The Planted Tank Forum banner

Burns on plants

658 5
Hello!

I'm new to planted aquariums, and fairly new to aquariums in general. I have a 5 month old 36 galon aquarium with 3 plants of unknown type. I don't have specialized lights nor a fertilizing procedure.

I bought these plants about a month ago, and I've started to notice that 2 of them have what appear to be burns on their leaves.

My water levels are at:

Amonia 0
Nitrates 15
Nitrities 0
pH 5.7

Is there anything that I should be doing to improve the plants without interfering with the water quality for the fish?

thanks in advance!



1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Are these real?
Joined
·
15,763 Posts
Hi zedola, welcome to the Planted Tank!

I wouldn't call that "burns", rather "dying leaves".

We'll need to look at mainly two things for successfully growing plants: Lights and nutrients. Regarding light, this is often the problem. Regular storebought aquariums come with light fixtures that are merely enough to see your fish, not enough to keep plants alive. This could be the culprit.

The other possibility, if you have decent light, plants require nutrients. You mention that Nitrates are around 15ppm which should be sufficient. There are other nutrient deficiencies possible, but my first guess (without further info) would be lack of light.

BTW you linked to the same picture twice...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I'd recommend adding some liquid fertilizer once or twice a week. I'd also recommend buying Flourish fertilizer tabs. Stick the tabs (they look like black licorice) in your gravel substrate. This will promote root growth. Some of the plants' roots die often when transporting the aquatic plants from your LFS to home or when planting burying the roots in the new tank.

Good luck with your tank! Aquatic plants will greatly benefit your tank. After bringing home plants, you might need to adjust your lighting to their needs. Researching the plants before you buy them will help you save money so you don't buy plants that won't die in your aquarium's water parameters.

Vallisneria needs a higher pH than your tank. This plant likes a pH of ~6.5-7.5. The leaves could be burning from the high acidity in the water. I'm not positive what kind of plant the one on the right is. It likely needs a higher pH, too. 5.7 is lower than average of what most marketed freshwater plants need.

Your pH is pretty low. You can find pH Up^ at your LFS. This will help neutralize your water and help prevent the loss of your plants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much for your quick responses!

I've just double checked my pH readings and it's around 6. I'm a bit weary of ph up because it introduces one more variable to worry about when doing water changes and it could potentially affect the fish. However, it being this low could also represent a problem so I'll have to start looking at solutions.

As far as the light goes, I only have a standard fishtank bulb. I'll have to go shopping for a better light. Is there a particular one you would recommend for a lightly planted aquarium?

I'll go scout other threads for more info.. Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Your pH is likely fine, as long as it doesn't shift drastically. If it does, you may want to check your KH. I would avoid things like pH Up for precisely the reason you articulate. If you find your KH is low and you do need something to buffer you against pH swings, you could look into crushed coral or baking soda.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
i have found this to be a nutrient definciency normally when you introduce new plants to a tank the leaves on the plant die and new ones sprout while it gets used to the water difference. i wouldnt worry too much just make sure to give them enough fertilizer and root tabs they will soon pick up :)
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top