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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am setting up my 45 gallon tank with the intention of breeding shrimp. My question is, with enough vegetation, will it be possible for CHerry shrimp to breed with a school of say... neons in the tank? Or will it simply become food for them?

I'm curious how I should go about this... Either breed them in a seperate tank and add them to this tank which will be my show tank, or have them breed in here...
 

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It depends on the kind of fish. I had good scucess with them re-polulating with very non-agressive types of fish. If you are plannng on doing this to sell, I would consider a separate tank. Just my thoughts.

chaz
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This isn't to sell.. more for show.. I love shrimp and am planning on keeping at least 8 varieties in this tank, I was just hoping to be able to have enough cherries breeding to keep a large population going, nothing commercial scale.

I'm really only thinking about having 30 neons in here for fish... maybe a couple of dwarf cichlids like blue rams.. nothing more
 

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You can definetaly have cherries breed in a tank of neons. I have cardinals, phantom tetras, rummynose, and cherry barbs in my tank with Cherries.

I think the key is starting with adult shrimp, and having plenty of hiding places for the babies.

Blue Rams are probably not a good idea
 

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Or will it simply become food for them?

I'm curious how I should go about this... Either breed them in a seperate tank and add them to this tank which will be my show tank, or have them breed in here...
If the fish get the babies they will become food for the fish. if you want better yeild or don't want to have any babies eaten then breed them in a seperate tank and add them when large enough.
 

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Maybe allow them to build up their population in your tank for a few months bfore adding fish. By then the shrimp might have a big enough population that they'll reproduce fast enough so the fish won't get all the babies.
 

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Gareth,
Once you have the moss bed established you'll have no problems keeping Cherries with most small tetras.

The newly hatched babies are not much more than 1mm in length so a thick patch of anything (moss/Pellia/Riccia/Baby Tears/etc...) will give them all the protection they need. By the time they're 4-5mm they'll be safe to graze out in the open.

Just keep your fish well fed and they should show very little interest in hunting down a meal. :)
 

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I know fish have predatory instinct to chase anything that may become a potential meal. I had guppy fry in the same tanks with neons and cardinals before. Although the tetras would give a quick chase for the fry, they (tetras) would give up once the fry has gone out of sight. Unlike some of the more predatory fish that would chase the fry and eventually hunt it down.

I also had always seen my cardinals and neons eat food that have gone through the middle area of the tank. I never saw them go for food on the surface or on plants or substrate. Therefore, I would have to think majority of the baby shrimp should be safe, unless they venture out and swim throughout the tank. But those that remain hidden in plants, like in java moss, should be safe.
 

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I had a growing population with neons and black neons. Blue rams will eat all but the biggest shrimp, and may even harass the larger shrimp to death.
 

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The tank you have planned sounds like a really nice tank!

One thing to think about with shrimp and fish is that fish are predators of most shrimp so the shrimp wont swim around the tank like they would with out fish. I would go with just shrimp first for a few months... if you STILL want fish get something small like a small group of neons or some dwarf rasabora or something.

Also, DO NOT keep rams and shrimp. They will hunt them all down!

So have some fun with this tank!
-Andrew
 

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I have a 5.5 gallon with 10 boraras urophthalmoides. The shrimp breed quite happily in the tank. I actually had the fish in before the first batch of babies were even born. I'd imagine some babies DO get eaten, but some offspring definitely reach maturity. And this is in a small tank! If you aren't worried about yields then I'd imagine you would be fine breeding cherries in a tank with neons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well I am hoping that along with the moss, the shrimp will find ample hiding places in the slate wall I just built.

This is the first draft, I will probably tear it down and redo once I get a few more pieces of slate in. This layout was more for testing out the idea...

 

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That looks REALLY GOOD! I hope in the end you somehow attach it all to make it stable because I would be really scared of having a shattered tank if something fell!

Shrimp will love that tank!

-Andrew
 

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Wow I agree with Fish Newb!! That looks amazing with that background! Great job:thumbsup: I can't believe you are going to redo it:icon_surp
 

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With all that rock and eventually all the plant cover your shrimp will have no problem multiplying. Cardinals are not a seek and destroy type of fish and in my personal experience with the same combination my cherries have bred like crazy. The fish that give shrimp the most trouble are the slow methodical hunters such as badis, cichlids, gouramies, pencil fish, etc. These type of fish will wait out shrimp in cover and take their time looking for food. Still schooling fish can be troublesome, but when kept well fed tend less to search for food in dense cover. Go for it.
 
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