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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hellooo everyone! Here I’ll (try) to keep an updated log of my attempt to raise amano zoas. Also, if anyone here has tried or successfully raised any shrimp, please let me know! I’d love to know the parameters and how you did it!

The eggs haven’t hatched yet, but these are the parameters I’m going to aim for from what I’ve read.
Salinity 35 PPT
pH 8-8.1
20-30% wc everyone two or three days
(I don’t have the proper test kits for other parameters, :p so I won’t be including anything else)
Oh, and I’ll see if I can get a bigger container, but I have an approx. 1.3 gallon (almost 5L) plastic container to raise them in. I also have access to clean blue water straight from the ocean.

:)
 

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I haven't heard of anyone having any success using literally ocean water! But there's a first for everything! ;)


Here are a couple of threads worth reading over!


 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Soo the eggs hatched last night! This morning I’m tasked with removing the zoas… Unfortunately, some of the eggs didn’t hatch on time, but I’ll try to tumble those and hatch them. Mother shrimp is still kicking eggs. I think I lost a few zoas to the freshwater though :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For those following the thread, here’s my daily log update:

Eggs hatched, female back in display tank. 50% of the eggs didn’t hatch, a further 30% of the zoas died over the time it took between hatching and me waking up to move them into salt water. From holding a light to the side of the tank, about 50-80 individual zoas are alive. Maybe closer to a hundred. Moved airline tube closer to the surface to reduce water flow. The surviving zoas appear to be alive and healthy, moving towards light like normal. I was disappointed with the lower yield of zoas, but I’ll have to work with what I have. In the future I’ll try keeping the female in the display tank, it could reduce stress and help the eggs hatch at once, possibly increasing zoa yield.

The female is acting weird, I hope she’ll be fine. Also, the green water I tried to grow for them failed, so I’ll have to try yeast while I grow another batch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For those still curious about my progress, here’s my daily update.

Fed yeast twice in small quantities. When a light was applied to the side of the tank for multiple minutes, only about 30-40 zoas appeared. I also didn’t observe any bodies at the bottom of the tank, so I am confused as to what happened. They may have remained at the other side of the tank without my knowledge. Other small organisms have also appeared in the tank, and they very well could have eaten the smaller zoas if the opportunity arose. The surviving zoas seem to have grown slightly, and also seem a little more mobile and adapted to the flow. I’ll look again tomorrow to check if there’s actually more, but for now I’ll say that about 50% of the zoas died over the first day.

Day 40 seems so far away. I hope at least a few survive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Daily update c:

30% water change. Other organisms are populating the tank in higher and higher quantities. The number of zoas is declining, maybe only one or two dozen left. The surviving ones haven’t grown much either. Fed yeast once, green water still hasn’t grown yet. In these cases this shows why a higher initial yield of zoas is definitely a huge benefit.

Chances are looking slimmer and slimmer. I’m pretty sure the female is saddled though, so I may have another opportunity soon
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Was a bit late with this one, but yesterday’s update:

More organisms have appeared. I’m almost sure they’re eating the smaller fry. The downsides of using blue water… Zoa population still hovering around two dozen, maybe a few less now. About 90% of life in the tank is other misc. creatures. The surviving zoas have grown slightly. I fed yeast three times over the course of the day. Diatoms are starting to grow on the bottom of the tank, but no fry have gotten stuck yet. The zoas don’t seem as attracted to light as usual. I don’t have high hopes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For those still following:
There’s only 10 zoas left, that’s all I could count. They aren’t attracted to the light at all, and they’re all moving super sluggishly. I think this is marking the end of my experiment for now. I’ll see if anything’s still alive in the morning. While there’s living zoas the experiment will continue, but I don’t think they’ll stay alive much longer.
:(
 

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I do wonder if a "light" filtration of ocean water could help at all.... i.e. through a coffee filter.would help.

I have easy access to hard water, but not saltwater. Maybe, at best, brackish water? As in, 1/6 level of saltwater... if the ocean is 35 ppt, then I guess the lake is less than 6 ppt? And brackish is considered to be around 17 ppt.... I have no clue! :LOL: Hard [fresh] water at the least...


You could try doing an experiment and set up three separate rearing containers. One full salinity, one 3/4 salinity, and one half. See if you can get diatoms growing in there, perhaps some greenwater and/or infosura and then split a new batch of juvies between them.


I would honestly love to try again but need to manage to get some actual amanos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
sad update :(
I don’t see any zoas. I fed yeast once. I’ll let the experiment run for another day in case I missed anything, but I think it’s safe to assume all the zoas died.

I do wonder if a "light" filtration of ocean water could help at all.... i.e. through a coffee filter.would help.

I have easy access to hard water, but not saltwater. Maybe, at best, brackish water? As in, 1/6 level of saltwater... if the ocean is 35 ppt, then I guess the lake is less than 6 ppt? And brackish is considered to be around 17 ppt.... I have no clue! :LOL: Hard [fresh] water at the least...


You could try doing an experiment and set up three separate rearing containers. One full salinity, one 3/4 salinity, and one half. See if you can get diatoms growing in there, perhaps some greenwater and/or infosura and then split a new batch of juvies between them.


I would honestly love to try again but need to manage to get some actual amanos.
That’s a good idea! I’ll try it if I get more zoas. If you end up getting shrimp and decide to try to rear some zoas, let me know how it goes!
 
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