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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there truly a difference between most "black rose" and most "chocolate" Neocaridina on the market? I like truly chocolate colored neos, but these seem to be hard to come by. I see a lot of shrimp being sold as variations on black/black chocolate/black rose/chocolate at once, not one or the other. Which leads me to question... is this an indication of confusion within the trade (at least in the United States), or does this mean they are actually variations of the same thing?

My impression is that "black rose" and "chocolate" are not the same thing, coming from different lines/originating color morphs. But it also appears black rose is variable, and you get brown colored individuals in black colonies. Does anyone have any insight? Could you get chocolates from black shrimp or vice versa? Will I get roughly the same shrimp if I buy some labeled black rose, as if I buy some advertised as chocolate?

I am rather interested in the genetics of ornamental shrimp and line breeding. Though the genetics of Neocaridina morphs are kind of foggy in some areas. I am considering trying a couple breeding projects, and thinking about picking up some chocolates. I did do some searching on the forums after threads about chocolate neos without a whole lot of luck so I am posting my own thread.
 

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Is there truly a difference between most "black rose" and most "chocolate" Neocaridina on the market?
They're all Neocaridina, so it's just a matter of coloration and getting darker. Some of each will look brown, some will look black. Some will even look darker depending upon what they eat. The names are really just made up by sellers.

Though, note that if you're buying from one of the shrimp-specific importers who resale adults instead of buying offspring from someone who has shrimp in their personal tanks? You won't know how they'll breed or reproduce in terms of coloration because the seller will have little, if any, idea. Despite what they claim on their website, of course.

Neo genetics for coloration aren't as defined as they are for Caridina. You essentially just have to cull and cull and cull to get color saturations you like. There's no magic about crossing one color with another because you won't get offspring that are cut and dry in terms of color - you'll always get a mix of potentially muddied colors until you cull and breed out whatever color you desire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I figured. Marketing is of course how companies sell more shrimp. That's basically what I've arrived at. It's so muddy that basically, if I want a specific brown color I'm going to let the shrimp do their thing and cull like crazy. I know color is going to be variable regardless, it's just a matter of selective breeding to get as consistent a color as possible. Genetics is messy stuff.
 
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