The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks,
first, i'm still pretty new at this, but will give what details i can. ..
i dont know the name of this plant, but i have a feeling it is pretty common, as it came in a plant package from AZaquaticgardens about a year ago.
it was doing wonderfully in my first tank, but then i decided to relocate it to my ram tank. same ph (7.4ish) , same substrate, same water hardness, same t5 lighting, co2 every other month...... flurish every week, per the instructions.

the other plants in the tank look awesome (chain sword, and corkscrew val)

this one plant however, is falling apart. ..
here are some pics.








as a thank you, here is a picture of the baby snapper my gf and i found on our driveway last week.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,221 Posts
I bet it is melting because you moved it. Are new leaves forming that are normal? If so just remove the nasty leaves and it will grow right back.

It looks like the 'Rose' sword plant I had a few years ago. A tank swallower. One filled half filled my 5x2x2' tank. Beautiful plant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
exactly, there are several very strong looking leaves in the middle, and then the outlying ones are dying. . ... trim them away?
and yea, that was the primary reason for moving it. .. it completely filled my 30g
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
Kathyy is right - it's a transplant stress, the roots were disturbed and trying to regrow; when it's well-rooted again, it will recover. Remove the melting leaves - nutrients are lost from those leaves and it can get infected just like an open wound. If you look closely at the picture, the new leaf growth looks healthy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeap, it is probably going though an acclimation period. Cut the VERY poor leaves off, and wait for new growth. It might take a little while.

What is your substrate?
sounds good. will trim it this afternoon. substrate was a generic homedepot sand. was washed before using it, and it has worked very well in the past. the eel likes it, and the snails and shrimp love rooting through it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,732 Posts
If you're using diy co2, why not just get a 2 liter bottle and diy another one. It'll work better than the little hagen unit anyways.

Co2 is best done in "consistent" ways. Co2 fluctuations will cause all kinds of problems, from deficiencies to algae.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Kathyy is right - it's a transplant stress, the roots were disturbed and trying to regrow; when it's well-rooted again, it will recover. Remove the melting leaves - nutrients are lost from those leaves and it can get infected just like an open wound. If you look closely at the picture, the new leaf growth looks healthy.
another silly question im sure, but how close to the stalk would you trim the leaves? i have trimmed them with about 1/4" left to the stalk, not sure if that is too much or too little.
thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,701 Posts
yes, i use a hagen diy co2 setup, and switch it back and forth between my two planted tanks. one month on, one month off. seems to work pretty well.
What makes you think that's good ? That would be analogous to you living in an low oxygen atmosphere. You could do it but not very well. Plants need carbon and co2 is the very best way to give it to them. Don't deprive them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
well, all of the plants have been very healthy so i never gave it a second thought. this plant only degraded after moving it to a new tank.

just did water changes and trimmings all afternoon, so i went ahead and swapped over the co2 to this tank while i was at it.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top