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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can all these be bred in one tank? I realized oto's may be hard to breed, but i've heard in the presence of spawning pygmy cories, they can be bred.
Do the micro rasboras need blackwater conditions to breed? And is peat in the system recommended for these? Also, where would one obtain peat?
 

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no they cant all breed together, cories need cold water to be introduced to be breed , the rasboras would get ick , quick. ahah rhyming, n e ways good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ahh, that stinks. Maybe i will try white clouds then, or something to that affect.
 

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no they cant all breed together, cories need cold water to be introduced to be breed , the rasboras would get ick , quick. ahah rhyming, n e ways good luck
I would disagree with the ich issue. I'd ask Dufus first when was the last time he bought a new fish and introduce them in the main tank and if he had an ich issue before. There may not be ich but stress would be the main concern as stress is often the one that triggers various diseases due to low immunity of fish. The decreasing of temperature is not by all of a sudden unless the room temperature there is quite cold or a winter storm appearing(I've heard news that US has winter storms but never heard about Texas' weather).

I'll add that ich appears only when you introduce an unuquarantined fish. Ich serves as a 'contaminant' and will not appear unless introduced by carriers.

Peat is obtained in most pet stores. Avoid the ones for horticultural uses. Who knows what those kind of peat may contain. Driftwoods and blackwater extract are also another alternatives for peat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks. I definatly am considering peat and am definatly going with driftwood.
I don't even have the tank set up yet, but am researching beforehand. I think slightly sudden, slightly cooler temp. drop triggers cory spawns b/c it's like the rains of the amazon. It may trigger the rasbo's too, who knows. I'll see how it goes when i get it all ready.
 

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no, to breed cories you need to introduce cold water! and cold water being intoduced causes ick. a gentlemen i spoke with said hes breed cories many times and he said he lowered the water to half way and introduced cold water and that madce them spawn because in the wild the breed in the rainy season when the cold water from the mountains hit the warm of the river.


ick ( thats the correct spelling , not ich) isnt introduced to the tank and its not a contaminent. it is a parasite which youre tank will get if the water temp changes sometimes by only a few degrees. the rasboras WILL get ick .

jordan
 

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i'm going to have to disagree with joejoeg

how would your fish ever get ich (which is also considered correct nomenclature since the name of the parasite is Ichthyophthirius) if it is not present in the water?

you could lower the water temperature as much as you want and the fish won't get ich if the parasites are not present

basically just agreeing with what Bluebell said

i'd imagine both oto's, cory's and the rasboras would require soft, acidic water to spawn

not sure about the water temperature since i've never tried breeding them, but say the temp is 78 F a drop to 74 F or 72 F would seem sufficient...just my 2 cents

i've heard of people having their cories/otos spawn and breed without ever making a conscientious effort to lower the water temperature
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
no, to breed cories you need to introduce cold water! and cold water being intoduced causes ick. a gentlemen i spoke with said hes breed cories many times and he said he lowered the water to half way and introduced cold water and that madce them spawn because in the wild the breed in the rainy season when the cold water from the mountains hit the warm of the river.
jordan
This is what i was trying to say.
I think ich will not be much of a problem if i keep the fish healthy enough. Ich is NOT caused by temperature change UNLESS it stresses the fish too much, which considering i would only lower it 10* max., i don't think that would stress them too much. And, if so then i will go with white clouds or other small, cold tolerant fish.

I am planning to breed dwarf crays, cherry shrimp, oto's, pygmy cories, and micro rasboras in the same tank. Call me crazy, but i'm gonna try it anyway.

I know cherries and dwarf crays can tolerate lower temperature than most fish, so they're ok.

Now, the water condition is gonna be a major issue.
My water comes from a limestone well, making it ~ P.H~8, Gh- hard as a rock!(my test kit won't even start reading it!)

But, i am hoping to get an R/o system a few months after this tank is going. So in the meantime, The ADA amazonia and peat filtration should help, plus i may use a water softner pillow+ Grocerystore R/O water, which brings me to my next question.

What trace formula is best for amazon/SE asian enviroment?
(ie: instant amazon;blackwater extract;blackwater pro;etc.)
 

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ick ( thats the correct spelling , not ich) isnt introduced to the tank and its not a contaminent. it is a parasite which youre tank will get if the water temp changes sometimes by only a few degrees. the rasboras WILL get ick .
Well, we have different opinions anyway but it is a misconception that ich is part of the tank's ecosystem. How would you say such parasites would be introduced merely because of water changes? They are not part of the tank's ecosystem as I had reiterated. They often appear because they weren't detected for a long time until the fish becomes stressed. As I said, ich appears only if introduced via a carrier which is usually a new fish and will not live long enough to find a new host if the temperature soars to above 84 as most often, ich does not tolerate such temperature.

