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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have both Rotala v. "Green" and ludwigia repens that both have black spots on the stems and leaves falling off in those areas.

I am dosing the N and M mixtures from pferts and root tabs.

It's a 29 gal tank with 55w 6500k pc from ahsupply

I used to have diy co2 but I have been slacking on changing the bottle.

Do any of you think this might be the factor?

Thanks in advance.
 

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I have the same problem with my rotala roundifolia. I put in a more efficient way of diffusing my diy co2 (hagen elite mini) and it seems to help. If anyone knows a more certain answer, I'd like to know as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On my green it is about half way up. on my repins i have one where it is at the very end and one where it's about half way down, this one might be caused because of light because it's behind another plant.

I'm going to start pumping co2 again and see if it helps.

As for the dosing, i have no idea what i'm dosing. I just follow the directions on the bottle and like i said before i dose the N and M solutions from pfertz

When i finish these I will mix my own firts.
 

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What substrate are you using? I've had something similar happen before, and it was in a deep sand substrate that started to get rotten pockets around some plants, causing the plants to rot and die.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The material i have works just like sand, it is inert ceramic pellets. (look at my pic to see them)

Is there anything I can do to prevent this?

When you say rotten pockets do you mean the air (ammonia) pockets in the sand? I've seen that before but never in my substrate.

Also, i forgot to mention that I have anacharis in the same area and it is growing like crazy.
 

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By rotten pockets, I mean anaerobic areas where bacteria have built up and made a nasty little pocket of gas (it's not ammonia, but I forget what it is, smells terrible though) and turned the sand a rotten black color...it happens when bits of organic matter get down into the sand and start to rot but the substrate is not stirred up ever to keep it from forming this nasty little bubble. The preventative is to either disturb your sand regularly (I use a small sized dowel rod to poke around in the sand during water changes), or have a bunch of malaysian trumpet snails as they burrow into sand. I guess some kuhli loaches could also work, as they burrow too. Another key is not to get sand substrates really deep. I can't really comment on your substrate, since it's not one I have ever used, but if the particles are very fine, I could see this happening. Not sure if this is your problem or not, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the info, i'll try poking around in the substrate and see if I see bubbles. If I do i'll get ready with the water change.

Also, How deep is too deep? Mine is about 1 inch and 1 1/2 in some areas.
 
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