.e. Eheim,Rena,Fluval etc and set it up properly then sit back and enjoy.
 

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I don't check for leaks "every day"

I figure I would notice if the water level started dropping a few inches though.

My canister was leaking recently. It doesn't have to be a torrent of water to be annoying, just a few dribbles. When people talk about leaking, I don't think they are generally talking about 50 gallons of water dumped out overnight.
 

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Well... I did have my Rena XP4 shoot water all over me once when I didn't have the top seated properly. Less than a gallon of water, probably, but it certainly got me wet! ROFL That was user error not a filter failure, though.

Really the only leak problem I've ever had with a canister filter was a failed O-ring on an Eheim quick-disconnect. It was a slow dribble and easily enough fixed.
 

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^^^^ every one wants the big name brands but i would check out a Sun Sun their alot more economical and they are the Chinese manufacturer to several of those big name canisters.

there nearly identical to the marineland C series.

only problem i had was a failed o-ring on the quick disconnect like lauraleellbp which was a easily repairable dribble. most likely this was caused on me being over zealous on my cleaning.

i always keep my canisters in half a five gallon bucket just as an incase measure for slow dribbles from damaged/misseated o-rings.
 

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I "worry" so much that I'm getting ready to install a second canister with "more" connections and fittings. :sleep:

But this brings up a thought. The intake tube of the Eheim (when installed the usual way) is about 6" from bottom of tank (it's a U tube). "If" a failure would occur, I'd wind up dumping 60 gallons of water onto a 2nd story room.

What would be wrong with reversing this tube and putting the short end into the tank, thus having the intake 6" from the top? This way, only 20 gal would be lost (still a lot, but no way close to emptying the tank).
 

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^^^^ every one wants the big name brands but i would check out a Sun Sun their alot more economical and they are the Chinese manufacturer to several of those big name canisters.

there nearly identical to the marineland C series.

only problem i had was a failed o-ring on the quick disconnect like lauraleellbp which was a easily repairable dribble. most likely this was caused on me being over zealous on my cleaning.

i always keep my canisters in half a five gallon bucket just as an incase measure for slow dribbles from damaged/misseated o-rings.
A bucket tray is on my list. It's hard to tell you even have a leak if it is subtle and you don't have carpet.
 

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What would be wrong with reversing this tube and putting the short end into the tank, thus having the intake 6" from the top? This way, only 20 gal would be lost (still a lot, but no way close to emptying the tank).
I don't really see any harm in reversing the tube so that the short end is inside the tank while the long end is outside the tank.

most disasters related to canisters are caused by user error!
+1. The only time my canister filters have leaked is if I haven't made sure to attach the tubing to the quick disconnects.
 

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most disasters related to canisters are caused by user error!
This is true but important. I was having issues that I couldn't figure out with my Ehiem. It had a broken impeller shaft new and being my first canister filter, I started messing with it while on. I ended up draining about 10 gallons on my floor. My fault but I didn't know better. I won't do what I did again but it was a big deal. I would take user error into account as I consider myself a pretty average person.

I don't see any negatives of a HOB filter unless you are trying to do DIY co2. That isn't very feasable on your size tank. If you have no co2, you don't really have much to loose. If you are doing pressurised, I said in other threads, I used about 2x as much co2 as with a canister. The cost of filling tanks is pretty minimal. It may end up costing you more than a canister in the long run but it still would take awhile.

HOB filters are safer for a total disaster, it just won't really happen. They are easier to maintain but need more frequent media changes and have far less media in general. Many brands have problems with the impeller restarting every once in awhile after turning them off. Not all though. Lastly, I found myself having alot of small spills with my HOB. It can be hard to take one out without spilling on something. It can be hard to replace media without some drips. Even though I had a significant spill with my canister (again, my fault), I would imagine all the small spills could add up over time.
 

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If you have a leak at the canister, reversing the tubing won't make a difference. Once the intake goes dry water will siphon back the outflow of the pump. It would be working against the impeller, but depending on where the leak is, its not fool proof. The best safety to avoid tank drainage is to drill a small hole in both intake and outflow tubing several inches below the usual water line. If you drill the intake tubing and you want to run your filter during your water changes, you need to stay below the low water mark of the water changes or turn your filter off.

I have had canisters for 25 years, never more than a slow drip. I set my canisters in a shallow bowl just to catch that sort of thing but its rare. Usually only after I take the canister apart for cleaning. Sometimes the o ring needs a little vaseline.
 

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I have had canisters for 25 years, never more than a slow drip. I set my canisters in a shallow bowl just to catch that sort of thing but its rare. Usually only after I take the canister apart for cleaning. Sometimes the o ring needs a little vaseline.
I sometimes have o-ring issues with my Fluval 305. Is vaseline the generally accepted way to improve the o-ring seal?
 
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