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Sorry for what is certainly a newbie question. Had non-planted tanks for years but just getting started with planted tanks. Read up for a while, started new tank with plants, and...

I have this plant (actually not sure what it is, I got the names of the others I purchased but somehow not this one...I'm sure it's common, this was petco, not the local fancy shop) in a tall 56 gallon. Has nice new growth, but...

Tank is about a month old, so typical brown diatoms for this point in cycle but what is on the plant, while looking like diatoms doesn't rub of easily, as it does from glass or other surfaces. It does seem to be slowly killing the leaves it is on.

Water is virtually to no ammonia, no nitrites, and 5ppm nitrate. Two led light (not plant specific bars) at full power most of the day. I have done 5ml of flourish once a week.

Any idea of this is really diatoms or something else wrong with plant, since it really won't rub off easily? Any suggestions to help get it fixed? (Any idea what the plant is, I also ask embarrassingly...?)

Thanks in advance all!
 

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That plant is Hygrophila difformis (water wisteria).
The bottom portion (older leaves) are emersed (above water) leaves, and the newer growth leaves that you see look a lot different are it's immersed/submersed form leaves.

Those do look like Diatoms/Brown "Algae". Because those leaves are emersed form, they will eventually melt off since it's not meant for submersed conditions (not a problem, it's already transitioned new growth). Since the older emersed leaves aren't suited for submersed growth, those leaves won't do well and it allows algae to take over that portion. Not really an issue.

If diatoms are forming on healthy submersed leaves, then you have an excess of silicates in the tank. Diatoms are common for newer set up tanks (up to being just a few months new) and they usually go away on their own. You should be able to rub it off with your fingers. They aren't a big problem unless they smother the plants not allowing light to the leaves. Quite a few fish, shrimp and snails eat diatoms.

Don't worry about the old emersed leaves getting covered. You can actually cut those leaves off or even cut off the bottom emersed stem portion and replant the new growth if you wanted.
 
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