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I've got a ton of small brine shrimp. I feed them water, the water is in a 20 oz bottle. i spray painted the bottle, so the stuff i put in the water (different types of fish food and algae discs) will most and make a good food for them. i also add crushed shell in there water to help make them even healthier. i don't have anything to enrich them at the moment, but they are very healthy and they are feed well.

i can send i'd say about 3 or so 20oz bottles with baby brine shrimp. i can't really estimate how many will be in there. i'd say a couple thousand or more. but really, i don't know. i will scoop up a bunch to make sure there is a good quantity in there. but it will most likely be plenty for your fry or whaetever you use them for. but i don't like to over populate them in the bottle, i want them to have enough room to make the trip. (yes, i even care about the smallest of animals =P )

i'd say like $7 a bottle would be good? if that sounds cheap or expensive, give an offer.

also, i figure i might as well offer this also.

maby like $2 for a 20oz bottle of young brien shrimp food. this is the same stuff my shrimp thrive on. it is milkey and cloudy, perfect for the babies. but listen closely, it does SMELL. so when feeding the brine shrimp, quickly open the bottle, poor some of the milky water in, close the bottle, and walk away for a minute or too. it's not like deadly smell like a dead animal, but it does smell a bit like a 10 gallon aquarium with a dead clam.

the $2 for the food is if you buy it at the same time you buy the shrimp, if you buy it seperatly, it's $3. (little marketing going on)

hope these prices are ok. i'm sure your fry or whatever your feeding them too will love them. there also good pets as well, there large enough to be seen squirming around, but still young. there will be a very small amount of brine shrimp shell sent. i try to get the shell away from the shrimp but sometimes the eggs float aorund, get in my net, and so on.
 

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Baby brine shrimp

I don't think he was trying to be rude but if you dont feed the baby shrimp to your fry right away they lose thier efectiveness as a food source.

Here is a quote from the net.

If one does not feed the shrimp to the the larvae within about 8 hours (8 hours is on the high side of the equation), the shrimp lose a significant percentage of the shrimp's original nutritional advantage. The shrimp use that nutritional value for their own development as it was intended, but because of their rapid development, musch of that value become waste into the water column. There are ways to compensate for that nutritional lose but the methods are more complicated and costly than simply feeding the nauplii within the eight hour window (a window that may narrow as the temperature of the shrimp hatching water goes up).
 

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Newly-hatched BBS are a great food source for fry and small fish because they are loaded with fat and very high in energy. The fat profile is also very high in essential fatty acids.

Brine shrimp that are a few days old, even well-fed examples, are nearly worthless as a food source other than a "treat" food. Within 24 post-hatch hours they are down to about 35% (iirc) of their original nutritional value.

Brine shrimp can be gut-loaded, but it costs more to gut-load them significantly than to hatch more. If you really want to feed gut-loaded brine shrimp they are available at any LFS in frozen form for less than $10. It doesn't make a lot of sense to ship them because shipping would cost more than they cost locally.

Quick note: Feeding brine shrimp less than 24 hours post hatch is also a waste. They don't have mouths yet. You are just poluting the water column.
 

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i don't usually feed them until a day or so old.

and lots of people will buy young shrimp. most people buy them and then they gut-load them thereselves.

there are tons of reasons people would buy my brine shrimp even though thee not gut-loaded.
 

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Brine shrimps are most nutritious when they're newly hatched and start consuming their yolk immediately after hatching. The best time to be feeding baby brine shrimp is actually in the first 6 hours after hatching. After then, the nutritional content is basically lost.
 

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and i know that they loose there nutritional value, most people that have brine shrimp know this already. also, it was already pointed out by someone earlier.

there are still lots of people that will buy brine shrimp....

some people like them as pets, some people want to raise them to adulthood, but don't want to set up a hatchery. there are lots of reasons and people that will still buy them.

so could everyone stop pointing out info about why someone wouldn't buy them? some people like to 'gut-load' them themselves with there own products and stuff. so stop pointing out stuff -_-
 

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Here is an article I read a few years ago.

Supplementing Newly Hatched Artemia
By Bill Vannerson,
with contributions from David Kawahigashi and Eric Lund


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There was a discussion on several Internet email lists regarding supplementing newly hatched baby brine shrimp (BBS), Artemia, with vitamins or calcium. The results of that discussion brought two important points to light. One, hobbyists can supplement their BBS to add valuable nutrients to their fish, both fry and adults. Two, the power of the Internet can be a valuable resource.

Supplementing Baby Brine Shrimp
Supplementing live food is nothing new. Many hobbyists have been adding vitamins to their worm cultures before feeding to fish and, to a lesser extent, adult brine shrimp as well. The strategy is to have the supplement ingested by the food and then by the fish when they consume the food.

The debate on the mailing lists started when someone questioned the effectiveness of applying this technique to BBS. Would supplements added to the hatching water be ingested by brine shrimp nauplii and then consumed by the fish? Or would the supplement simply stay suspended in the hatching water without providing any additional value to our fish?

The answer comes down to whether or not newly hatched Artemia will consume the supplement. The answer is "Yes" — but not right away. Artemia are filter feeders, but they don't start feeding until after their second molt, referred to as the "instar 2 stage."

According to David Kawahigashi, the commercial fisheries have been practicing this for quite a while.

Supplementing nutritional components, such as vitamins or calcium, into live brine shrimp has been practiced by aquaculture hatcheries for around 10 years. This bio-enrichment or bioencapsulation of brine shrimp nauplii (instar 2 or adults) began using emulsified fish oils containing high HUFAs, or highly unsaturated fatty acids, for marine finfish and crustacean larvae. This "breakthrough" enabled the culture of many other new marine species to be developed (flounder, sea bass, tuna, ornamental marine species).

Why Supplement?
Eric Lund, researcher from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, explains:

Briefly, saltwater fish all require a fatty acid that is common in marine fish oils called DHA (docosahexanoic acid) in their diet. They cannot make it from precursors, so it must be present in their food. Freshwater fish have a limited ability to make DHA from a particular precursor fatty acid of the omega-3 variety (linolenic acid), but they too can grow and reproduce well on a diet that includes DHA.

Brine shrimp are a great food for all small carnivorous fish, but they contain virtually no DHA. Marine fish larvae fed only Artemia exhibit mass mortality a few days after they start feeding. Aquaculture operations get around this problem by adding an emulsion of phospholipids rich in DHA to newly hatched Artemia. The Artemia eat the emulsion (more of it also sticks to the outside of their bodies). The Artemia are then fed to the fish or can then be kept refrigerated for up to 3 days.

Enriching or bioencapsulation of Artemia is essential for marine fish, but not for freshwater fish. Then why bother at all? Eric further explains:

I do believe, however, for some delicate killies [and other freshwater fish] that experience high moralities before sexing out, that enriching Artemia may be of some benefit. Another tactic worth trying is to feed enriched Artemia to the adults for several weeks prior to breeding them. In other species, fish eggs with low levels of DHA generally have poorer survivorship to first feeding than eggs that are rich in DHA. Giving females a diet high in DHA allows them to put more DHA into their eggs. As you all know, weak and feeble killie fry can be the result of several factors, including inbreeding, bad water conditions, and improper incubation conditions, but poor parental nutrition may play a role as well.
 

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I'm closing this thread since it has taken a tangent. There's a good amount of info in regards to gut feeding and so on.

Edit: Had some issues with PT earlier and couldn't close it.
 
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