The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I bought I think around 18 shrimp to start a colony from my local Petsmart. They were advertised as Blue Velvet shrimp. The tank I put them in has light color sand - not quite white but very light tan. These shrimp are super dark blue. One looks like a rili - blue with clear, but it's not in a blocky pattern, it's kind of random. One of the blue and clear shrimp is female and has a brown stripe down her back most of the time (she's pregnant again) - I had another one similar to this one but she sadly passed away, maybe old age?

Upon doing some light research, it seems BV are ligher than BD? BV are from the red rili line and BD are from the carbon rili line? Some of these shrimp are so dark they look almost black. The majority of the babies that have been born so far are very dark blue from a small size compared to other shrimp that take a little longer to color in. The shrimp below are not the darkest I have, these are kind of light compared to some of the ones I have (they were hanging upside from duckweed and I couldn't take a good photo since they basically look black with the lighting).




some more photos, a bit older, of the original colony:


 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,883 Posts
I bought I think around 18 shrimp to start a colony from my local Petsmart.
How long have you had them? How long has the tank been set up? What are your specific water parameters?

I had another one similar to this one but she sadly passed away, maybe old age?
It's quite possible. Just keep in mind that big box pet stores generally only sell adult shrimp that come from farm ponds in other countries. So they're pretty far into their life cycle when you get them.

One thing to remember about Neocaridina: their names don't really mean anything. They're just colors and there's often more than one way to reach a desired color. The only way to really know their genetics is to have a journal of some sort tracking their progress for several generations over several years. Beyond that, it's really just a guessing game.

My thoughts? You have some nice looking shrimp that appear to be healthy. If it were me in your shoes, I'd try to breed them to see what kind of coloration(s) develop and try my hand at perfecting each color variant that pops up. Only takes a few generations with most Neos and it's a great way to trade genetic lines with other hobbyists.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Tank originally was set up as a small betta sorority back in early April, then I moved them to a 20 tall and turned this into a shrimp tank. Most recent tests held a pH of 7.0, 0 ammonia and nitrtites, 5.0 ppm nitrates. My test strips that show GH and KH display in approximate mg/L and I found a water hardness conversion table but when I hear/see people say degrees I don't know if they mean french degrees or german degrees or degrees clark... so yeah my mg/L for GH and KH was around 0-25 GH and 60 mg/L KH.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,883 Posts
Sounds like it's a good environment for them.

My test strips that show GH and KH display in approximate mg/L and I found a water hardness conversion table but when I hear/see people say degrees I don't know if they mean french degrees or german degrees or degrees clark... so yeah my mg/L for GH and KH was around 0-25 GH and 60 mg/L KH.
Try to pick up a liquid kH and gH test kit when you can. Strips become unusable and inaccurate quite quickly, unfortunately. It will be helpful for you to have a better understanding of your tank's water hardness and then you can rule it out when it comes to molting/death issues.

Ideally, you'd have at least a couple degrees of kH in the tank and 8-10 gH (or something close) for Neos. They're adaptable, of course, but will really thrive in parameters like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Sounds like it's a good environment for them.



Try to pick up a liquid kH and gH test kit when you can. Strips become unusable and inaccurate quite quickly, unfortunately. It will be helpful for you to have a better understanding of your tank's water hardness and then you can rule it out when it comes to molting/death issues.

Ideally, you'd have at least a couple degrees of kH in the tank and 8-10 gH (or something close) for Neos. They're adaptable, of course, but will really thrive in parameters like that.
Thanks! I'm definitely going to look for a liquid testing kit, I did want to try the electronic pH testers and I found one that's sold with a TDS testing device so I figure I'll give that a try and see how it goes. The API KH and GH test for whatever reason isn't readily available on Amazon, I'll go look for something local or go out of town to a bigger fish store and find a liquid test if need be!

Looks like I need to buy some more Wondershells, this might take care of my super soft water problem.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,883 Posts
I did want to try the electronic pH testers
Most will require storage of the probe(s) in a specific solution when not in use and recalibration is almost always necessary prior to each use. So keep that in mind. pH really isn't too important when it comes to shrimp tanks as long as you know what hardness is. If I'm not injecting CO2 in a tank, I almost never check pH.

The API KH and GH test for whatever reason isn't readily available on Amazon, I'll go look for something local or go out of town to a bigger fish store and find a liquid test if need be!
Sera is a solid brand if they're available online or in your area. I use them for hardness testing.

Looks like I need to buy some more Wondershells, this might take care of my super soft water problem.
It'd be cheaper, easier and more precise to use baking soda to increase the kH of your water change water and to use something like Equilibrium or other gH-increasing mix to raise gH. You'd just add them to your water change bucket to get parameters where you'd ideally like them. Then do a partial water change. After 3-4 water changes over the course of a month, parameters will be close to where you want them. You could spend $10 on baking soda and Equilibrium and use them for several years. Could also mix your own gH salts but it's probably not worth the hassle in your use case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Sera is a solid brand if they're available online or in your area. I use them for hardness testing.
I think I can order their products online, I've seen them around in Aquarium Co-Op videos - I'm assuming it's a German brand? I've seen them around mostly online but not too much in stores. Sometimes I see some of their products at fish stores in larger metro areas. I also noticed a master test kit from Nutrafin that looked pretty comprehensive - only issue is I got to make sure I can find refills of the tests I use the most. I'm constantly buying more test kits because I burn through the nitrate and ammonia test kits like crazy lol
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,883 Posts
I'm assuming it's a German brand?
Yep. I like them for most everything when it comes to shrimp tanks. Though, on an established tank, you probably won't be testing anything very often. Maybe occasionally checking nitrates once you have all your hardness parameters in check.

I usually only have to test for ammonia when something goes wrong or when cycling a tank. Beyond that, a few times per year. gH and kH kits are about the only thing I have to buy more than once per year and for that I like Sera because they're much easier to read/see when it comes to color changes.

Outside of potential hardness issues, it sounds like your tank is on solid ground. So you don't have much to worry about at all. And before you know it, those shrimp will be reproducing like crazy.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top