Look at the case of Seastar, if you read her thread, she hasn't encountered ich for a long time until she introduced her new fish and a jewel cichlid unknowingly wreaked havoc on her community. Even if there were stress-related factors, ich will not appear until introduced by a new fish which has not been quarantined. Quarantining a new fish is very important and prevention is better than cure.;)

As for the suggestion of cold water, I don't know how it's going to affect the fish. I'd rather lower the heater's thermostat than to introduce cold water. Simply relate it to the use of cold cubes of bloodworms, fish are not going to be comfortable with the sudden drop of the temp by a very large difference when they reach for the bloodworms to eat hence thawing bloodworms is recommended instead of dropping the cube directly to the tank. So how cold is cold water you're talking about?
 

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i'm going to have to disagree with joejoeg

how would your fish ever get ich (which is also considered correct nomenclature since the name of the parasite is Ichthyophthirius) if it is not present in the water?

you could lower the water temperature as much as you want and the fish won't get ich if the parasites are not present
I agree with your statement, Bobby.:) It makes me wonder why the spelling of ich and ick is still a fuss.:icon_neut If you look at the scientific name, in no way would it become 'ick' in short.;)
 

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I am planning to breed dwarf crays, cherry shrimp, oto's, pygmy cories, and micro rasboras in the same tank. Call me crazy, but i'm gonna try it anyway.

I know cherries and dwarf crays can tolerate lower temperature than most fish, so they're ok.
No offense dufus, but this won't work pretty certain here.


Dwarf crays won't like big temp swings and most other things wont either! Get a tank for each type of critter and you should be fine, But I doubt you will have too much luck with ottos they are VERY VERY VERY hard.

Go try it tho, Try and prove me wrong! If you get those to breed lmk I'll definatly trade you or buy some of your crays/fish

-Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yea, i realized the crays won't like it.
I may stick to breeding the inverts only then, but i still may try to breed the rest by just giving them all the conditions they need except for the temp. drop.

My original idea was to breed shrimp and crays, but after reading about the other inhabitants i wanted, i decided i wanted to try to breed them.
Maybe i can breed the micro rasboras anyway though.
 

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alright disagree with me if you will , but ich does not come with an introduction!.... take youre tank that youve added no new fish to for months dump cold water in there(by a few degrees) youre going to get ick! ick does live in the aquarium , i own discus , explain to me why i have got ick in the tank when i havent added 1 new fish in a year? if ick doesnt live in the aquarium how do you get it ?


i disagree with you.
 

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ick does live in the aquarium , i own discus , explain to me why i have got ick in the tank when i havent added 1 new fish in a year?
What is your temperature? I doubt temp lower than 30oC killed all the ich parasites completely. Ich can remain undetected with or without any stress-related factors.
if ick doesnt live in the aquarium how do you get it ?
Your temp may have failed to kill the ich parasites entirely. The remaining ones can reproduce without being detected until your fish succumb to stress.

I still respect your statements although we just have different opinions.;)
 

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ok but this is the thing,
bobby wrote:how would your fish ever get ich (which is also considered correct nomenclature since the name of the parasite is Ichthyophthirius) if it is not present in the water?

you could lower the water temperature as much as you want and the fish won't get ich if the parasites are not present


the ick is present in youre aquarium , it lives in the aquarium thats how you can get ick, i dont have a problem with my discus i was using them as an example from awhile ago. so when you have a raspbora and a cory and lower the temp ( thats the way ive always known) you can potentionally get ick, i spell it ick because if you reasearch it it is spelt as ick, i guess both ways are right. thank you for letting me atleast know you respect my posts.
 

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There's no reason for someone to disrespect others' opinions. We are entitled to our own opinion and everyone's case is still different from each other.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
To tell you the truth, i kinda believe in a mix of both of your opinions.
I think ich is brought about by infected fish, even if it doesn't show. Then it lives dormant in the gravel until a fish becomes suseptable(stress).
Lower temperature does'nt really bring it out, it makes the fish stress and the ich more active.

High temperature doesn't kill it, it shortens the lifespan and weakens it. A U.V sterilizer essentially does the same thing, only 10X better, significantly shortening its life span and getting rid of algae!

I have been lazy about expressing my opinion on this topic, but now i feel it needs to be said.
joejoeg- of course we respect your posts, the more opinions, the better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Now, on breeding
I found this site on microrasboras- AquariumFish.com :: Aquarium Fish International :: The monthly magazine for both novice and expert aquarium hobbyists.

The guy said that he breeds them in ph~7.6 and gh~12
He says his shoal has an alpah male and he is the only one that breeds. they breed every morning now that they started.

pygmy cories
the guy said his shoal breeds in a big group after a no more than 10* temp. drop.
they pair up and breeed in the T form. the female deposits one egg and carries it in her clasped ventral fins to a good spot(leaves, moss, silicom) where she places it w/her mouth and the couple lays the rest.
the fry are left in the tank b/c Corydoras pygmyeous doesn't eat it's spawn.
In a few weeks there are small tadpole things that eat rotifers swimming around the gravel.
They eat rotifers until big enough to eat parent's food.
They grow to the masive size of 1/2" in just 6 weeks(or months can't remember)
when they are breed ready. AquariumFish.com :: Aquarium Fish International :: The monthly magazine for both novice and expert aquarium hobbyists.
 

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besides saying thank you , it seems like youre on youre way with breeding tobad youre in texas i need a school of cories:)
 
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