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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About May of last year, I picked up a number of mischlings from ORHunterFisher, and ran them in a Mr. Aqua 11.4 tank. They absolutely rocked the tank in producing a lot of offspring. I have since sold some, spread some out to other tanks, etc. One thing, though, that I haven't done is anything with the Blue Bolt babies that hatched. I ended up with about 7 BB babies, and they are all what I would consider really nice, with a couple that are exceptional. The two highest end ones are literally almost completely dark powder blue from head to tail. So, this is all great, but what I am running into, is from what I can tell, the seven are all males! I'm not 100% positive, but they all sure look it. My thought was to move just the BB to their own tank, and see if anything develops. I think I would have a shot at some nice offspring given the parents - can't hurt to try.

Anyway, the questions that I have:
- Are BB m/f sex ratio anything special? Do people typically get more of one sex than another in BB offspring? I would have thought "law of averages" would have meant that I should have at least one female in my group, but maybe they don't follow a 50/50 chance?

- Do BB throw true BB offspring, or would I possibly get some blue pandas or other TB offspring as well? I already have a number of blue pandas from previous offspring, so the genes are running around in the tank. If the BB don't throw just BB babies, than I could just make a generic TB only tank and throw all the TBs in there, and that would take care of the m/f issue.

I guess based on the answers to the questions, another option might be to track someone down who has known BB females, and buy a few to add to mine to ensure a bit of diversity, and a m/f ratio to produce some offspring.

Thoughts from folks out there? Thanks!
 

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I haven't observed any special ratio about BB offspring, but what I have observe is they are hard to sex until very large size. I've sold a few very nice juvi BB that the buyers hoped they were male (as high grade male are hard to get), and ALL of them eventually get berried.

So, if they have large coverage of blue, I would think some will be female. For example this one, before she was berried, I thought she was a he ;-)



I have a tank of BB, I have not seen any non-BB TB babies, although I do see golden-looking babies once in a while.
 

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Unfortunately in my experience, Taiwan bee shrimp tend to come out with a significantly higher ratio of males than females. Several others here on TPT have similar observations. For me, I find it is 2/3 male and 1/3 female in general.

PS- Congrats!!! ;)
 

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If breeders have so many male TBs, why didn't they lower the price of these males so others could breed them with their crystals????
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This is great info, folks. It's good to know that the ratios I am seeing in TB are similar to others as well. I'm also encouraged by the fact that BB seem to be more difficult in determining their sex until they are older. I'm getting slightly better at identifying the CRS/CBS sexes, but it's still something I'm not great at. I'll keep waiting and let those mid sized ones grow out a bit more before worrying too much if they are m/f.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh, good grief!

So, in my TB tank where these BB are at, my GH had raised up on me to a higher level (GH:8) than what I like (about 5-6). So, I started doing three small water changes with pure RO water over a period of 6 days now. This is in a Mr. Aqua 11.4 tank, changing out maybe 2.5 to 3 qts of water. Anyway, one of my BB that I thought was a male (I thought they all were) is now berried. Not only that, but I have at least three other females in the tank that are also now berried. Before the water changes, I had 0 berried.

Changes I have made:
- About two weeks ago, started feeding bloodworms about every 4-5 days based on info I learned from others here.
- Dropped my GH from 8 to 6 over the last 6 days.
- Replaced my 2 Fluval Ebi lights with a Finnex Planted+ on this tank.

I think we can all agree it was the lighting that made the difference. :biggrin:

I guess we'll see what the BB mother puts out for babies in about a month. At least this will let me get another tank fully cycled to hold the BB shrimp, and after she hatches these, I can move her and the others to the new tank in a couple months.
 

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it was the water change. often this causes shrimp to molt which i'm sure got the males fired up to do their job.
yada yada yada berried females!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yeah, definitely the water changes kicked things into gear, though they have responded really well to the blood worms. I was surprised at how well they took to them. I'm curious if I had just done changes without lowering the GH if the same would have happened, or if the lowering of the GH to the more "desirable" levels is what really brought it on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sadly, with it being her first time, she ended up dropping the eggs. Bummer. I keep waiting for her to berry up again. Just need the patience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I would say about 10 to 12 day in or so. Not quite sure since she surprised me in being berried, so I don't know the actual number for sure. I know she didn't make it two weeks, though. She hasn't shown any ill effects since then, and I just reverted to topping off the water once I saw she was berried. I just chalked it up to her first time carrying a clutch, and hearing that TB's aren't always as robust with their clutches.
 
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