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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I just bought some buce (red cherry) 2-3 weeks ago, and I put them on some driftwood. They seemed to be doing okay and each clump produced a new leaf or two in that time, but I’ve also noticed that some of the old growth is developing mushy patches, mainly at the tip of the leaf. Additionally, some of these same leaves have started to yellow near the tips as well.

The tank is currently going through a fishless cycle, and I’m curious if maybe buce is sensitive to high levels of nitrite or nitrate?

In the tank, I have moss, several Java ferns, and a mini bolbitis difformis and they seem to be doing ok. It’s just the bucephalandra that is struggling. I did think maybe the plants are converting to their submersed form but they seem to already have their submersed leaves...

pH ~ 7.4-7.6
Ammonia - 0
Nitrite - 0.25 ppm
Nitrate - 40 ppm
I haven’t tested my TDS or hardness but according to my city’s tap water records, it averages around 229 and 149, respectively.
I have no co2 but dose excel... but I’m not sure if I want to keep it up because if it’s pros vs cons. I also use the UNS all one 2x a week, but at a slightly lower dose than is recommended because my lighting is not too strong (I did turn the light up to 100% for the photos tho, btw). I also went down to 6 hours (from 8) a day or two ago because I was getting diatoms on the upper plants.

Sorry this is kind of long, but any help would be much appreciated! I’ve looked online but haven’t found anything to be super helpful. Also, this is my first post so I’m sorry if this is in the wrong place or something.

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Less mature tanks do seem to melt buce in my experience. Having diatom growth is also a sign that your tank is still biologically immature. Buce are pretty hardy plants so once your tank is fully cycled, you should see them bounce back as long as the rhizomes are healthy. I didn't see a temperature, but buce do best in cooler water than warmer water. I would assume the temp isn't the issue, unless you're cranking it up like 80+ for certain fish (can be successfully grown though) I think time is the only answer here. I personally always add some Seachem stability in new setups to help jump start the cycling process, but that's just my process. gl
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Less mature tanks do seem to melt buce in my experience. Having diatom growth is also a sign that your tank is still biologically immature. Buce are pretty hardy plants so once your tank is fully cycled, you should see them bounce back as long as the rhizomes are healthy. I didn't see a temperature, but buce do best in cooler water than warmer water. I would assume the temp isn't the issue, unless you're cranking it up like 80+ for certain fish (can be successfully grown though) I think time is the only answer here. I personally always add some Seachem stability in new setups to help jump start the cycling process, but that's just my process. gl
Oh, the tank is currently at 75. And thanks, I’ll look into seachem stability👍🏼

Oh, the tank is currently at 75. And thanks, I’ll look into seachem stability👍🏼
 

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16g rimless cherry shrimp, 20g cube dwarf cichlid, 40g breeder nano community.
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I had a few recent buce do this and most of them seem to be coming back okay. A couple just didn't. It was also a new tank.
 
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