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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just bought a Concoa 806-6805 Dual Stage regulator (Linked to Concoa's PDF spec sheet)




could use some post kit suggestions. mainly confused with the fitting sizes

I know i need to replace the 580 with a CGA320, get a 12v or 24v solenoid, and get a needle valve but that's about all i know lol

I have a Dici DC06-03 bubble counter/check valve already.

Plan is Regulator System -> Check Valve -> DIY Rex Griggs Reactor

Tank Specs: 55 gal (48 x 15.5 x 17.5) with a 29 gal sump.
Lighting: Planted+ 24/7 (24/7 mode)
1/3rd EI dosing + Daily 4ml glutaraldehyde

So far I'm debating between:
Solenoids: [STRIKE]Clippard Mouse vs[/STRIKE] Burkert 6011
Needle Valves: [STRIKE]Fabco nv-55 vs[/STRIKE] Ideal 52-1-12, leaning towards the Ideal
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just purchased everything i needed from diyco2regulator.com

They have a brass it for under 100. I opted to purchase everything in nickle so it was a bit more.

Also there are a few members here that have one for sale.
yeah i was looking at this kit CO2 Regulator Parts | CO2 For Planted Tanks And Home Brewing. CO2 Regulator Post Body Kit #1 earlier today

just wondering if it's worth spending a bit more to go with a

Burkert 6011 solenoid and something like a Hoke or ****** metering valve
 

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I would recommend the Clippard as I like the design far better than the Burkett/ Milwaukee styles that have large moving parts and use more electrical power. The problem with a sliding movement is that it tends to stick when we use that amount of heat and apply it for the long time we open the solenoid. The Clippard uses far less power (.67watt!) and only opens a tiny metal flap somewhat like a small engine reed valve.



CO2 Regulator Parts | CO2 For Planted Tanks And Home Brewing. CO2 Regulator Post Body Kit #1

The Fabco needle valve works well for me but I like the NV-55 rather than the larger NV-55-18. I find the 10-32 fitting work for me the way I operate.
 

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no, that is no problem.. BTW, it is not always recommended to use teflon on that side of the regulator.. Pieces can get into the reg itself..
Usually pipe dope is the recommended choice on the CGA side (personally all sides but that is just me)
 

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no, that is no problem.. BTW, it is not always recommended to use teflon on that side of the regulator.. Pieces can get into the reg itself..
Usually pipe dope is the recommended choice on the CGA side (personally all sides but that is just me)
Use locktite on the cga nipple, and don't use too much just a line 3 threads from the end of the nipple. Even dope can cause issues and some people use way too much

Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Use locktite on the cga nipple, and don't use too much just a line 3 threads from the end of the nipple. Even dope can cause issues and some people use way too much

Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk
which loctite do you recommend? Blue 242? I don't think i wanna use Red yet, won't be able to test out the regulator til some time next week
 

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which loctite do you recommend? Blue 242? I don't think i wanna use Red yet, won't be able to test out the regulator til some time next week
I use red personally. Don't have experience with the blue but as long as it isn't super runny you'll be okay

Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk
 

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which loctite do you recommend? Blue 242? I don't think i wanna use Red yet, won't be able to test out the regulator til some time next week
first a bit of "history" I suppose.. NPT threads are designed to mate and seal w/out any dope/tape/thread lock when tightened correctly.

UNFORTUNATELY thread quality is generally poor except for certain types (" NPTF, or "dryseal" thread is good for one tightening only, without using any sealant." ) so this is usually not a very successful plan.

I can't exactly argue against using loctite but, as a beginner and inexperienced, I'd just start w/ something like Rectorseal..

The "discussions" are endless..
Pipe Joint Sealants - Page 2

Maybe flax and oil.. ;) just kidding.
loctite PSt
Loctite 545
Loctite 567
 

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One thing not mentioned is the low pressure gauge. It has a really high range from 0 to 400PSI. This sounds good but for our use since we don't usually go very high pressure, the readings are a bit course. Each mark is ten PSI so it is hard to read a change that you might want to make from say 22 to 24. The change will be the same but a meter reading from 0-60 will let you see the change better. The meter will work well enough but if you wanted to spend $10-15 dollars for a different meter, it might be worth doing before you put it all together.
Not saying it has to be done, just a bit to think about as you move ahead.
 

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The reg will go up to 250psi..
Getting a gauge below 200psi is a risk.. tiny risk but still a risk..
Better possibility is one w/ a better dial..like this:


As long as you want to run above 10psi...
2" gauge though, not 21/2...
After 10psi marks are in increments of 2psi.. Theoretically much better than what is attached..

anyways plenty of gauges on "the bay"..
2 1/2 5psi increments w/vacuum:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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There are times when a bit of "why" is important to understanding "what" we need. Meters are one of those.
The reason for getting one that reads to a low range like 60PSI can give us a better look at the changes we make but it also can have a downside as mentioned. When we first open the valve on the tank and the regulator gets gas, it may take a bit of time (seconds?) before it get around to regulating the output. That means it may pass the high pressure on through to where the low pressure gauge sets and the high pressure can peg the meter to bend the internal parts or if high enough, it can actually blow out a part inside so that you have a leak.
So, in theory, putting a higher reading gauge can be less likely to blow if it can read to 300 rather than 60. Kind of a question if you are going to hit a 60PSI meter or a 300PSI meter as to which will last longer when hit with 1000-1500PSI? Maybe the 300 gets broken just a little while the 60 gets broken a whole bunch?

So a better plan is to avoid breaking/bending the meter by ALWAYS doing it right. You can avoid the damage by ALWAYS turning the working pressure adjustment fully counter-clockwise to shut off the gas flow, BEFORE you open the tank valve. That lets gas to the regulator, it gets the pressure regulated and THEN you turn the knob to let gas through and adjust the level. That's why I like a gauge that I can read and set back to the same place each time.
It is often good to have a meter that maxs out at about double what we would expect to use for pressure. So I might suggest looking for gauges in the 0-100 or 120 range at about $10-15.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
i removed the the high pressure (replacing with another gauge for aesthetics) by using a c-clamp and the edge of a table but i'm having trouble with removing the low pressure gauge with the same method

can i use anything to lubricate the low pressure gauge to remove it?
 

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i removed the the high pressure (replacing with another gauge for aesthetics) by using a c-clamp and the edge of a table but i'm having trouble with removing the low pressure gauge with the same method

can i use anything to lubricate the low pressure gauge to remove it?
Looks like both gauges used the same type of sealant..so no..not really..

For normal things heat always works BUT I don't recommend it for a regulator..
I've always found metal is stronger than any tape/sealant though.. ;)
 
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