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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Simple question, are Betta fish suitable for a co2 tank? I literally can’t find anything online that’s straight to the point.

I know they have a Labyrinth Organ so I guess that’s the only difference to common fish


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If you keep your CO2 parameters within the acceptable range, absolutely. Tons of planted tanks out there with bettas and CO2. I had a pair that successfully bred in a high tech tank.
 

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Simple question, are Betta fish suitable for a co2 tank? I literally can’t find anything online that’s straight to the point.

I know they have a Labyrinth Organ so I guess that’s the only difference to common fish


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Yes they do fine with co2. I found I can crank my co2 up higher with my betta than other fish species without causing too much stress, and I'd believe that to be because of their ability to gulp air from the surface. As long as you don't have a tight fitting glass lid and have available oxygen at the water surface they do just fine.
 

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Might slightly increase the chance of jumpers if O2 gets low. Especially at night. Floating plants can help if you don't have a lid! I've had success before but definitely a few jump attempts


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Presumably one would turn the CO2 off, an hour or so before lights out... Or am I being too presumptuous?

In either case, a jumper betta is pretty rare. I mean... you see how they keep them in the "pet" stores. Not exactly an oxygen rich environment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys, Co2 will be off an hour before lights start to dim etc like usual, have a glass lid but it’s not a seal, just rests on top, I’ll also have a surface skimmer running 24/7 so that should help with any build up of gas that doesn’t break the surface.

The skimmer is on the outlet so no danger of losing any fish etc.

The tank is all set up now, I’m just going to wait a few weeks for the plants to root properly whilst I’m blasting it with high co2, I’ll bring it down to fish safe level over a period and the Betta gets a massive upgrade in environment


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I run my drop checker to bright yellow with high surface agitation. I have rich co2 in this tank because of my high light setup (2-3bps in a 5 gal), my betta isn't bothered in the slightest and I don't really see her hanging up at the top or breathing heavy. Aways happily weaving amongst the plants and enjoying her colorful jungle.

Funny others mentioned it's rare to have a betta jump. My surface agitation is very high and runs a current along the front panel of the tank. When I converted the tank from a low tech pond style to high tech dutch, 3 weeks in she rode the current and jumped. I found her dried up on my floor covered in cat hair. She survived and recovered completely, but since I got a piece of glass cut for a lid. It doesn't cover the entire top and has some pretty large gaps along the front and back panel of the tank for the lily pipes, but she hasn't made another jump since.
 

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In my case when I first started CO2 injection in early 2021 (about 1 year ago), I noticed out of all my fish, just one Dwarf Gourami had a difficult time adjusting. From experience, I suggest when anyone starts CO2 injection, make sure to also have at least an air stone. After I added an airstone, I noticed some of the fish simply loved going on top of it as if they were taking an air bubble shower. Some have other more elaborate methods of adding additional O2 into a tank. But having an airstone should help the fish adjust during the early period when you first add the injection system. Actually it is a good idea to have an airstone even if you don't have CO2 injection. And of course as has already been stated on this discussion, just add a proper range of CO2 to the tank and monitor kH and the pH variation throughout the day until you get familiar with the setup.
 

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But having an airstone should help the fish adjust during the early period when you first add the injection system. Actually it is a good idea to have an airstone even if you don't have CO2 injection.
I'd kinda disagree on this point - and here's why.

The solubility of oxygen in water decreases, as temperatures increase. So if you're giving a betta a proper temperature (75-80 degrees Farenheit), you're not imparting a whole lot of oxygen into the column Almost zero, in fact. Especially in a small tank. Not enough pressure or water column to properly dissolve oxygen, even with the smallest bubble size. As a secondary, your airstone will displace CO2. Not saying that it will displace all of it - but why waste any of it?

Good water movement is all one needs. There is a lot of surface area for oxygen and water interchange to take place at the top of even a small aquarium. And again, especially if it's just one fish. (the betta, in this case)
 
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